Inflating Tyres

Submitted: Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 05:43
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Hi all, I would like to know what people carry to inflate their tyres ? I plan to do some fishing on the beach and there isn't always a servo close for when u come off the beach. I don't want to wreck my tyres by driving too far with them under inflated . I have heard of devices u can put on your engine or do u carry portable 12v compressors?

Thanks
Trev
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Reply By: Member - John - Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 06:22

Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 06:22
Aironboard is one of the products you are referring too, if you plan to do a lot of inflating they are the better way to go but expensive compared to a 12v compressor. Do your home work if you decide to go 12v way as some are way better than others.........


Aironboard
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Reply By: Rockape - Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 06:33

Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 06:33
Trev,
have a look at this COMPRESSOR

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Follow Up By: Trevor G - Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 08:32

Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 08:32
Hi, thanks for the reply. They do look pretty good and not too expensive. Do u have one?
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Follow Up By: Rockape - Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 10:06

Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 10:06
Trev,
yes I do and find it works well. Only criticism is the on/off switch is not mounted on the body and I also fitted mine with a clip on chuck.
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Follow Up By: Trevor G - Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 10:43

Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 10:43
Excuse my lack of knowledge but what is a clip on chuck?
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Follow Up By: Rockape - Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 11:01

Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 11:01
Trev,
instead of having to hold or screw the airline onto the valve you can just clip it on. If you get one don't buy a cheapie.
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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 11:51

Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 11:51
I'd definately take that advice to not by a cheapie Rockape.

The various clipon's I used never lasted and I have back to a screwon as per picture.
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Reply By: Robin Miller - Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 08:08

Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 08:08
I think most would carry a portable 12v electric compressor.

We carry a fixed mounted ARB one which is also used to engage a locker.

However the ability to inflate tyres is very important so we cary a second device - an air transfer hose. This can be screwed onto our spare tyre and the air put back into the 4 road tyres.

The air transfer hose is quicker and doesn't load the battery so in practise its get used more - but it can of course only inflate the 4 tyres once before it needs to be re-filled at the next servo.

I don't think you can buy air transfer hoses (?) - most are home made.


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Follow Up By: Trevor G - Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 10:41

Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 10:41
What a great idea. Ill have to have a look at getting one made.
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Follow Up By: Bazooka - Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 11:33

Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 11:33
What pressure are you running in your spare Robin?
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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 11:48

Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 11:48
Unless on a special mission I usually run about 80 PSI Bazooka

So that when finshed 4wding and tyres are at 18 psi I can put'em backup to 30 psi

4 X 12psi into each tyre = 48 psi + 30psi = 78 PSI in spare
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Follow Up By: Bazooka - Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 12:29

Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 12:29
Any practical or safety issues inflating a tyre to that pressure that you are aware of Robin? I know I could always compromise with slightly lower pressures all round until I get to a servo. I like the idea but just a little wary. Much simpler than getting the compressor out.
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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 15:23

Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 15:23
Hi Bazooka

It should not be an issue with the normal LT construction tyres
that most have would have.

These usually have a ply rating of 10 and writing on them like this ->
Max load 1550kg @ 80 PSI cold.

(This actual means that if you put less than 80 psi in the tyres they will note take that 1550kg load).

I have 5 different tyre types here and while the specs say they are safe I never take things for granted and have tested mine to about 175 PSI (thats when my compressor gave up)
I calculated the safe PSI at 250 max.

There are specialist tyres that are rated lower like super swampers etc.

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Follow Up By: Bazooka - Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 15:47

Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 15:47
Thanks Robin. My Bridgestone LTs say max 65psi but I presume that would be the loaded limit when fitted to the vehicle. Probably be almost enough to do at least a partial transfer anyway.
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Follow Up By: Member - GeeTee (NT) - Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 17:49

Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 17:49
Hi Robin,

I might be missing something here but it looks to me like the fitting on the end of the blue hose is a spigot that goes into your compressor !! How do you use it to transfer air from one tyre to another ? ? Do you have another adapter ? ?

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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 18:12

Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 18:12
Your on the ball GeeTee

I carry 2 seperate hoses for redundancy and that is the compressor one I should have uploaded this one instead (clip on end)


Bazooka - Yes even though you have a 65PSI tyre that means 65psi at max load. Unloaded it can take massively more no issue.


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Follow Up By: Member - bungarra (WA) - Tuesday, Mar 26, 2013 at 13:26

Tuesday, Mar 26, 2013 at 13:26
Hi Robin

Can you tell me what that fitting is on the blue hose?......obviously a screw on but it must have an insert to depress the valve on the over inflated tyre to allow air to escape to the other........

tried describing this fitting once before and drew a blank

thanks
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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Tuesday, Mar 26, 2013 at 18:20

Tuesday, Mar 26, 2013 at 18:20
Hi Bungarra

I do not know of any standard source of that fitting.

Each of those hoses has one and in each case I got mine from cutting it off tyre valve extension hoses.

Truck use a little 6 inch extension so they get get onto the inner of twin wheels.

Also you can get a 1 meter valve extension that is used to extend valve on the spare wheel of cars whose wheels are hard to get to.

Actually you can even used one from a $2 bicycle hand pump however these are a bit restrictive.

Maybe someone else knows their offical name and a source.
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Reply By: Kris and Kev - Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 08:31

Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 08:31
If you go for a 12 volt compressor don’t be tempted to buy a cheapie. They usually do not last, but I suppose that depends on how much you are going to use it. But you would not want it to stop working half way through using it.
We carry two 12 volt portable compressors. One cost about $200 and the other was about $50. The dearer one is great for pumping up the tyres and we carry it in our rear draw with our recovery equipment. Connects via alligator clips direct to the car battery, comes in a bag with the air hose and inflates the tyres very quickly. (We do lower our air pressures to suit what roads we are travelling on, including off road.) The other is smaller and fits inside a rear compartment of our cruiser and is handy to pump up the rear air bags and for other light uses. It just plugs into a standard cigarette type plug. I found this setup right for our uses. (I know some will say why I didn’t just install one good compressor. But like I said, this suits our needs.) Kevin
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Reply By: MEMBER - Darian, SA - Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 12:19

Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 12:19
I use an ARB mark 1 12V compressor - installed in the rear of the car - hard wired to the aux. battery - using snap on air fittings, I use an air line that reaches all wheels on the car and the van - with THIS TYPE OF END FITTING (pencil gauge within ... psi - kpa etc.) it is ideal for bush trips and filling tyres on barrows and bikes at home..... well worth the outlay - mine is about 10 years old. PS: Such compressors can be relatively slow on taking all of your tyres back up to highway pressures, but scientists have proven that time travels slower on bush trips, so you won't notice this :-o).
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Follow Up By: Member - PJR (NSW) - Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 14:05

Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 14:05
Almost identical here.

We have a compressor mounted in a void beside the set of drawers at the rear of the car. An air outlet is mounted right at the rear door. A long coiled hose then allows us to reach both car and, if ever we tow (not likely), a trailer or van's tyres. A heavy duty fused circuit runs directly from our auxiliary pair of batteries to the compressor which is turned on and off through a switch is on the center console with all our other accessories switches. We normally leave the motor running when pumping the tyres up.

Phil
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Reply By: Flighty ( WA ) - Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 14:34

Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 14:34
Trev.
Got an ARB compressor "hard wired" in back of ute, this is "hard coupled" to a 10 litre capacity reservoir under the tray.
This has served well with all applications, as all plug in fittings go to the tank with hose that reaches around vehicle and c/trailer.
Having this set up with pressure switch helps in the "overheating" issue most people seem to have.
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Reply By: Trevor G - Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 15:04

Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 15:04
Thanks everyone for your feedback.

I got a price on the ARB which was $349.00 and $49.95 for the guage attachment.

I suppose its like everything else you get what you pay for. Ill have to save a few dollars.

Really appreciate all the feedback. Good bunch of people on this forum.

Trev
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Follow Up By: Bazooka - Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 18:17

Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 18:17
Trev

Your choice, but there plenty of good compressors cheaper than the ARB. You might be interested in this recent magazine test of some of the better known compressors.


Air compressor test
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Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 18:18

Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 18:18
Trevor,

Some compressors, like the ARB, or the ABR, are also available in a portable model.
They are contained in a tool box (or canvas bag in the case of ABR) and give the advantage of being able to be used on multiple vehicles, or used anywhere a 12 volt supply is available.

I have a "big Red" which is a few years old but still great to use.
The latest ARB twin, is a bit quicker to inflate 4 wheels but mine is not too shabby.

Another plus for a good quality unit is that they have thermal overload protection and can also be used to reseat tyres that have had the bead broken.


Bill


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Follow Up By: Trevor G - Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 20:50

Monday, Mar 25, 2013 at 20:50
Thanks Bazooka. Interesting reading about the compressors.
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