My 4wd Not fitted with Electric Brake/Controller

Submitted: Monday, Oct 21, 2013 at 19:04
ThreadID: 104812 Views:3752 Replies:6 FollowUps:11
This Thread has been Archived
G'day, I'm picking up an 18ft Caravan on the South Coast NSW. It has electric brakes. I have to fit a Brake plug & Controller to my Troop Carrier. Does it have to be the same brand/type as the Caravan has or is there a good quality universal one? What's the cost of having it installed these days?
regards Jimmay
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Geoff in SA - Monday, Oct 21, 2013 at 19:12

Monday, Oct 21, 2013 at 19:12
jimmy
Do a search on Electric Brake Controllers and have a read.
there are many Q and A on the subject.
Prodigy is a good all round unit.
Cost depends on who installs it

Regards
Geoff
AnswerID: 520123

Reply By: Member - KEITH W (QLD) - Monday, Oct 21, 2013 at 20:03

Monday, Oct 21, 2013 at 20:03
prodigy is a good one, cost me about $140 + fitting, about a hours work.

cheers
keith
AnswerID: 520124

Follow Up By: FAX - Monday, Oct 21, 2013 at 20:11

Monday, Oct 21, 2013 at 20:11
thanks Keith
if I fit the Prodigy, can I tow any average length caravan with most types of electric brakes?

regards Jimmy
0
FollowupID: 800526

Follow Up By: olcoolone - Tuesday, Oct 22, 2013 at 08:04

Tuesday, Oct 22, 2013 at 08:04
About an hours work?....... would love to see the job.

Most take us about 3 hrs minimum.

BTW have you installed on in about an hour yourself?
1
FollowupID: 800568

Follow Up By: Member - KEITH W (QLD) - Tuesday, Oct 22, 2013 at 09:51

Tuesday, Oct 22, 2013 at 09:51
no problem with the job, also installed a live wire to plug to charge battery on travelling. maybe some are ripping people off with 3 hours labour, there are only a few wires to connect......

cheers
keith
1
FollowupID: 800577

Follow Up By: olcoolone - Tuesday, Oct 22, 2013 at 10:23

Tuesday, Oct 22, 2013 at 10:23
Got to love DIYers.

Yeah I know we have even had customer who said they could a job in 1/4 the time that we do it in..... Don't know why it took them 2days to do 4hrs of work...... How one looses track of their time function.

But then again, if you do it your self you don't have to worry about quality, looks and reliability nor do you have to spend 40 minutes talking, explaining to the know it all custom on how it works and testing it on there wrongly wired trailer with non adjusted brakes..... Hell I love ripping customers off.

It would take me more than a hour to solder all the wires and connectors, make it into a loom in convoluted tubing and tape, P clamp or secure the loom and mount the brake controller.

Maybe we could watch you do it at an EO gathering!
2
FollowupID: 800579

Follow Up By: Member - KEITH W (QLD) - Tuesday, Oct 22, 2013 at 10:40

Tuesday, Oct 22, 2013 at 10:40
don't know what your problem is, it was not a diy job, i don't know where you got that from.
cheers
keith
1
FollowupID: 800581

Follow Up By: Tonyfish#58 - Tuesday, Oct 22, 2013 at 17:47

Tuesday, Oct 22, 2013 at 17:47
Having just fitted one myself I can safely say I would love to be able to do it in an Hour :-)

An under Dash would be Quicker than a Behind the Dash, but you still have to run a couple sets of new Wires (4 to connect) from the in cab unit through the Fire Wall on to the battery and from the Unit to rear of car and fix them all in Place. You also have to mount the unit in the dash or under the dash and solder/Shrink Wrap/Tape all the joints.

Thinking about it and I have already taken an Hour!!! ;-)

3 Hours I would leave to do this job and yes time does slip away for us DIY's - I have always done my own electrics.

Regards Tony
1
FollowupID: 800630

Reply By: Nomadic Navara - Monday, Oct 21, 2013 at 21:31

Monday, Oct 21, 2013 at 21:31
Jimmay, all vans have electric brakes with similar magnets in their brakes. The main difference between vans is the current drawn by the brakes. A twin axle van requires roughly twice the current and a tri-axle van requires three times. This is a rule of thumb, there will be a little difference depending on weight but there is as adjusting control on every brake controller to compensate for this. Most brake controllers will provide sufficient power for all vans, the exception is there are a few of the older ones that will only suit two axle vans.

The main thing to watch is that there ar two types of controller:

1 The proportional controllers have a sensing element in them that detects how quickly you are slowing and apply the correct amount of current to the van to match the van brakes with those of the tug. (The control element is sometimes a pendulum that requires a once only set-up and others use a self levelling decelerometer.)

2 There are some old technology controllers that are called synchroniser, timer or digital controllers. They apply a small level of current which builds up over a few seconds of time up to a maximum that you have pre-set with the adjustment on them. They do not provide full braking at the commencement of emergency stop situations. When you are coming to a gentle stop the controller will produce maximum braking (after the build up time) whether you want it or not.

I would suggest you purchase a proportional type controller and not one of the other. All current Tekonsha controllers are proportional types.

The above shows how the two types of controllers act.
PeterD
Retired radio and electronics technician

Lifetime Member
My Profile  Send Message

AnswerID: 520141

Follow Up By: Nomadic Navara - Monday, Oct 21, 2013 at 21:37

Monday, Oct 21, 2013 at 21:37
To read the text in the above, hold the Control key down whilst pressing the " + " key a few times. To restore your browser window to normal, hold the Control key down and press the " - " key the same number of times you did the " + " key.
PeterD
Retired radio and electronics technician

Lifetime Member
My Profile  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 800544

Reply By: The Bantam - Monday, Oct 21, 2013 at 22:36

Monday, Oct 21, 2013 at 22:36
Unless it is an obscure brake system, a standard electric brake controller should be fine.
Most of the basic controllers will deal with 2 axles and 4 electric drums.

what you need to make sure of is the type of plug used and that it is wired correctly.

OH and when getting the brake controller installed make sure the wiring used is, as specified, particularly the cable between the battery and the controller and the wire between the controller and the plug on the back of the vehicle.

I have heard of all sorts of butcherous things being done.....like pickinng up a supply from the ciggy lighter..and plenty of people will try and tell you the wire does not need to be as heavy as the manufacturers specify


OH and don't wast you money on a controller that is not proportional.

If an electric brake system and trailer is properly set up, you'll have to get ya Mrs to hold ya eyeballs in if you try an emergency stop.

cheers
AnswerID: 520147

Reply By: Sand Man (SA) - Tuesday, Oct 22, 2013 at 07:13

Tuesday, Oct 22, 2013 at 07:13
Just one word of caution on the proportional (Prodigy) type brake controllers.
You need plenty of room between the dash and your knees.

I could not fit one for this reason and chose a non-proportional controller that could be mounted out of the way.

The Redarc Remote Head controller I fitted works extremely well and despite the lack of proportional braking as mentioned above, is efficient in its operation when adjusted correctly.

The control box is fitted away from knees, etc. and only the adjuster knob and indicator light is mounted in a convenient location.

Bill


I'm diagonally parked in a parallel Universe!

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 520156

Follow Up By: Griff61 - Wednesday, Oct 23, 2013 at 17:07

Wednesday, Oct 23, 2013 at 17:07
I agree with you Sandman the redarc is great. I have it and when you work out its settings its great.
1
FollowupID: 800673

Reply By: FAX - Wednesday, Oct 23, 2013 at 18:24

Wednesday, Oct 23, 2013 at 18:24
Thank you Folk for the great views, from which I can now make some better informed judgements. It seems to me that the 2 types mentioned need to be installed diligently. More research on my part...
regards Jimmy
AnswerID: 520256

Follow Up By: Member - Andrew & Jen - Wednesday, Oct 23, 2013 at 18:40

Wednesday, Oct 23, 2013 at 18:40
Hullo Jimmy
For me an essential feature is being able to actuate the trailer brakes independently (by hand)
This allows you to use the trailer brakes to keep both the tow vehicle and trailer in a straight line going down hill in slippery conditions.
Cheers
Andrew
1
FollowupID: 800680

Follow Up By: Tonyfish#58 - Wednesday, Oct 23, 2013 at 21:28

Wednesday, Oct 23, 2013 at 21:28
I have a new Redarc remote head mounted in my car that I will not need. My trailer ended up with Electric Over Hydraulic which the redarc will not operate.

It has not been used and is just decorating one of my pull out switch spaces - It is one of these.....

Redarc

MM me if you wish to partake of a bargain :-)

Regards Tony
1
FollowupID: 800690

Follow Up By: The Bantam - Wednesday, Oct 23, 2013 at 23:25

Wednesday, Oct 23, 2013 at 23:25
FAX mate......regardless of the controller you end up with...diligent installation is imperitave.

cheers
1
FollowupID: 800694

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)