Carrying spares on trailer wheel arch

Submitted: Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 17:15
ThreadID: 104701 Views:1884 Replies:4 FollowUps:7
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Hi all,

Is there any problem with carrying spare wheels on the wheel arch of the trailer? There is currently a jerry can holder on either side of the wheel arch on both sides (i.e. 4 holders). My plan is to carry a spare in front of the wheel arch on each side (i.e. spare, wheel arch, jerry can). The trailer can open at the front and back so I'd rather not use the drawbar and there would only be room there for 1 spare anyway.

Thanks for your wisdom...
Michael
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Reply By: Herbal - Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 17:32

Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 17:32
Sounds OK to me :)

As long as you are not oversized per the regs of the State you are in. :)

As long as the wheel arch is strong enough to take the load, all is good...Think of caravans, they actually build cupboards over the wheel arch and call it "innovative storage design".

It would even add to your stability by keeping your load on the axle line.
AnswerID: 519651

Reply By: The Bantam - Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 19:12

Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 19:12
your plan of carrying a spare on the side of the trailer is quite reasonable and commonly done.

More reasonable in fact than carrying jerries there.

It is perfecly legal to carry jerries there as long as they contain water or diesel fuel, but unless there is a solid structure surrounding them carrying petrol there is illegal.

As long as the wheels are properly attached and they do not protrude beyond the mudguards, it should be all fine and beaut.

cheers
AnswerID: 519654

Reply By: Batt's - Monday, Oct 14, 2013 at 01:37

Monday, Oct 14, 2013 at 01:37
Any room underneath to make a bracket you might be able to fit 2 under there slide 1 in behind the other out of the sun, away from wandering eyes as well just a thought.
AnswerID: 519668

Follow Up By: member - mazcan - Monday, Oct 14, 2013 at 14:54

Monday, Oct 14, 2013 at 14:54
hi
your idea has a plus as far as security and sun protection goes
but it would place the weight behind the axle and create a whipping action causing a-frame fractures and /or metal fatigue on rough rds
placing them either side rear and front of wheel arches is more even distribution and less likely to evolve into breakages providing the box section and a-frame is strong enough
cheers
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FollowupID: 799885

Follow Up By: member - mazcan - Monday, Oct 14, 2013 at 14:59

Monday, Oct 14, 2013 at 14:59
spares underneath rear would also greatly reduce departure angle clearance for off-road driving
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Follow Up By: Batt's - Tuesday, Oct 15, 2013 at 09:12

Tuesday, Oct 15, 2013 at 09:12
How can you claim it would create a whipping action and lol metal fatigue etc when you don't know how long or how much weight he has in front or behind the axle or have you inspected and weighed it for him already. As for losing ground clearance it depends where you position it how high the trailer sits how wide the tyres are did I mention putting it right at the rear of the trailer NO I said underneath don't be to quick to assume things it was a suggestion.
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FollowupID: 799954

Follow Up By: member - mazcan - Tuesday, Oct 15, 2013 at 16:33

Tuesday, Oct 15, 2013 at 16:33
hi batt's
it is a well known fact that poor distribution of weight in both caravans and trailers causes the a/frames to crack and also depending on the material they are built with
I have had experience with both a single axle van and a trailer cracking their a/frames due to too much weight been carried behind the rear axle which causes a wipping action which leads to metal fatigue and cracking
the original poster quoted he didn't want to place anything on the drawbar as the front and rear tailgates are the opening type
he also thanked us for wisdom in advance
which I have offered based on my experiences and facts based on the knowledge of many others who have also had simular problems
you suggested he could place a bracket underneath and slide one wheel in behind the other
in my mine that would place the second tyres rearward edge close to 1mtr behind the axle therefore placing the weight in a situation that could lead to what I have described above and also may impede departure angles
so I wasn't assuming anything and was a summary based on what you suggested and what the op had stated
using capitals is classed as shouting on this site and and
I fail to see any reason for that
i wasn't condemning your suggestion but merely pointing out the pitfalls that have and can occur
and was simply passing an opinion and trying to help the op
that what this site is party to
cheers
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FollowupID: 799984

Follow Up By: Batt's - Tuesday, Oct 15, 2013 at 23:45

Tuesday, Oct 15, 2013 at 23:45
AND WHY WOULD SOMEONE LISTEN TO YOU WHEN YOU CLEARLY DON'T PRACTICE WEIGHT DISTRIBUTION YOURSELF HOW THE HELL CAN YOU BREAK 2 VANS DIDN'T LEARN ANYTHING WHEN YOU BROKE THE FIRST ONE I EXPECT. YOU STILL MISSED IT DIDN'T SAY FROM THE REAR OF THE TRAILER I LEFT THAT OPTION OPEN BY JUST SAYING UNDERNEATH I CAN'T HELP YOU IF YOU GET IT STUCK IN YOUR HEAD THERE IS ONLY ONE WAY TO DO THAT YOU CAN MAKE A BRACKET THAT GOES ACROSS THE VEHICLE AND SLIDE THEM IN FROM ONE SIDE WHICH WOULD BE THE PASSENGER SIDE TO KEEP YOU OFF THE ROAD AWAY FROM TRAFFIC WHO WOULD HAVE THOUGHT. SORRY IF IT UPSETS YOU THAT I SUGGESTED STORING THEM UNDERNEATH DID YOU HAVE A GO AT TOYOTA FOR DOING THAT TO THE 60 SER IN 1980 AND ALL OF THE OTHER CAR MANUFACTURES. BIG LETTERS CLASSED AS SHOUTING WHAT A LOAD OF CRAP NEVER HEARD SUCH RUBBISH
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Follow Up By: Bonz (Vic) - Wednesday, Oct 16, 2013 at 20:03

Wednesday, Oct 16, 2013 at 20:03
Are you shouting Batt's?
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Follow Up By: BarryR1 - Wednesday, Oct 16, 2013 at 23:26

Wednesday, Oct 16, 2013 at 23:26
Strewth, Batts, YOU NEED TO GET OUT MORE OFTEN!!!! Mate/Matette, that sort of response is way over the mark. Unwarranted, and dare I say unwanted. I can only hope that judging by the time you posted, you made an error under the influence of something that came from a bottle, was red and had an alcohol content of better than 10%.

Chill out or you'll burst a valve! You are adding absolutely no value to this conversation, and the website!

Baz.
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FollowupID: 800120

Reply By: Mick O - Thursday, Oct 17, 2013 at 00:02

Thursday, Oct 17, 2013 at 00:02
Hi Mike, look this has the potential to be a great idea but you need to consider your travel requirements and the strength of the trailer when compared to those requirements.

Some famous general of WWII (Monty I think) said that even the best laid plans only last as long as the first encounter with the enemy! Sage advice for outback travel when the enemy is always outback road conditions!

If you intend travelling on bitumen roads with your trailer then you'll never have a problem. If you intend to travel even a seemingly benign outback track like the Oodnadatta or Birdsville track, then you will need to ensure that the trailer is built with robustness and support in mind. I built mine exactly as you intend and thought it would be perfect....it lasted less than one day's encounter with the hardships of the Giles-Mulga Park Road...rough but not extreme by any stretch of the imagination.

Every drum is at least 15kgs thumping up and down on metal supports at every corrugation or bump. Plan accordingly and ensure that side supports are reinforced and gusseted to the n'th degree lest you end up in a situation like I did. Trailers always cop a pounding and even more so if they don't have shocks. This will have a telling effect on the overhanging extremities like sides and guards.








Cheers Mick.

''We knew from the experience of well-known travelers that the
trip would doubtless be attended with much hardship.''
Richard Maurice - 1903

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