Taking food int WA

Submitted: Wednesday, Nov 06, 2013 at 06:35
ThreadID: 105009 Views:1721 Replies:10 FollowUps:7
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Hi we are planning going down the Canning next year and were wondering what people did taking food fro the east into WA. We will be coming up the Tanami track to Halls Creek and down the canning.

We usually take our own dried veg as well as fresh stuff. From reading this is not allowed so what are our options.
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Reply By: Sand Man (SA) - Wednesday, Nov 06, 2013 at 07:27

Wednesday, Nov 06, 2013 at 07:27
Peter,

Your only real option is to ensure you have used up any fresh or dried stuff, or dispose of remaining stock and rely on canned stuff, until you can replenish your stock in WA.

Easy As!

Bill


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AnswerID: 520920

Reply By: Peter W - Wednesday, Nov 06, 2013 at 07:34

Wednesday, Nov 06, 2013 at 07:34
We were asked to hand over any honey and bags that may have been used for vegetables/fruit eg, potato bag, so be aware of that as well.

Peter
AnswerID: 520921

Reply By: Member - Alan H (QLD) - Wednesday, Nov 06, 2013 at 08:01

Wednesday, Nov 06, 2013 at 08:01
Quarantine

Fresh is the no no.

Processed or frozen is usually OK see the list above.

Alan
AnswerID: 520925

Reply By: Member - Rosco from way back - Wednesday, Nov 06, 2013 at 08:26

Wednesday, Nov 06, 2013 at 08:26
Peter

The way you are travelling will take you past an unmanned bin outside Halls Creek.
It's then your responsibility to dispose of quarantine items, unlike the main roads where you go through a check-point.
AnswerID: 520927

Reply By: Member - John and Lynne - Wednesday, Nov 06, 2013 at 09:04

Wednesday, Nov 06, 2013 at 09:04
Whether there are inspectors or not at the checkpoints WA is working hard to save its agricultural industries eg they are the only state now free of a honey bee disease so it is necessary to observe the restrictions. Many people's livelihood depends on everyone doing the right thing.
When we went through the inspection point we could not take ANY fresh fruit or veg or honey. Sealed packets of dried peas and tinned food were OK.
However vegies that were peeled and cooked were fine. So before leaving SA we camped and cooked some stew and soup. For the remaining vegies we fried up chopped onion and lightly steamed potatoes, carrots and other vegies and stacked them in the fridge in plastic containers - it was amazing how much fitted in! Garlic cloves peeled and in a small jar of oil were OK. We stewed the apples and ate the bananas!
So we did not have to throw anything away and managed quite comfortably until we reached Norseman a few days later. Lynne
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Follow Up By: Member - bbuzz (NSW) - Wednesday, Nov 06, 2013 at 09:09

Wednesday, Nov 06, 2013 at 09:09
Appreciate the reasons for what they do.....

BUT how come the Woolies and Coles trucks, full of fresh produce can pass through?

bill
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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Wednesday, Nov 06, 2013 at 09:34

Wednesday, Nov 06, 2013 at 09:34
Hi Bill

For licensed importers there are strict controls, eg the honey is heat treated. It is not necessarily the same as on the shelves in the other states.

Fresh salads are about all you will miss out on once you cook up what you have and go to processed foods.

Motherhen
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Reply By: Motherhen - Wednesday, Nov 06, 2013 at 09:36

Wednesday, Nov 06, 2013 at 09:36
Hi Peter

As you are planning to go to Halls Creek, there is a small grocery store there for fresh produce.

Check ahead with the community store at Billiluna; they may well be able to provide your needs. Other travellers may know better about this option.

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Reply By: Burnin up some diesel - Wednesday, Nov 06, 2013 at 09:42

Wednesday, Nov 06, 2013 at 09:42
N if ya run out of thongs the halls creek store has cheap ones... The other thing they took off us was a half bucket of fresh yabbies I caught down the road, they weren't certain whether or not to take them until the boss came out and he salivated and his eyes lit up and said yes we we need to take those.....
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Follow Up By: Member - PJR (NSW) - Wednesday, Nov 06, 2013 at 11:08

Wednesday, Nov 06, 2013 at 11:08
You got had. I always carry a copy of this when going to WA.

Destination: Western Australia

Did you get a receipt and complain?

Phil
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Reply By: Member - PJR (NSW) - Wednesday, Nov 06, 2013 at 10:17

Wednesday, Nov 06, 2013 at 10:17
I have been led to believe that if you partly cook something then it will be fine the way you are going. BUT DO NOT take spuds down to anywhere near Wiluna and all points south west of the CSR. We will be starting in Alice and then up the Tanami to Wolfe Creek and then back down to Bililuna and the CSR.

Haven't looked much past spuds as yet because we have a freezer for vegetables (21lt Fridge dedicated as a freezer).

Phil
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Reply By: Member - PJR (NSW) - Wednesday, Nov 06, 2013 at 11:13

Wednesday, Nov 06, 2013 at 11:13
I meant to post this link earler but forgot. A handy quarantine checklist for entering WA. And from the Government as well. But whether they talk to each other or not is another matter.

Destination: Western Australia

You may find some information for the other states as well but I have not read them as yet.

Phil
AnswerID: 520935

Reply By: ExplorOz Team - Michelle - Wednesday, Nov 06, 2013 at 14:22

Wednesday, Nov 06, 2013 at 14:22
The issue some people have with quarantine always boggles me. What is wrong with buying your supplies in the state you are visiting? Yes if you're bypassing main towns in that state then fresh supplies may be limited however what we do is call ahead and find out when the locals get their fresh supplies sent up from the main supply centre. There is often a weekly supply truck that delivers to locals and/or local store. As a traveller, you can put in a private order and collect this from the depot on the given date, or ask the store to hold it for you. You can buy absolutely anything the same as you would at Woolies/Coles at home. We have done this in Birdsville, and in Wiluna. I'm sure you can do this from Halls Creek too. Hope this helps, don't mean to be rude but people living everywhere eat fresh food too.
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Follow Up By: Member - John and Lynne - Wednesday, Nov 06, 2013 at 17:32

Wednesday, Nov 06, 2013 at 17:32
Michelle I am sure most of us are happy to buy our food locally as we go and in most cases this is a simple matter. However as the original poster and others have mentioned WA poses different issues. There are long distances between quarantine checkpoints and the next shop. So travellers do need to have sufficient supplies to get them through the distance, especially if they are planning any side trips - in our case we spent a week getting from the checkpoint to the first shop at Norseman. We were caught because we had been given the wrong advice by Tourist Info at Ceduna and so spent some time cooking our fresh food before going on through the checkpoint. So quarantine can be an issue and most people want to do the right thing without running out of food. As it is the right advice has been given in answer to a sensible question. Lynne
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Follow Up By: Peter - Wednesday, Nov 06, 2013 at 18:00

Wednesday, Nov 06, 2013 at 18:00
Hi thank you all for the replies. Our issue is we are planning food for 4 weeks on the Canning Stock Route. Yes we can do the track in shorter time. We usually dehydrate all our own food to travel lightly for times we are not able to buy food locally. On finding out about the restrictions we will have to plan differently.
We are gathering information on what others have experienced and ideas.
Thank you.
Peter
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Follow Up By: Member - Heather L - Thursday, Nov 07, 2013 at 08:21

Thursday, Nov 07, 2013 at 08:21
Why don't you email WA Quarantine, explain how you dehydrate your own food and get them to give you a ruling on OK or not OK.
You will then have it in writing so stop any problems if stopped in WA.
Some outback roads have mobile checks - passed one on Great Central a few years ago - he set up in a different spot each day (and was enjoying the changing scenery!).
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Follow Up By: Member - PJR (NSW) - Thursday, Nov 07, 2013 at 08:46

Thursday, Nov 07, 2013 at 08:46
Hi Peter

Actually that may not be a bad idea. If you read that reference I gave you then you will see a reference to "processed" foods as being okay. I wouldn't mind knowing if they consider "dehydrated foods" as "processed". Interesting.

A month to plan for is an interesting project. We will be in a similar situation ourselves soon.

Phil
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