To snorkel or not to snorkel

Submitted: Friday, Jan 23, 2004 at 16:49
ThreadID: 9975 Views:1619 Replies:6 FollowUps:6
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Hey all,
I see the merit of a snorkel on diesels, but alas my 60 series is a petrol. Is there a benifit in fitting a snorkel to a petrol for what I believe they were truly designed for and that is tackling rivers.
The distributor on the cruiser is located lower in the engine bay than the factory intake anyway and wont this just get water and cause a stall loing before the intake sucks it in in it before the engine sucks it in?
I have never been through a river that deep and so the electrics have never been pushed to the test on waterproofness. I feel all my electrical leads are in top condition, but before I spend approx $450 fitted on a snorkel, is there any point in fitting it.
All thoughts appreciated.
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Reply By: Justin - Friday, Jan 23, 2004 at 17:17

Friday, Jan 23, 2004 at 17:17
I'd still opt for a snorkel. You get the benefit of getting cool, clean air to your engine and as you say a bit less to worry about when crossing rivers. You can still get enough water into a petrol to cause hydraulic lockup and copo some pretty costly repairs.
You can always try and waterproof your dizzy and coil.
One of the best attempts at this was covering the dizzy with a rubber glove with the leads coming out of the fingers (two leads coming out of two of the fingers I guess). The glove was cable tied around the dizzy and before the fingers were cable tied in place the whole thing was pumped full of grease)
The same thing was done with the coil. Apparently it worked pretty well.
Cheers,
Justin
AnswerID: 44127

Reply By: Gordon - Friday, Jan 23, 2004 at 17:23

Friday, Jan 23, 2004 at 17:23
Andi,

Tarp the front, remove the fan belt and maintain a bow wave and you won't wet the distributor.

I'd still opt for the snorkel as well.
AnswerID: 44128

Follow Up By: Andi - Friday, Jan 23, 2004 at 17:50

Friday, Jan 23, 2004 at 17:50
Wouldnt the viscous coupling on the fan itself help to prevent water spraying the engine bay?
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FollowupID: 306359

Follow Up By: Bonz (Vic) - Saturday, Jan 24, 2004 at 16:56

Saturday, Jan 24, 2004 at 16:56
You can still tear off the vanes of the plastic fan, even with a viscous coupling. I have a small hole in one fan blade that I use to tie the fan stationary for the duration of the crossing.If you hold your heart and focus,
you will end up holding your dream
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FollowupID: 306438

Follow Up By: Gordon - Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 14:31

Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 14:31
Andi,

Any means of KNOWING you have prevented the fan blades from turning is ok and I like Bonz's idea. It is not water spray you need to guard against, it is damage to the radiator caused by the fan blades being drawn forwards, as well as loss of blades on plastic fans. Let me assure you that if you tarp up and maintain a bow wave, then under your bonnett will remain relatively dry. If you stop however (which is a no no), the water will rise to the same level as outside, and no attempts at waterproofing the electrics will be entirely successful.

Gordon
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FollowupID: 306662

Reply By: Member - Frank - Friday, Jan 23, 2004 at 19:01

Friday, Jan 23, 2004 at 19:01
Hey if it do not help at least it will look good

sorry my sence of humer is a bit twisted tonight

frank
CBS
Cant Bl**dy Sitstill
AnswerID: 44139

Reply By: Paul - Friday, Jan 23, 2004 at 22:52

Friday, Jan 23, 2004 at 22:52
Andi,
I was considering getting a snorkel for my diesel cruiser until an experience I had the other night changed my mind. It happened outside Woolies in Mt Isa of all places. There'd been a lot of rain and I had a green light at the intersection which was covered with water, thinking it would be only shallow I charged through and to my suprise it must have been a fair depth because the water came up over the bonnet and the screen and kind of went "crump" on the roof. With the air intake under the bonnet there wasn't any problem but I am sure if I had a snorkel a lot of the water would have gone down it and in to the engine.
So I've decided against getting one, I suppose the scoop on a snorkel could be reversed but I am thinking that could drastically cut down air intake particularly at speed.
Paul
AnswerID: 44164

Follow Up By: navaraman - Saturday, Jan 24, 2004 at 07:55

Saturday, Jan 24, 2004 at 07:55
"There'd been a lot of rain and I had a green light at the intersection which was covered with water, thinking it would be only shallow I charged through and to my suprise it must have been a fair depth because the water came up over the bonnet"

You should always get out and wade before a water crossing, even outside Woolies. You might have a few problems planting some sticks to mark your path though. : ))
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FollowupID: 306410

Follow Up By: Bonz (Vic) - Saturday, Jan 24, 2004 at 17:00

Saturday, Jan 24, 2004 at 17:00
ROFLMAO, what about the crocs??????If you hold your heart and focus,
you will end up holding your dream
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FollowupID: 306439

Follow Up By: Chris (W.A.) - Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 20:06

Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 20:06
That's why a ram can be reversed as well.Nice southerly coastal fishing trip someday.
Chris
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FollowupID: 306700

Reply By: Diesel1 - Saturday, Jan 24, 2004 at 09:00

Saturday, Jan 24, 2004 at 09:00
G'day Andi,

I live in the Top End and a few years back I worked the spanners for the local Toyota dealer. During the Wet we got a run of fourbies in with stuffed donks (both diesel & petrol) as a result of deep water crossings and not 1 of them had a snorkel fitted. My opinion: waterproof the 60's electricals and go with the snorkel - it is money well invested due to the added benefit of cleaner air supply.

Diesel1
AnswerID: 44186

Reply By: KIM - Saturday, Jan 24, 2004 at 13:55

Saturday, Jan 24, 2004 at 13:55
Hi Andi,
In addition to what has been said previouly, you will find an improvement in your fuel useage, particularly if you intend to travel in dusty conditions for an extended period.
Regards
Kim
AnswerID: 44203

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