Whats the most difficult job performed on your 4by as a Diy mechanic?

Submitted: Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 19:47
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Or for full time Mechanics that service 4bys?


Mine!!, i think fitting a master cyl to a landrover defender

one bolt that has everything built over it under it makes it a nightmare to get out!

the other way is to pull the whole pedal box out then patience is a virtue


Cheers Axle.
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Reply By: Member - Toyocrusa (NSW) - Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 19:51

Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 19:51
G'day axle. Replacing a clutch in a Mitsubishi Challenger has to be up there. Vowed i'de not do another one. (maybe I'm just getting old though) Cheers,Bob.
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Follow Up By: Axle - Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 19:57

Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 19:57
G/Day Bob, ...thinking the same way mate, this age thing is getting to me!...lol.


Cheers.
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Reply By: disco driver - Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 20:06

Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 20:06
The worst DYI mechanical job I did was a solo gearbox/transfer case removal and replacement on a S2A landrover, the model where everything has to be removed and the whole lot comes out through the door. Never again.

The funniest, looking back it was, but very frustrating at the time, was a diff rebuild on my very first car ('27 Austin 7).
Somehow I managed to turn the whole crown wheel and pinion cage over so on rebuilding I found 3 reverse gears and only 1 forward. Bugga.

Disco.
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Follow Up By: Axle - Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 20:18

Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 20:18
Lol Disco, ...reminds me of a mate sitting at traffic lights after a rebuild of his gearbox, ...stuffed up big time with linkages somewhere what was first became reverse ...lol lol. hence the bloke behind got the fright of his life on take off!.


cheers.Axle.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 20:32

Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 20:32
Hey Disco, my very first car was also a 1927 Austin 7.
Did you also strip the crown wheel? Or break a crankshaft?
It could'a been fun to drive at 30mph backwards. Well maybe 20mph!
Cheers
Allan

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Reply By: Member - PJR (NSW) - Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 20:13

Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 20:13
On the 4WD it was today. Two bloody difficult hours. And not a neighbour to be seen. I had to remount the winch higher in the bar so that the roller fairlead, that arrived yesterday, would fit. And on my own. That winch is too heavy for me. I had ropes and stuff every where to help me lift it.

But the biggest job I did was on the Kingswood changing everything from the flywheel back to the diff to change the car from a three on the column to a four on the floor. Including cutting a hole for the gear lever with a chisel and hammer and a bunch of files.

I once rebuilt a cosworth engine for an Imp which was easier than the others. I took weeks to do it. Even had to source rings and bearings from the UK. It was in a Hillman Imp GT that was left to me in my brothers will..

Phil
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Follow Up By: Axle - Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 20:26

Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 20:26
G/Day Phil, what you can do when you you have no option..lol

But when your a young bloke theres no such thing as worry, or younger bloke i should say!...lol.

Cheers.
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Follow Up By: Member - MUZBRY(Vic) - Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 20:38

Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 20:38
Phil
They were Coventry Climax design engines .

Muzbry
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Follow Up By: Member - PJR (NSW) - Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 20:38

Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 20:38
Too true mate.Young and full of beans, fit and healthy.

The fairlead was needed for this weekend. The others were when I was less than 30 and fit.

Hooroo

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Follow Up By: Member - PJR (NSW) - Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 20:57

Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 20:57
My error. You are correct. Memory screw up again. Luckily I am not working hey!!

It sounded like a bike coming up the road. It sure had some revs. Would lift the inside front wheel on hard cornering. And would eat up the mini coopers.

Don't tell me you had one!

Phil
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Follow Up By: Member - MUZBRY(Vic) - Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 22:23

Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 22:23
Phil
I am a very old mechanic .

Muzbry
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Reply By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 20:24

Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 20:24
Pulling the front end out to weld the radius arm bracket back on to the axle, Axle. Remote on the Nullabor.

Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Axle - Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 20:32

Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 20:32
Bloody Hell!!!, Toyos aren't supposed to do that are they?....lol


looks like you done well anyway!


Cheers.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 20:37

Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 20:37
Luckily I was with Connie Beadell and Mick Hutton. Mick's mechanical skills were invaluable and so far the repair has held.
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Allan

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Reply By: Member - MUZBRY(Vic) - Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 20:34

Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 20:34
Gday Axle
I have trouble fixing the droning noise on the left side of the car .

Muzbry
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Follow Up By: Axle - Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 20:37

Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 20:37
Your wireless is not loud enough Muzbry!!

Cheers.
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Follow Up By: Member - MUZBRY(Vic) - Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 20:39

Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 20:39
Axle
The drone keeps yurning it down....

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Follow Up By: Member - Toyocrusa (NSW) - Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 20:40

Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 20:40
I've met that noise and she is a very nice lady.
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Follow Up By: Member - MUZBRY(Vic) - Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 20:40

Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 20:40
Look at that, I can't spell....
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Follow Up By: Mick O - Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 23:38

Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 23:38
Oh man, if she ever manages to get on EO, you're dead! (Well that may be a bit harsh but you'll defeinitly have nothing to scratch!)

You need to change your EO handle to "DMW" - (Dead Man Walking!)


;-)

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Follow Up By: Pathycop - Saturday, May 25, 2013 at 15:34

Saturday, May 25, 2013 at 15:34
What's a wireless ?

Graeme
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Follow Up By: Axle - Saturday, May 25, 2013 at 18:22

Saturday, May 25, 2013 at 18:22
Mate its a thing that looks like a radio...lol.



Cheers.
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Reply By: Member - Serendipity(WA) - Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 22:19

Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 22:19
So many great jobs already.

With my old landcruiser I had the issue of the rear wheel axle studs snapping off. It happened so often I could easy out 6 of them and put new ones in on the side of the road. It was a problem for years that I could not fix, mechanics could not fix or toyota could not fix. Until finally outside of a ARB shop I saw another landcruiser with the same issue who had drilled the 6mm studs out and replaced them with 8mm studs. Well that fixed it. And then when I bought my new cruiser that is how toyota fixed it too.

Other difficult jobs. When I was younger, swopped two landcruiser engines out each time in the carport at home. That took a fair bit on my own with manual in one hand. The first one was a petrol 2f engine in my old fj45. Turned out the motor from the wreckers had 2 cracked outlet ports. Had to keep rehoning them every couple of days after work to keep going until I could afford a new head back in the day. Got pretty quick pulling the head off and grinding the valves back into place before dinner was served.

Swopped out a bent rear axle housing on my old landcruiser for another one again in the carport at home.

Or after traversing the Gunbarrell hwy and finding the steering knuckles totally shot to a dangerous floppy stage I changed them out in a road stop just out of Alice Springs. Bit hard doing a steering alignment but managed the rest of the 2000km with a bit of toe in.

Had a split radiator top tank. At the time I could not afford to replace it so I would pull it out and resolder it up every weekend. I could pull the radiator in 8 mins after a while.

Oh the fun you have when young and poor. So many more.

Cheers

Serendipty


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Reply By: Mick O - Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 23:28

Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 23:28
Axle,

Having absolutely no mechanical skill what-so-ever, I've had the good sense to do the next best thing other than learn how to fix it myself....buy heaps of tools! These days the greatest difficulty I have is actually deciding which bloke I let fix the problem using MY tools! They all fight over the issue, it's almost embarrassing!

Many a time Outback Al (or "ballast" as he is better known as) and I have been in the rig during our overland expeditions when someone will call an issue. We'll both give each other that "oh bleep ...here it comes" look knowing that the other blokes in the convoy will be racing each other to the scene of the crime! They're bloody mechanical-issue paparazzi! I'm almost at the point of having to pack a spare adjudicator to sort out the arguments.

Meanwhile Al and me, well we organise the hot water, cups of tea and do a lot of oo-ing and ahhhing to make them feel good! (Cold beers are forbotten until ze job is done!) ;-)

In all seriousness, putting the rear wheel back on the tucker truck after it sheered the pins on the Mitchell Plateau Road in 2010 was interesting but I reckon rebuilding the motor on the 720 Kingcab ute on the Gunbarrel (circa 1984) using nothing more than a paper clip, a box of matches and harsh language was the best!


Great post. Cheers Mick










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Follow Up By: Member - John (Vic) - Friday, May 24, 2013 at 00:29

Friday, May 24, 2013 at 00:29
Nothing has changed, you still don't listen to her :)
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Follow Up By: Member - MUZBRY(Vic) - Friday, May 24, 2013 at 19:27

Friday, May 24, 2013 at 19:27
Gday MickO
I think all those pictures were taken with mirrors,,,,,

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Follow Up By: Axle - Saturday, May 25, 2013 at 18:25

Saturday, May 25, 2013 at 18:25
Lol Mick O, ...Keep those Guys on side, Brilliant!


Cheers Axle.
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Reply By: Zambezi - Friday, May 24, 2013 at 02:14

Friday, May 24, 2013 at 02:14
I qualified as a mechanic back in 1967 with the BMC / British Leyland company in Southern Africa. I always did my own repairs/servicing until about 18 months ago. In the days when I had my 4runner , one of the worst jobs was having to drop the entire front end in order to remove the sump, all for a 50cent O ring seal on the oil pump. When it was idling you couldnt see anything, but soon as the revs went up , oil would be pouring out the front of the sump right onto the crankshaft pulley. As I had no workshop, other then all my tools and 4 ton garage jack, it was a two day job just to replace that seal. While the sump was off , gave me the opportunity to wash it out thoroughly and then the uphill struggle to bolt everything back.

Sadly age has caught up , and I can no longer do any heavy lifting etc other then an oil and filter change as I have ramps that I run the front end of my latest vehicle up and onto the top. A garage creeper with a head rest, makes the job a piece of cake, but anything over and beyond that, I have to rely on a mate who is a Toyota mechanic and has a fully equipped workshop at his home. Oh and another one, was replacing the front diff to fit a locker in. Getting the diff out was tiresome and time consuming, but to get it back in single handed was nigh on impossible. Plenty of improvising and some choice language plus a few hours of grunting and whinging I finally got it in and running. Why do today's vehicle manufacturers make it nigh on impossible to get ones hands into the engine bay - even to check the oil level on the dipstick ???
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Follow Up By: Echucan Bob - Sunday, May 26, 2013 at 19:39

Sunday, May 26, 2013 at 19:39
Zambezi, I'm surprised there was much call for a BMC mechanic back then - the cars were so reliable! Not. My first car was an Austin Lancer, given to me by my grandmother. It was badly rusted but at least it got me about town. A friend had an MGA and I often dreamt of upgrading the donk in the Lancer with MGA parts. I got as far as acquiring the manifold for mounting the twin SU carbies. Sadly, most of my time was spent just keeping it going. I replaced the diff, the gearbox, the starter motor, and finally the whole engine - I dropped in a 1620 from a more recent vehicle. A friend 'helped' me by moving the car for me - he dropped the clutch to do a big wheel spin in reverse, snapping an axle. At this stage I just thought "#### it" and towed it to the wreckers. So while it was a dog of a car, it taught me quite a lot. Like don't let friends do wheel spins in your car. It also was the econo model of a range of cars that included the Wolesley 1500, the Riley 1.5 and the MGA. I wouldn't mind having a Riley 1.5 in the garage.

Bob
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Follow Up By: Zambezi - Monday, May 27, 2013 at 12:48

Monday, May 27, 2013 at 12:48
Echucan Bob.
Believe me, back in those days the big 6 cylinder Austin's` Wolseleys` were so damned reliable that the only time we ever saw them was for their regular servicing. the odd clutch, but never had and engine down for a rebuild. The good old stalwarts such as the Morris Oxford , Austin A60, Riley1.5 Wolseley 1500 and the entire range of BMC vehicles were mostly in for servicing, blown exhausts, brakes and the like. When the Mini` and the Morris/Austin1100 models appeared, then the problems started. Mini Coopers with the 995cc motors were pretty good , the 1074 was total disaster, yet the 1275 was a gem of a car to throw around. The MGB with the B series engine was as reliable as ever. Lucas ( the Lord of Darkness ) was the main gripe with all thing British - wiring, starters , generators ( alternators arrived in those days, the MG 1600 sports car was ugly but reliable except for the TC model which kept blowing cylinder heads and popping holes through pistons. Best car I owned and still have was the Austin-Healey 3000 MK3 Series3 BJ8.Have had mine for close on 50 years and underwent a full and total rebuild inside and out. Will now have to last the rest of my days. Cheers.
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Follow Up By: Echucan Bob - Tuesday, May 28, 2013 at 08:48

Tuesday, May 28, 2013 at 08:48
Zambezi
The Austin Healey is a truly beautiful car. Of the cars you mention my mother had several Minis. Yes they were great to chuck around. Sadly, the distributor was set forward of the transverse engine and acted as a moisture sensor. Other than that it was great car. I borrowed it as soon as I got my licence for a 'road trip' with a few mates, where it was subjected to a few new experiences.
My brother had a Wolseley with a Blue Streak motor I think. The name sounded ominous, if you are familiar with the history of rocketry in Australia, but it was a very luxurious car at the time.
On sports cars, another mate had a TR3A which we drove from Melbourne to Brisbane for a wedding. The problem was we had to rebuild the engine before we could leave, so were up all night juggling wet sleeves etc before departure in the morning. After a slow trip up, we let it rip on the return making the intercapital trip via the Newell Hwy in 12.5 hours. Nowadays, that sort of trip would see you in the slammer in Goondawindi.
My indulgence vehicle is a black Porsche Carrera 4 Cabriolet. Sadly, every time I drive it the local coppers see 'drug runner' making progress slow. At 60, I can't see myself replacing it.
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Reply By: TTTSA - Friday, May 24, 2013 at 06:00

Friday, May 24, 2013 at 06:00
Guess i've been pretty lucky, but getting to and replacing the fuel cut solenoid on my 100 series took a bit of patience and choice words. Hammer and cold chisel, not really knowing what to expect.

Peter
AnswerID: 511710

Reply By: Penchy - Friday, May 24, 2013 at 09:00

Friday, May 24, 2013 at 09:00
The bright spark that owned my car before me thought the best way to fix the cooling issue was to weld up the viscous fan hub so it didn't slip. 30km out of Taree on the Pacific the fan blades disintegrated, sent the water pump off balance bending the shaft and a piece of fan sliced the bottom rad hose.
I'm no mechanic, but I like to think anything I can unbolt and remove, I can bolt back on again. removing fan is easy, removing water pump is not so easy. Top and bottom timing belt covers have to come off to acces the water pump bolts. To access the bottom timing cover the crank pulley has to come off. I didnt have all the tools to do the job, and Taree didn't have all the parts to replace the broken ones. So a trip to Sydney, a couple of trips to Taree for tools and about 12hrs under the bonnet while my brother read his book, and it was fixed.
I didn't have a torque wrench for the pulley bolt, but that was fixed later.

Car is a GQ Patrol with RD28T - another reason to hate that motor.
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Follow Up By: Member - Keith P (NSW) - Friday, May 24, 2013 at 13:25

Friday, May 24, 2013 at 13:25
What year model was your RD28??
I have a 5/1997 RX...and I just recently changed water pump and fan clutch. Just loosened belts...undid the four bolts holding clutch on...and the half dozen or so studs around pump and off it came...no removeal of timing cover..didnt even remove shroud...was able to get fan out when unbolted.

Cheers Keith
Nothin is ever the same once I own it ...........

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Reply By: Rod W - Friday, May 24, 2013 at 09:07

Friday, May 24, 2013 at 09:07
I had a 1972 Toyota Dyna Twin Cab ute body 1.5 tonne. In 1986 or thereabouts I replaced the 2ltr engine with a Holden 253 V8. In 1992 I converted it from 2wd to 4wd all road legal.
AnswerID: 511718

Follow Up By: Member - Keith P (NSW) - Friday, May 24, 2013 at 13:18

Friday, May 24, 2013 at 13:18
Replacing those little short bloodyhardtogetat studs in behind intake/turbo chamber that hold the heat shield over exhaust on a RD 28 Nissan. Took nearly all afternoon...and if it wasnt for my mate with his strong skinny fingers...there would have been 2 that would never have been done. Anyway...after it was finished...there was no more tinny noise coming from engine bay...so it was worth it?? I reckon. From memory it was about 4 rum arvo.

Cheers Keith
Nothin is ever the same once I own it ...........

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Reply By: olcoolone - Friday, May 24, 2013 at 16:22

Friday, May 24, 2013 at 16:22
Don't know how some DIYers do it, we have trouble sometimes and thats even with specialised tools and availability of in depth information.

But we also see our fair share of DIYers making the job 10 times harder for us after the tried to save a few $$.

With the onset of more vehicle specific ways of doing things, tools and equipment the days of the DIYers are slowly coming to an end for some repairs.

One of the latest things we have had to get is a specialised tools for "stretch fit belts" with a price tag of around $250 per specific vehicle.

Without these tools you can not remove or fit the engine drive belts.

And not forgetting a scan tool to do brake bleeding or headlight globe resetting after a blown globe.
AnswerID: 511758

Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Friday, May 24, 2013 at 16:53

Friday, May 24, 2013 at 16:53
I know where you are coming from olcoolone re the need for specialised tools but I would not dismiss too easily the ingenuity of some DIY'ers to find a way around it.
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Axle - Saturday, May 25, 2013 at 18:33

Saturday, May 25, 2013 at 18:33
I know Olcoolone,...Your right...What about the price of the latest tension wrenches,?...

cheers Axle.
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Reply By: Member - Craig F (WA) - Friday, May 24, 2013 at 22:31

Friday, May 24, 2013 at 22:31
Worst job would have to be changing the oil filters on a TDi4.2 GU. You will loose skin you will earth yourself to the battery and you will empty both the filters down the side of your motor into your starter then all over the pumpkin before it paints the ground....
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