Sunday History Photo / WA

Submitted: Sunday, Dec 08, 2013 at 06:25
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Kalgoorlie, now known as Kalgoorlie-Boulder after Kalgoorlie and Boulder joined, is a city in the Goldfields-Esperance region of Western Australia, Australia, and is located 595 kilometres east-northeast of Perth at the end of the Great Eastern Highway. The town was founded in 1893 during the Yilgarn-Goldfields gold rush, and is located close to the so-called "Golden Mile".
In January 1893, prospectors Patrick (Paddy) Hannan, Tom Flanagan, and Dan O'Shea were travelling to Mount Youle when one of their horses cast a shoe. During the halt in their journey, the men noticed signs of gold in the area, and decided to stay put. On 17 June 1893, Hannan filed a Reward Claim, leading to hundreds of men swarming to the area in search of gold and Kalgoorlie, originally called Hannan's, was born.




In 1904, at the age of sixty-one, having prospected for all his adult life, Hannan was granted an annual pension of £150 by the Government of Western Australia. He ceased his prospecting activities in 1910, and moved to live with two nieces in Brunswick, Melbourne. He died there in 1925.
The main street and a suburb in Kalgoorlie both bear his name and in 1929 a statue of him by sculptor John MacLeod, was erected there. A popular Irish pub at the Burswood Entertainment Complex is also named after him.
The population of the town was 2,018 (1516 males and 502 females) in 1898.
The mining of gold, along with other metals such as nickel, has been a major industry in Kalgoorlie ever since, and today employs about one-quarter of Kalgoorlie's workforce and generates a significant proportion of its income. The concentrated area of large gold mines surrounding the original Hannan find is often referred to as the Golden Mile, and is considered by some to be the richest square mile of earth on the planet. The town's population was about 30,000 people in 1903 and began to grow into nearby Boulder.



The narrow gauge Government railway line reached Kalgoorlie in 1896, and the main named railway service from Perth was the overnight sleeper train The Westland which ran until the 1970s. In 1917, a standard gauge railway line was completed, connecting Kalgoorlie to the city of Port Augusta, South Australia across 2,000 kilometres of desert, and consequently the rest of the eastern states. The standardisation of the railway connecting Perth (which changed route from the narrow gauge route) in 1968 completed the Sydney-Perth railway, making it possible for rail travel from Perth to Sydney—and the Indian Pacific rail service commenced soon after. During the 1890s, the Goldfields area boomed as a whole, with an area population exceeding 200,000, mainly prospectors. The area gained a notorious reputation for being a wild west with bandits and prostitutes. This rapid increase in population and claims of neglect by the state government in Perth led to the proposition of the new state of Auralia but with the sudden diaspora after the Gold Rush these plans fell through.



Places, famous or infamous, that Kalgoorlie is noted for include its water pipeline, designed by C. Y. O'Connor and bringing in fresh water from Mundaring Weir near Perth, its Hay Street brothels, its two-up school, the goldfields railway loopline, the Kalgoorlie Town Hall, the Paddy Hannan statue/drinking fountain, the Super Pit and Mount Charlotte lookout. Its main street is Hannan Street, named after the town's founder. One of the infamous brothels also serves as a museum and is a major national attraction.
Kalgoorlie and the surrounding district was serviced by an extensive collection of suburban railways and tramways, providing for both passenger and freight traffic.
The Super Pit is an open-cut gold mine approximately 3.6 kilometres (2.2 mi) long, 1.6 kilometres (1.0 mi) wide and 512 metres (1,680 ft) deep. It was created by Alan Bond, who bought up a number of old mine leases in order to get the land area needed for the Super Pit. Every now and again the digging reveals an old shaft containing abandoned equipment and vehicles from the earlier mines.



The mine operates 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and a visitor centre overlooks it. The mine blasts at 1:00 pm every day, unless winds would carry dust over the town. Each of the massive trucks carries 225 tonnes of rock and the round trip takes about 35 minutes, most of that time being the slow uphill haul. Employees must live in Kalgoorlie; it is not a fly-in fly-out operation. The mine is expected to be productive until about 2017. At that point, it is planned to abandon it and allow the groundwater to seep in and fill it. It is estimated it will take about 50 years to fill completely.


Presented to you today from the Penrith Hospital, going home tomorrow.

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Reply By: Lyn W3 - Sunday, Dec 08, 2013 at 07:21

Sunday, Dec 08, 2013 at 07:21
Pleased to hear you're on the mend and will be back in Orange tomorrow.
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Reply By: Member - John - Sunday, Dec 08, 2013 at 07:46

Sunday, Dec 08, 2013 at 07:46
Bravo Zulu, well done from the hospital, thank you and hope you stay well. John
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Reply By: Member - batsy - Sunday, Dec 08, 2013 at 07:49

Sunday, Dec 08, 2013 at 07:49
Thanks for another great read Doug. The Goldfields area is so rich in history with an inexhaustible supply of stories & characters that one never tires of it. All the best with your recovery.
Cheers
Batsy
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Reply By: Member Bushy 04(VIC) - Sunday, Dec 08, 2013 at 08:33

Sunday, Dec 08, 2013 at 08:33
Good article again Doug.
Get well soon as we would be lost, without your Sunday history item, good to see that not even a opp can stop you.
All the best Bushy.
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Reply By: Member -Hilton Hillbillies - Sunday, Dec 08, 2013 at 10:36

Sunday, Dec 08, 2013 at 10:36
Thank you Doug,
I'm glad to hear you are on the mend and going home tomorrow.
Doug,
The Sunday History Photo gives joy to a lot of people and continuing to bring this to us, while in hospital recovering from surgery gives testament to the type of kind hearted person you are.
Thanks Mate


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Reply By: equinox - Sunday, Dec 08, 2013 at 11:00

Sunday, Dec 08, 2013 at 11:00
Hannan get's all the credit and statue, Flanagan get's nothing. Bit unfair really.


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Follow Up By: Phil B (WA) - Sunday, Dec 08, 2013 at 12:00

Sunday, Dec 08, 2013 at 12:00
Another great write up Doug.

Glad you're on the mend.



There is a lot of difference between
‘Human Being’ and ‘Being Human’.





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Follow Up By: Phil B (WA) - Sunday, Dec 08, 2013 at 12:03

Sunday, Dec 08, 2013 at 12:03
Oops posted the above in the wrong spot.

I agree with Alan
Hannan gets the credit - only because he was the smallest/lightest person of the three and therefore could ride the fastest to lodge the reward claim.

cheers

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Follow Up By: equinox - Sunday, Dec 08, 2013 at 12:24

Sunday, Dec 08, 2013 at 12:24
Gee, sorry about my punctuation there. It goes out the window when I speak in annoyance.

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Follow Up By: Life Member-Doug T NSW - Sunday, Dec 08, 2013 at 14:29

Sunday, Dec 08, 2013 at 14:29
I don't think either of them will worry much about it now..

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Reply By: Bob Y. - Qld - Monday, Dec 09, 2013 at 11:17

Monday, Dec 09, 2013 at 11:17
Doug,

Hope you haven't been giving those nurses a hard time :-)

Good to hear you will be out shortly. Good read, as always.

Regards,
Bob

Seen it all, Done it all.
Can't remember most of it.

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