Measuring Exhaust Gas Temperature

Submitted: Thursday, May 09, 2013 at 13:28
ThreadID: 102101 Views:3272 Replies:12 FollowUps:13
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Are there any preferred makes of exhaust gas temp. meters? I want to instal one in my RG Colorado but I'm confused (not hard) by the variation in prices being asked on the market. The VDO comes in at around $380 and fleabay has them at vastly less than that. I would appreciate advice on brands and generally what to look out for. Thanks guys.

Mark
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Reply By: Mr Pointyhead - Thursday, May 09, 2013 at 14:36

Thursday, May 09, 2013 at 14:36
When I got my EGT the main thing I looked for was a auidable alarm that you could set to go off when/if the temp gets to high. That way I only look at the EGT when somthing interestring is going on... Oh.. And I set the alarm loud so it really gets the attention of whoever is driving the vehicle.
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Reply By: Member - Terry W4 - Thursday, May 09, 2013 at 14:47

Thursday, May 09, 2013 at 14:47
Can't comment on brands but would like to add a comment. When i use to fly light aircraft an EGT guage was a very important piece of equipment. As air density is less the higher one flies you lean the mxiture (air to fuel ratio) once at cruise (sometimes on climb). You lean out and watch the EGT as it climbs you wait until it peaks and then reduce the lean to have the mixture on the rich side of peak. Maximises fule burn but too lean and EGT too hot and you will burn out a cyclinder.

AnswerID: 510640

Follow Up By: Penchy - Thursday, May 09, 2013 at 16:34

Thursday, May 09, 2013 at 16:34
I would assume this would be for a 4wd application and a diesel engine so I'm not sure why the story about planes? Only thing I could get from this post is that be sure the engine is tuned correctly. Pretty standard stuff really.
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Follow Up By: Member - Terry W4 - Thursday, May 09, 2013 at 17:48

Thursday, May 09, 2013 at 17:48
Well Penchy just thought it might be of interest to illustrate how others use EGTs and the consequences. Air density is quite important for air-fuel ration. It is why if you care has been tuned at sea level and you drive up the mountains it may run a bit rough.
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Follow Up By: Rockape - Thursday, May 09, 2013 at 18:37

Thursday, May 09, 2013 at 18:37
Terry,
Don't even bother replying to Mr P as the word troll comes to mind. Mr P never posts anything or gives answers. He just shoots the nets and sees what he catches.

Your reply was a good example of using egt gauges. The only difference from a petrol engine and a diesel is, diesels like lean running to keep egts down and petrols don't like to be leaned out.

Have a good one.

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Follow Up By: Penchy - Thursday, May 09, 2013 at 20:32

Thursday, May 09, 2013 at 20:32
If you choose to label people with derogatory names to make yourself feel better, go for it. I've found there is no shortage of people on here that like to jump on the name calling band wagon when they see some one else do it. Bit like sheep I guess.

Sticking to the topic, I personally don't see the value in an EGT gauge. It's just another item measuring something you don't really need to know anyway. If you have a regularly tuned and serviced vehicle there shouldn't be a need for one. If your flogging the car through soft sand on a 40 degree day then of course the engine is going to be working hard, increasing egt. Have a bit of common sense behind the wheel and you wont need one and put the money towards a better accessory.
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Follow Up By: mountainman - Friday, May 10, 2013 at 02:27

Friday, May 10, 2013 at 02:27
i dont think it was derogatory from P..
i think he just didnt get the message on the plane engine.
its all the same.
if the engine is getting worked, has load and youve got the foot to the floor, the engine temps will increase.
id find it far safer to put a EGT into the manifold, extractors than just rely on a stupid temp guage from the factory that isnt quite accurate.

you will see the EGT temps rise before any radiator guage will.

and some people thing, ooh just back off.. but sometimes its better to know exactly what your engine is doing than having a guess, ooh the temp guage on the dash is getting a little hot, well i feel thats too late !!

the EGT guage is soo much more accurate, and will tell you if your pushing too hard.
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Reply By: Member - Rosco from way back - Thursday, May 09, 2013 at 16:14

Thursday, May 09, 2013 at 16:14
Have you chipped, or in any other way altered your vehicle engine arrangement from bog standard.

The reason I ask is if standard, then I query the real need. I had one on a previous Landy TD5 which had been chipped and tended to over fuel on occasion, however I would venture to suggest most/all standard engine setups would be fairly conservative and hence it would be more difficult to get EGT's up in the danger zone, unless of course you were towing a heavy load and driving hard up hills etc, in which case common sense suggests it would be smart to back off and drop down a gear.
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Follow Up By: Ross M - Thursday, May 09, 2013 at 18:39

Thursday, May 09, 2013 at 18:39
I agree With Rosco, unless you want to see the temp and have an alarm for preventative reasons the normal use with the already programmed ECU ( it knows what is happening through all the range of use) will control within safe limits, unless something goes wrong.

Your next problem is where you are going to install it. Pre turbo or Post turbo. Pre is into the manifold and Post is into the exhaust.
Temps in both positions with the same exhaust flow may show 150C to 200C lower after the turbo and so you should be aware of this when deciding what you expect to see and where you will position the probe.

Ross M
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Reply By: bluefella - Thursday, May 09, 2013 at 16:35

Thursday, May 09, 2013 at 16:35
I've had a THERMOGAURD on one of my vehicles, about to fit one to another. have not had any problems with it.
No affiliation with em'
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Follow Up By: Member - Andrew L (QLD) - Thursday, May 09, 2013 at 17:06

Thursday, May 09, 2013 at 17:06
Another vote for Thermogard...been on for about 6 years.
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Follow Up By: Boeing (PER - Thursday, May 09, 2013 at 22:19

Thursday, May 09, 2013 at 22:19
Make that 3 for Thermogard


Cheers

Mark
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Reply By: craigandej - Thursday, May 09, 2013 at 17:46

Thursday, May 09, 2013 at 17:46
Hi

I recently installed an EGT gauge into my troopy, which I purchased from www.auberins.com. in the US of A.
They also sell on Ebay but buy direct and you can choose your mounting options.
My Beaudesert exhaust had a port ready to go in 1/4" BSP. Cost was just under $100 all up. You can also install an alarm to the unit if you wish.
This digital gauge fitted nicely in my dash, and was highly recommended on another popular 4WD forum site.

Cheers
Craig
AnswerID: 510651

Follow Up By: Member - Nolo (Brisbane) - Thursday, May 09, 2013 at 20:05

Thursday, May 09, 2013 at 20:05
Second vote for the Auber Instruments gauge. A quality unit at a good price and delivered promptly. It is a digital readout so the temperature changes constantly with the right foot effort. I consider it a valuable feedback to what is going on with the engine and I love it.
Regards
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Reply By: Member - John - Thursday, May 09, 2013 at 19:26

Thursday, May 09, 2013 at 19:26
G'day, I have used an Isspro EGT from the states, is colour coded for easy reference. Have it post turbo as it is easier to fit.

John and Jan

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AnswerID: 510661

Reply By: Dingojim - Friday, May 10, 2013 at 07:46

Friday, May 10, 2013 at 07:46
Before all this high tec stuff came along we just used to pick up a hitchhiker, hang them over the tailboard with a finger up the tailpipe and instructions to yell out if the skin came off the finger whereby we would back off the juice a bit. When we got to our destination we would buy them a small beer to soak their finger in.
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Reply By: Lucko - Friday, May 10, 2013 at 08:58

Friday, May 10, 2013 at 08:58
Thanks for the input guys, some serious food for thought. I can only see value in being able to monitor what my engine is doing. The 2.8L diesel ute is primarily used to tow a 2T caravan, I have only just moved to the 'dark side' (diesel) and have much to learn.

Mark
AnswerID: 510709

Reply By: Member - kym111 (WA) - Friday, May 10, 2013 at 15:55

Friday, May 10, 2013 at 15:55
Hi Lucko,
we recently installed a bigger turbo in our 2004 4.2ltr Patrol. Hubby had Autron LCD digital guages installed, via a pillar mount. They were pricey, but apparently worth it! He has set it so a sound alarm goes off at a certain temp, as well as the guage background changing colour. There was also a dimmer switch option, but the auto electrician neglected to install this (after we paid extra for the part!). They are quite bright at night. Look at www.autron.com.au.
Hope this helps
Kym
AnswerID: 510739

Reply By: Member - bungarra (WA) - Friday, May 10, 2013 at 19:14

Friday, May 10, 2013 at 19:14
I have an Auber...well priced....good digital readout..........can set audible alarm output as well

FYI Chipit...use Auber on their diesel chips

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AnswerID: 510751

Reply By: Batt's - Friday, May 10, 2013 at 21:35

Friday, May 10, 2013 at 21:35
Apparently digital gauges are more accurate from what I've read. I have their pyrometer 006 model small and easy to read and fit to the dash type in - square digital gauges which will bring up dynotunenitrous.com.
AnswerID: 510761

Follow Up By: Tim HJ61 (WA) - Friday, May 10, 2013 at 23:09

Friday, May 10, 2013 at 23:09
A dial gauge is easier to read when glancing at it, rather than having to decipher numbers which will be constantly changing with an EGT gauge. I DO like the idea of an alarm that I would set to 600°C and leave it all alone. I'd even go with a red light on the dash and a buzzer and dispense with the gauge altogether. Once the vehicle is modified and tuned to run in the safe zone most of the time, the EGT gauge is just something else to gaze at.

Tim
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Follow Up By: Batt's - Sunday, May 12, 2013 at 07:32

Sunday, May 12, 2013 at 07:32
Difficult to decipher numbers at a glance for some maybe did you know cars have had digital speedometers since the 80's and they constantly change and yet there still making them today go figure. Of course an egt gauge will be constantly changing remember your only glancing at it not staring.
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Follow Up By: Tim HJ61 (WA) - Sunday, May 12, 2013 at 11:06

Sunday, May 12, 2013 at 11:06
That's exactly right, you're not staring at it, so what does it matter whether the EGT is 456, or 465 degrees? You'll spend longer deciphering a digital than you will a dial gauge.

You're looking for a general indication for safety parameters, much like an oil pressure gauge or a water temp gauge. Are they commonly in digital? No
Do race car drivers commonly have digital gauges for their instruments? No.
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Follow Up By: Batt's - Monday, May 13, 2013 at 07:02

Monday, May 13, 2013 at 07:02
You better catch up on your race cars because quite a few Nascars ,F1, V8 supercars, rally cars etc use digital readouts and have have done for quite a while I leave on that note.
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Reply By: Lucko - Saturday, May 11, 2013 at 08:59

Saturday, May 11, 2013 at 08:59
Thanks again guys. More food for thought. Taking ute to my diesel dude to see how to fit the thermocouple, access to the turbo is very tight, so there might be some fun there.

Mark
AnswerID: 510777

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