Scam reminder. Not all 4WD but I think it is worth a post

Submitted: Monday, Oct 28, 2013 at 16:29
ThreadID: 104897 Views:2628 Replies:8 FollowUps:25
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I just received the amail below. It is bogus and a scam. Just a tidy reminder to all. Okay.

Paypal and any other reasonably security conscious site will always ask you to go to the site and log in. They will NOT provide a link for you to do so. You must use your own means.

Personally I do not use links in emails anyway, unless I am 1000% sure of the source of the email. A quick way of checking the sender is to look at the Properties or Options for an email. In some email programs you can do this by selecting the email and then a right click on the mouse. Don't know about smart phones etc. Just normal computers. Not knowing what you would be using all I can say is from then look for the raw data of the email header and scroll it. Look for words like From or Sender.

Permanently delete these emails.
.
Phil

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Reply By: Member - PJR (NSW) - Monday, Oct 28, 2013 at 16:32

Monday, Oct 28, 2013 at 16:32
This may be better.

AnswerID: 520521

Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Monday, Oct 28, 2013 at 17:46

Monday, Oct 28, 2013 at 17:46
Hi Phil,

From those fuzzy images it would seem that the Internal Lens of your computer is out off adjustment.
Just click on THIS LINK and it will open a free facility which will allow you to adjust the focus. LOL
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Member - PJR (NSW) - Monday, Oct 28, 2013 at 18:44

Monday, Oct 28, 2013 at 18:44
Allan, Allan, Allan me old mate

Do you really think that I am so stupid as to click on a link in your post. Ha.

Phil
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Follow Up By: Bazooka - Monday, Oct 28, 2013 at 18:52

Monday, Oct 28, 2013 at 18:52
Expect a phone call soon from the "Windows Support Centre" to fix your focusing problem Phil.
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Follow Up By: Member - PJR (NSW) - Monday, Oct 28, 2013 at 18:56

Monday, Oct 28, 2013 at 18:56
After what I have to do stuffing around with file sizes and editors I could be bothered fixing it mate. I figured that you would need something to nit pick me on. Hmmmmm Would I bait anyone!

Phil
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Monday, Oct 28, 2013 at 20:47

Monday, Oct 28, 2013 at 20:47
Phiiiiill, maaaaate, would I offer you a dodgy link?

Besides, I'm not technically capable of it. LOL

Go on, click on it. You will be pleasantly surprised.
Cheers
Allan

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Reply By: Herbal - Monday, Oct 28, 2013 at 17:18

Monday, Oct 28, 2013 at 17:18
The screen shot you have posted certainly does not look like a genuine Paypal email...No argument there.

However, both Paypal and their parent company eBay, do include direct links in their emails. It will usually show as a 'button' saying "pay now" or "view this transaction". They include other direct links taking you to their web site pages.

As for your comment "Paypal and any other reasonably security conscious site" goes. If you REALLY believe that Paypal gives a rats bum about your security, then more fool you !!!

If you really want to see just how much Paypal thinks of your security...Just print off a copy of their Buyer Protection and Seller Protection policies...put them side by side and compare...Then compare that with their legal obligation to be unambiguous which you can find in the Code of Conduct they claim to abide by !!!

Just like any other of these so called secure online payment sites, Paypal is nothing more than a credit card handler. That is the be all and end all of what they do...They allow you to buy something online without actually giving your credit card details directly to the seller.

That would be pretty much all the nice things I can think of saying about Paypal...:)

I use this site - http://network-tools.com/ - to check email and web sites. It might look a little confusing but it is not. On the left you will see a box and directly under the box a "go" button. Simple paste (or type) the email or web address you want to check into the box and click "go".
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Follow Up By: Member - PJR (NSW) - Monday, Oct 28, 2013 at 17:36

Monday, Oct 28, 2013 at 17:36
Yes It is definitely not from Paypal. There are a bundle of indicators proving so. But the casual trusting user could do as asked in the email. That is the person that I am hoping will get something good out of this thread.

You really have a gripe with paypal don't you. Wont bother discussing it with you then.

Phil

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Follow Up By: Herbal - Monday, Oct 28, 2013 at 17:52

Monday, Oct 28, 2013 at 17:52
Yes, Phil I do have a gripe..

My apologies, I am out of line.

I am only into day 4 of a 30 day ban from the eBay forum...and when I saw the word "paypal" steam did need to vent :) I usually only get a 7 day ban...I must have spoken some real truths close to the bone this time, to get 30 day ban :) haha !

I realise where you are coming from. That is why I included the link for network tools. So that trusting users can check for them selves.

Again, please accept my apologies...I was out of line.

If it helps at all...My golden rule is "If I am not expecting to get it - then it is spam - so check it".
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Follow Up By: Member - PJR (NSW) - Monday, Oct 28, 2013 at 18:54

Monday, Oct 28, 2013 at 18:54
I do not need an apology. I just wont discuss it. That's another topic. You did not do anything against me. So we move on. Okay?

At least we have some viewers who are getting a reminder about security, which is all I wish of this thread.

Phil
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Reply By: Member - gujimbo - Monday, Oct 28, 2013 at 17:31

Monday, Oct 28, 2013 at 17:31
Just got the same email, if you hover your mouse over the active link in the body of the email you can see that it points to some sh@t h*^e in India.

Into the rubbish bin for this one.

Cheers
AnswerID: 520524

Follow Up By: Member - PJR (NSW) - Monday, Oct 28, 2013 at 17:38

Monday, Oct 28, 2013 at 17:38
Excellent. They are very trying sometimes. But it is so easy to detect the bogus ones by the suspicious souls.

Phil
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Reply By: Motherhen - Monday, Oct 28, 2013 at 23:24

Monday, Oct 28, 2013 at 23:24
Hi Phil

I get a number of spam/scam emails "from" PayPal and eBay. Send them to spoof@paypal.com.au and spoof@ebay.com.au. A robot will write and thank you for it and say it is a phishing attempt, and I doubt a human ever sees it. I also get them "from" my ISP with a genuine Westnet email address, wanting me to confirm my details or I will have my account shut down. Yeah right. Add these to those numerous bank accounts I have all over the world that want me to confirm my details. I have spam screening on my emails, but lots get through. Easy to add them to the blocked sender list. Then I have inherited millions and am the only person in the world they can find with my surname (which they don't know) to give it to. Gee my delete key is practically worn out LOL.

Mh
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Follow Up By: Member - PJR (NSW) - Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013 at 06:08

Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013 at 06:08
Hi Mh

And don't we all. I did out the senders address and add it to a function (a Rule in Outlook) that automatically deletes the emails from addressees, with certain words, phrases, advertisments, international banks etc. There are a lot of combinations. They still come but the delete key is safe from being worn out. We will never rid the internet of them.

It's the cyber worlds version of all those weedy looking individuals who man the sidewalks and offer all manner of things to the passing tourist. We just walk by. Well scam wise internet users just delete the emails. But some tourists will get curious and think that "One peek wont hurt". oops. yes it will.

Yes, you and the previous respondees know what to do. This was just meant to be a reminder to the user who could, without thinking, just have a quick peek and click that button. No more. No less.

I could redirect the ebay and paypal ones to spoof@ etc, but where do you stop and I do not have any confidence in that action doing any good. So they are simply deleted.

Happy days.

Phil
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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013 at 11:14

Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013 at 11:14
Most of us know how to recognise them, but they must catch some people or they wouldn't persist. This morning I received this "from" my ISP. The person is using a genuine Westnet account. Westnet has been notified.

"Dear Email User,

Your email account is due for upgrade.

Kindly upgrade immediately to avoid account shut down / suspension.


Download the attachment and follow the instruction to upgrade.


System Administrator"


Motherhen

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Follow Up By: Member - PJR (NSW) - Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013 at 14:49

Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013 at 14:49
They aren't very inventive are they. I would hazard a guess that the email you are talking about was not even sent from that valid exact westnet address.

Just a bit of reading. Not trying to validate paypal to you but this is one way these scammers work.

Having played around at machine code level for the early years of computers it would not be hard to pick up just one email and set up a loop to automatically scan a table with millions of email addresses in it and change the destination addressee in the email and then actually send it. Then why not have a big table of good looking emails from banks, solicitors, investment organisations etc and start that loop and just rotate through the address table with each email in this table. Just let it run and come back the next day and you are a millionaire. Turn it all off and disappear for a while. Life's good you think.

However, in all this phishing and multiple emails the one thing that is very hard to duplicate is linking an email address to your correct name or even a userid in all those millions of emails. It can be done but it is labour intensive and crooks are lazy. That's why if you ever get an email supposedly from paypal or ebay you should look for your name and/or your userid. If neither are there then dump the email. I just went through a bundle from them and in all cases my name and/or userid is in the email. You should also be able to go to the paypal and ebay site and see the email there if it is valid.

I don't use many sites so I am not positive if they also have messages.

Let the user beware. Preferably very, very, suspicious. Would you let me look at your wallet.

Phil
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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013 at 15:20

Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013 at 15:20
Hi Phil, this one was from a Westnet address, as if it is from something else it shows in the Message Options. I have had a few like that.

My email address has been used for spamming, as sometimes I will get a rash of bounce messages from defunct email addresses from overseas and I know "I" have been spamming Russia again. They must send out a huge volume of spam, because the sheer volume of just the bounce notifications coming in block my emails for about two days. All the harder when we were travelling and had limited internet time.

I have received spam email 'from' eBay and it was sent to the email address I use for eBay and included my eBay ID. eBay did not want to about the hacking probability. Most eBay and Paypal spam/scams come to the wrong email address as I have several for different purposes.

Mh
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Follow Up By: Member - PJR (NSW) - Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013 at 16:06

Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013 at 16:06
MH

It's simple to change the senders email address. Just like sending someone snail mail and writing someone else's address on the back of the envelope. Remember how you used to turn them over to see who sent you a card at Chrissy.

Never had my email address used for scamming etc like that. That would be a pain. If you use Outlook or Outlook Express do you know how to use the Rules function. Next time you start to get a bunch leave them in the inbox and set up a rule to delete them automatically using a phrase that is common to all as the trigger or filter.

A pain never the less. And kind of like an invasion of your space.

That dedicated email address is not a bad idea. So if ebay messages go to an address other than the one you use in ebay then a rule could also be set up to automatically delete them as well.

The emails with your user id and correct ebay address in them. Could they have been a drop copy from ebay of a message sent to you through the internal ebay messaging system. If so then they are legit so no problem. I wonder.

Anyway we try to help people learn to look after themselves. Thats all we try.

Phil
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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013 at 16:19

Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013 at 16:19
eBay is probably the most hacked site there is Phil. Paypal can also get hacked.

Yes I use Outlook, but do not use auto delete as it can sometimes delete something I don't intend it to. That way I can screen mail in the Junk box before obliteration.

For those who blithely send on the 'latest' joke or 'health revelation' to all in their mailbox leaving all addresses there, I send this

Motherhen

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Follow Up By: Member - PJR (NSW) - Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013 at 16:36

Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013 at 16:36
MH I am not saying you are wrong but . . .

That bit about ebay as "probably the most hacked site there is" seems a little way out. Does that mean that the hackers have actually gained entry to ebay or just that it is the most one actually attacked without entry being gained. There is a big difference. If it truly was the most hacked and entry gained site then I would say they would have to close up shop. You just couldn't operate with so much hacking going on. The financial risk would be too great. The insurer would demand it.

As far as chain mail or jokes are concerned. I just delete them. Don't even read past the subject or first line. I don't care where they came from. Sue wouldn't pass them on either and I am not on speaking terms as yet with the Pope.

We are just so careful and suspicious of every "good looking" or "attractive" thing on the internet.

Phil
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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013 at 16:45

Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013 at 16:45
Yes Phil, probably over the top as I have no comparative data on other sites, but it is a phrase used by regular eBayers, as individual eBay accounts can and do get hacked into. Daughter even had her Paypal account hacked once - and it MAY have been in 'inside job' to get past the Paypal security.

Mh
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Follow Up By: Member - PJR (NSW) - Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013 at 17:00

Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013 at 17:00
We use these: PayPal Security Key for both ebay and paypal. Handy buying from overseas retail outlets as well and paying with Paypal.

Ours cost only $7 back when they first came out. Having worked with crypto devices in RASIGS for 18 years, I can recommend get one. We have never had a single issue among four family members who use of Paypal on a regular basis. Works on Ebay as well. Sue has a similar device for her internet banking and remote log in to work.

Phil
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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013 at 17:09

Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013 at 17:09
Yes, daughter has them for eBay and Paypal and I have used them with bank accounts when working off farm. With Paypal, what was suspicious was that the account was hacked the day a large refund went in. A purchase was invoiced incorrectly, reversed, and then re-charged later. It took her a lot of phone calls and grief to get the money back, while one part of PayPal acknowledged that it is gone missing but didn't know where to, another part was pressing for payment of an account in deficit. Very stressful. We call it hacking, but that may not be the correct term in this case. It was a few years ago, so I can't be certain that she had the security key then.

Mh
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Follow Up By: Member - PJR (NSW) - Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013 at 18:43

Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013 at 18:43
That reversal thing is just like the banks. Quick to take it but damned slow to give it back if they have stuffed up.

Phil
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Reply By: Member - Woodsy - Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013 at 09:40

Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013 at 09:40
I had a very similar 'PayPal' email.

4 ermails to PayPal over a couple of months indicating that I believed that it was a scam email have brought no response except for a reply acknowledging receipt of my emails.

What I basically asked was "Is this a scam email?"

They don't give a R A!
Happy 4 wheeling

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Follow Up By: Member - PJR (NSW) - Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013 at 10:17

Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013 at 10:17
Hi Woodsy

Firstly I am not trying to defend paypal, ebay or whomever.

Put yourself in their boots. How many of these emails a day do you think that they would get if we all sent it to them instead of putting them in our scam etc automatic deletion facility.

So paypal would be wasting thousands of dollars for nothing. Just to spend an hour or so on each single email and then to respond to say it was a scam and make us feel happy. I wouldn't bother either. I don't consider that as "They don't give a R A!". Mate these emails have nothing to do with paypal.

I am sure that if you dig around in the help area of Paypal you will find an explanation maybe worded a bit more better than mine.

Phil
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Reply By: Member - Woodsy - Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013 at 11:34

Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013 at 11:34
Hi Phil

PayPal have an email contact number for reporting scams, phishing@paypal.com.au, that I contacted 4 times asking for their comment.

They did not reply.

Being busy is not an excuse for poor customer service.

Not replying is because you don't care.
Happy 4 wheeling

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Follow Up By: Member - PJR (NSW) - Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013 at 14:59

Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013 at 14:59
Same as the previous response. I wouldn't bother either Woodsy. Just delete them. You are safe aren't you. Then your virus checker is doing it's thing, and also the ads on TV and this type of thread is working.

Sorry mate but that's the truth of it. Time and money. Same thing why they don't always bother booking you for minor issues like headlights out of alignment, illegal lights on the roof (oops) and wearing thongs while driving (oops again). Time and money.

Try going into the local police and reporting the neighbours lights as out of alignment. Fill this form in please sir and he hands you a 20 page form to complete. Hmmmm Problem solved!! Your a bugger Constable PJR (bit of theatrical licence there).

Catchya

Phil
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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013 at 15:10

Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013 at 15:10
I send to spoof@paypal.com.au Woodsy, and always get the same automated reply.

Mh
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Reply By: scandal - Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013 at 17:35

Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013 at 17:35
Another scam involving paypal,
My Sister in law was selling her car via an evilbay related site, a person wanted her car for their son who was off shore and didn't have reliable communication, they also asked if she could drop the vehicle off to be shipped interstate after payment, they paid asking price and that they will pay via paypal, then she gets an email explaining that the payment cant go thru unless she pays $1100 for shipping upfront, but its ok the buyer will pay her $1200 on top of car purchase price to cover the extra running around, GOOD FELLA.
Get a paypal looking document to say that the payment has been made (full car price plus the $1200) with instruction on where to deposit the $1100, some transport company Ive never heard of based in Hong Kong.
google quickly showed it was a common scam that carried a familiar story, buyer wants the vehicle for some else who was at a mine, overseas, on an oil rig and so forth, some hiccup half way along during the deal that required a cash injection from the seller to resolve, but they will be re compensated with a little bit extra for the helping out,
It looked on the surface above board,
AnswerID: 520583

Follow Up By: Member - PJR (NSW) - Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013 at 18:50

Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013 at 18:50
That is not unique to Ebay. That scam is an old one. Old enough to be preinternet.

The moral is that you don't hand anything over until fully paid or take the risk. You buy a house. The bank pays the seller in full for you and takes the risk that you won't abscond. Same thing. Me never do no matter what. And the more urgent it is the slower I would be.

Bit of bad luck there mate.

What do you mean by "an evilbay related site"?

Phil
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Reply By: The Bunyip - Wednesday, Oct 30, 2013 at 15:39

Wednesday, Oct 30, 2013 at 15:39
While I know there's millions of gullible people out there (which is the very reason these scams gain traction if you'll pardon the pun) for me it's clear.

With respect to Paypal, if the email address doesn't end with either of the following it's a scam email.

@PAYPAL.COM
@PAYPAL.COM.AU

Various versions of the above such as @INTPAYPAL.COM or @PAYPALAUST.COM.AU give the appearance of legitimacy designed to fool the recipient.
AnswerID: 520631

Follow Up By: Member - PJR (NSW) - Wednesday, Oct 30, 2013 at 15:49

Wednesday, Oct 30, 2013 at 15:49
Exactly.

Phil
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