Air Compressor Non return valve

Submitted: Wednesday, Feb 11, 2004 at 16:33
ThreadID: 10457 Views:4996 Replies:3 FollowUps:5
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All this talk about compressors and air tanks lately has reminded me that I must get around to putting a non-return valve on my "system" to take the pressure off the compressor once it has pumped it up to the 100psi cut-off.
I live in a rural SA town with 4 different tractor-type places and none of them knew what I was talking about.
Does anybody know where I can get a non-return valve to put on my MaxAir compressor's outlet so that the system (ie: air tank and lines) will have the pressure, but not the compressor. It may also solve the reason why my pressure drops about 25psi every 24 hours, as it could be air sneaking back past the compressor's rings?
Any ideas will be gladly listened to.
Cheers,
Roachie
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Reply By: Member -Bob & Lex (Sydney) - Wednesday, Feb 11, 2004 at 16:58

Wednesday, Feb 11, 2004 at 16:58
Try a truck spares place Roachie, (looks like being a slow web night again)Regards Bob
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AnswerID: 46364

Follow Up By: Roachie - Wednesday, Feb 11, 2004 at 17:46

Wednesday, Feb 11, 2004 at 17:46
Thanks Bob,
Once I thought a bit more about it I decided to do a Google search and found a mob called SMC Pneumatics. They have a web site:
www.ferret.com.au
They have various devices ones of which I have ordered over the phone. Cost will be $41- + GST and postage from Adelaide.
They have a Sydney office too.
Phones are Sydney = 02 9354 8222
Adelaide = 08 8346 1322
Thanks for your idea, but trucking places are a bit thin on the ground here.
Cheers,
Roachie
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FollowupID: 308240

Follow Up By: Member - DOZER- Thursday, Feb 12, 2004 at 12:11

Thursday, Feb 12, 2004 at 12:11
Hi
SMC will be able to help. The non return valve might have been a bit techo for them, it is also called a check valve, or non return check valve.
I work with alot of this stuff, if you have problems getting one, email me and i will post you one. All i need is a thread size, or if you are unsure, measure the diameter of it and i will work it out.
Andrewwheredayathinkwer mike?
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FollowupID: 308333

Reply By: Member - Eskimo - Thursday, Feb 12, 2004 at 12:06

Thursday, Feb 12, 2004 at 12:06
Non return valves are commonly called "check valves" alstry air compressers companies or Blackwoods @regency park but as you say any Pneumatic companies should also be able to help Wow, am I cute! The extra long legs are built-in prevention against ducks disease. Great looks and a real goer. Doesnt waddle along like some.
AnswerID: 46446

Follow Up By: Roachie - Thursday, Feb 12, 2004 at 12:23

Thursday, Feb 12, 2004 at 12:23
Thanks Andrew and Eskimo for your assistance.
Living in the bush is great, but these are the rare times when it would be nice to be able to drop into one of these places in the big smoke and just pick up what I need.
Is there another name for what I call an "air solenoid"? It's the type of 12volt activated , momentary contact switch which allows an immediate blast of compressed air to activate my air horns. The set of Grand Vitesse horns I have, have got 2 of these; one above each trumpet. It would be nice to have a couple of spares; plus I also have another, larger horn which needs one of these if I ever decide to fit it.
I could never go back to using those piddly FIAMM type air horns after having used these truck/train like jobbies.
Thanks for any assistance.
Cheers,
Roachie
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FollowupID: 308335

Follow Up By: Member - Eskimo - Thursday, Feb 12, 2004 at 12:48

Thursday, Feb 12, 2004 at 12:48
an electrical operated valve for passing of fluids or air are commonly called "solenoid valve". Just make sure that it has a coil for the desired voltage and the unit is capable of allowing the correct ammount of volume thru the body of the valve when energised.
as a general rule only : if the feed line is 1/2 inch then use a 1/2 inch valve. But idealy the valve should be selected on volume needed to pass thru as these types of valves (some more than others) can have high pressure drops (resistance). Wow, am I cute! The extra long legs are built-in prevention against ducks disease. Great looks and a real goer. Doesnt waddle along like some.
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FollowupID: 308338

Reply By: G.T. - Monday, Feb 16, 2004 at 17:09

Monday, Feb 16, 2004 at 17:09
Roachie ----- another thing to consider is a water drain valve on your tank. All truck tanks have these, presumably to stop internal corrosion due to water being trapped in the tank . Regards G.T.
AnswerID: 46914

Follow Up By: Roachie - Monday, Feb 16, 2004 at 17:37

Monday, Feb 16, 2004 at 17:37
GT:
Thanks mate. My 3lt tank is bolted vertically to the top left side of my cargo barrier, just above the compressor. It has 3 holes facing downwards, one of which is used for a hose about a metre long back to the rear of the cargo area. I used to only have a RYCO snap fitting on this, but on the weekend I also fitted a "T" piece to the RYCO and then fitted a pressure release valve. Before this new fitting was installed, I used to occasionally snap my air "gun" into the outlet and drain the tank. Being lower than the tank, gravity would ensure that any water would be expelled.
Of the other 2 holes in the tank, one is to (or from) the compressor and the other leads up the front of the truck using thinner 1/8" hard plastic air hose with push-on fittings.
Cheers,
Roachie
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FollowupID: 308907

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