Polyair Bellows

Submitted: Wednesday, Sep 04, 2013 at 17:00
ThreadID: 104182 Views:2341 Replies:7 FollowUps:2
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Does anyone on here have any experience good or bad with Polyair Black series Bellows?
Find a link to them here
www.polyair.com.au
I am contemplating putting them on my Troopy but was talking to a guy today who said he had seen cracking on the chassis rail as a result of these.
Thanks in anticipation!
Marcus
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Reply By: racinrob - Wednesday, Sep 04, 2013 at 17:45

Wednesday, Sep 04, 2013 at 17:45
G'day Marcus, I ran the PolyAir bellows for many years on my trayback 1HZ carrying a heavy slide-on camper all over Oz without any problems. They were brilliant, ended body roll where the wheels touched the chassis in really rough going and also rear end sag due to the extra weight.
I think all the talk about chassis rails cracking concerns lighter vehicles ???

rr
AnswerID: 517632

Reply By: Dust-Devil - Wednesday, Sep 04, 2013 at 18:10

Wednesday, Sep 04, 2013 at 18:10
Been running them on a 1997 3t+ Troopy for 13 years and given them a most severe flogging. Compressed them so hard one time that they folded up the top mounting plate and bent the top mounting bracket - But did not burst. They are as tough as all get out.

As the out member said: Raises the vehicle to how YOU want it, and adds to the stabilising factor.

Definitely recommend them and the Sydney Polyair distributor, Who by the way had no trouble in supplying new Top Plates and mounting brackets when I needed them.

Regards

DD
AnswerID: 517636

Reply By: Wheelie's Troopie - Wednesday, Sep 04, 2013 at 18:39

Wednesday, Sep 04, 2013 at 18:39
Thanks guys, I think I will give them a go. The pizza trailer that I will be towing all around Australia is very heavy and I want to get rid of the rear end sag so this sounds like the way to go.
AnswerID: 517639

Reply By: craigandej - Wednesday, Sep 04, 2013 at 19:38

Wednesday, Sep 04, 2013 at 19:38
I have them on my 2008 V8 troopy. Have just completed a 6 week trip to Cape York, doing the tele track on the way up. The polyairs stop the rear sagging that's for sure. Only downside is I think it may have restricted my full length suspension travel a bit, and made the troopy less flexible, resulting in a wheel off the ground a few times. The lockers made up for any shortcomings in that area though.

Cheers
AnswerID: 517640

Follow Up By: Member - Leigh (Vic) - Wednesday, Sep 04, 2013 at 20:16

Wednesday, Sep 04, 2013 at 20:16
Have to agree with you here. I'd also suggest that the ride is not so supple such that I turned them out for lifted springs that tidied things up all round.
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Reply By: Member -Pinko (NSW) - Thursday, Sep 05, 2013 at 08:15

Thursday, Sep 05, 2013 at 08:15
Forget the Bellows and install SAX rear springs.
I have been down the bellows track where the required PSI at instalation was 35 and as the original springs sagged 50 PSI was required to achieve level ride and that ride was hard,hard,hard.
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Reply By: Member - Alastair D (NSW) - Thursday, Sep 05, 2013 at 08:57

Thursday, Sep 05, 2013 at 08:57
Marcus,
I have happily used polyairs on 2 vehicles. Make sure you have your suspension sorted before using them. They are intended to allow for varying load not to correct for sagged, tired springs.
In my 100 series they nicely cope with the difference between solo empty drive and a trip with 4 adults, gear, camper trailer, 270l of fuel and all the rest.
Cheers
AnswerID: 517670

Follow Up By: Member -Pinko (NSW) - Thursday, Sep 05, 2013 at 12:39

Thursday, Sep 05, 2013 at 12:39
Hi Alistair
I assume you have polyairs inside your coils.
Wheelie has leaf springs and the air bag application and fitting is a different kettle of fish.
Cheers
Stan
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Reply By: Member - Alastair D (NSW) - Thursday, Sep 05, 2013 at 13:53

Thursday, Sep 05, 2013 at 13:53
Marcus,
Yes I did realise the difference as we have a leaf sprung troopy too. I still believe you should have the springs set correctly before adding the bags. The leaves distribute the weight correctly to the purpose designed chassis mounts whereas the bellows do not as you know. To get maximum reliability and lessen the chance of any failure I think you should get the leaves right first for normal ride height especially as you plan to tow a heavy trailer.

I came across a Toyota ute in the Kimberley years ago with a broken rear main leaf just near the eye. I was very surprised but when I looked he had a heavy load, tired springs and 'helper springs' which seem to me to be adding a lot of strain to the ends of the main. We got him going again with a log and lots of fencing wire.

cheers
AnswerID: 517680

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