Metal or Plastic Jerry Can

Submitted: Monday, May 27, 2013 at 20:52
ThreadID: 102451 Views:4764 Replies:8 FollowUps:9
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I need to carry some extra diesel fuel on our next trip to eastern NT in August.
Is there a preferred fuel container - metal or plastic [poly] jerry can?
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Reply By: AlbyNSW - Monday, May 27, 2013 at 21:05

Monday, May 27, 2013 at 21:05
If you do a search this question was asked about 6 weeks ago and I think the majority preferred a quality plastic Jerry can, that is what I prefer



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Reply By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Monday, May 27, 2013 at 22:53

Monday, May 27, 2013 at 22:53
The fuel safe cans have the best lid seal but the filler hole won't take the high flow diesel bowser nozzle without a struggle , The Willow brand Jerry can uses an off the shelf cap but bigger opening. Hope this helps! Michael
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Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Tuesday, May 28, 2013 at 17:30

Tuesday, May 28, 2013 at 17:30
Gday Michael,
Yeah the Willows are $18 at Supercheap until 10th June, so that might help some decide too!
Cheers
phil
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Reply By: gbc - Tuesday, May 28, 2013 at 06:02

Tuesday, May 28, 2013 at 06:02
I use both. I have 23l canadian red plastic ones with flex pourers and a screw out breather that are 25 odd years old which are unbreakable and awesome in every way. I also have 3 mil spec steel jerry cans with the clip in metal pourer because I have a trakshak and no other jerry can will fit. I think they are just about the most piss poor, leaking, dripping, heavy, hard to fit in a fuel hole, hard to empty properly, take ages do drain pieces of complete and utter crap I have ever used, but they are the only things that fit the storage area allotted to me.
So as you can see it is a close run thing in my humble opinion ;)
Not to mention the fact I can use the plastic ones in my boat and not have them rust on the floor, chip the gelcoat and leave paint marks everywhere. Yep those steel ones are just great - want some?
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Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Tuesday, May 28, 2013 at 07:16

Tuesday, May 28, 2013 at 07:16
gbc,

What you need is a Tanami Pump. They are just about the best invention since sliced bread.

I only have the steel Jerry cans you loathe and they do not move from their lair on the camper. A long piece of fuel hose and a puff of air is all that I require to transfer the contents from the Jerry's to the fuel tank.

No more lifting heavy fuel cans and splashing the boots with diesel.

If you really need to, you could lift the Jerry from its storage area and just place it on the ground near the filler neck, then use the Tanami pump to transfer.

Just by the way, a group of us traveled to Milparinga last year and one of the group had a red plastic Jerry mounted on his trailer behind the mudguard line. A rock had been flicked up and punctured a sizable hole in the substantial bottom of the Jerry and all contents had disappeared.
That just wouldn't happen with a steel Jerry.
Mine are several years old and the only maintenance required is the rare replacement of a rubber cap seal, if they harden.

Plastic fuel cans have their advantages, such as you have mentioned for a boat. I also have one for my lawnmower and another for my chainsaw, both of which were purchased for their size, rather than their construction.

But when it comes to precious fuel when traveling the outback, I will stick with the extra security steel Jerrys provide.

Bill


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Follow Up By: sweetwill - Tuesday, May 28, 2013 at 07:35

Tuesday, May 28, 2013 at 07:35
Bill where do you buy the rubber seals from, I am in desperate need of three cheers Bill.
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Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Tuesday, May 28, 2013 at 07:44

Tuesday, May 28, 2013 at 07:44
Any good camping store should have them Bill, or perhaps somewhere like Super Cheap Auto.

Bill


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Follow Up By: garrycol - Tuesday, May 28, 2013 at 11:02

Tuesday, May 28, 2013 at 11:02
Supercheap have them.
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Follow Up By: gbc - Tuesday, May 28, 2013 at 12:29

Tuesday, May 28, 2013 at 12:29
I have lusted after a tanami pump for years, but every time it comes to get the wallet out I can't do it. One day ill get there I promise. They are a brilliant idea, just need an adaptor rather than completely new pumps.
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Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Tuesday, May 28, 2013 at 17:24

Tuesday, May 28, 2013 at 17:24
My only criticism of the tanami pumps is that you are delivering the stuff out of the bottom of the jerry first - so if you did have any water or muck in the bottom of the jerry, it will be the first to go into the tank. My preference is to pour fuel from the jerry via a funnel with a gauze (might replace this with a Mr Funnel this year). That way any water or rubbish stays in the jerry if you leave the last bit in there or you'll see it on the gauze filter. With the willow yellow jerries you can see inside through the large lid and if it looks fine, pour the rest in.

Also the willow jerries take the highflow diesel nozzle easily. I used steel jerrys for 20 years and plastic for the last 10 - I prefer the plastic.
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Follow Up By: River Swaggie - Thursday, May 30, 2013 at 04:07

Thursday, May 30, 2013 at 04:07
Hi Phil

I've been using the Tanami Pump for years now and don't leave home without it and not one issue.. Actually I did have one at the start, the hose wasnt in properly one day and I put the air to the pump and the hose came out spraying myself and the two mates took off like scolded cats...

Never happened again though. Lol..
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Reply By: Rangiephil - Tuesday, May 28, 2013 at 07:49

Tuesday, May 28, 2013 at 07:49
I am a firm supporter of VISY brand black Plastic jerry cans.
For the earlier poster, they will usually fit in steel jerry mounts as they are narrower than all other plastic jerries and fit in the steel mounts of my 1997 Camp'o'matic..

They are expensive compared to the others on the market, but well worth it.

My camper had two when I bought it, and they were AFAIK 10 years old and still good. However they were quite worn through constant rubbing, and so I bought 2 new ones , which have now been everywhere man with no problems.
Eventually all plastic ones will wear through, and even my water tank wore through where it rested on the mounts.
However steel can wear through much quicker.
Regards Philip A
AnswerID: 511986

Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Tuesday, May 28, 2013 at 20:55

Tuesday, May 28, 2013 at 20:55
G'day Phil, nothing lasts forever , it's just personal choice! Michael
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Reply By: Bazooka - Tuesday, May 28, 2013 at 12:31

Tuesday, May 28, 2013 at 12:31
I've had 3 of the steel variety for 30 years without problems, still going strong, but I've always made sure they are well-packed with padding to stop rubbing etc when I've needed to take them in the back of my vehicle. I also have a small plastic fuel "can" which I used to carry "around town" in case I was silly enough to run out (I've been veeery close on a couple of trips to Melb waiting for my favourite low-priced service station to appear lol) but have discarded it because of complaints from swmbo and cwmv about the smell, particularly on hot summer days. It's minor, but it's there. No such problems with the metal jerries although I think I'll have to invest in a Tanami pump. Beats lifting the jerry.
AnswerID: 512002

Reply By: Member - Ed C (QLD) - Tuesday, May 28, 2013 at 14:49

Tuesday, May 28, 2013 at 14:49
Among others, I have several ex-army steel jerry cans, a few of which are dated 1952, which makes them more than 60 years old, and some of them have been in my possession for at least 30 years...

I have absolutely no doubt that these will outlast me, and probably my grandkids as well, as long as sensible storage practices are observed....

No prizes for guessin' which way I lean ;-))

Of the currently available 'modern' renditions, IMO the ones sold under the "ProQuip" label (made in Latvia) are as good as they get...
The only problem I have with these is the price! (if buying new)
However, they often turn up at swap meets, Tender Center, and the like, and I've picked up a few of these in 'as new' condition for an average of around $15 ea..

As mentioned aboved above, seals are available at SuperCheap (and no doubt elsewhere), and I've found these (ProQuip brand) to be the pick of the bunch, w/- no failures to date, and they fit the older military cans quite OK... I've been less than impressed with some of the no-name seals I've picked up at camping stores in the past... (YMMV)

That's not to say I have anything against plastics (I have a few of those as well ;-)), but when travelling, I take the steelies..........


:)




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....Not necessarily mechanic!!"

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AnswerID: 512016

Reply By: garytee - Tuesday, May 28, 2013 at 15:13

Tuesday, May 28, 2013 at 15:13
Thank you for everyone's views. Very helpful - and confusing.
The main reason I was considering metal was so that I could lock the filler-lid.
AnswerID: 512017

Reply By: Battler - Wednesday, May 29, 2013 at 15:14

Wednesday, May 29, 2013 at 15:14
My personal preference is for good quality poly jerry cans or fuel tanks for that matter ,the reason being that here in the top end the humidity causes condensation in metal containers very quickly . This will lead to fuel contaminated with water and rust ,and today's modern engines diesel or petrol fuel contamination is the death to the engine. So at the slight risk of splitting a poly jerry can they are a far better way of carring your extra fuel ,you can see inside them and spot water ect straight away . If it does come to the worst case and you loose some fuel your vechicle is still in one piece and generaly up here some body will come along help you and get you going . Better than a very expensive recovery and repair bill . Doug
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