Epirb

Submitted: Tuesday, Feb 17, 2004 at 12:53
ThreadID: 10589 Views:2006 Replies:8 FollowUps:12
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Yesterday, a car rolled over in the Gawler Rangers NW by W of Pt. Augusta. The area is remote with other travellers being few at this time of year. They were able to set off their epirb and two light planes were sent out to locate the vehicle. After they were located, the occupants were recovered by road. Not sure of the injuries but I do hope all were OK.
I don't have an epirb myself but this certainly gives some food for thought when travelling in isolated areas alone or in limited company. Even a sat phone could have broken its arial and been of no use in some cases.I'd rather have my bum on a beach in Broome
Than be stuck here in this damn room.
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Reply By: Vince NSW - Tuesday, Feb 17, 2004 at 13:13

Tuesday, Feb 17, 2004 at 13:13
Des,
I purchased one for the family to be used by whom ever is out and about and may have need of it. My family are into longrange bushwalking and end up in some remote places, its a cheap form of insurance ($228).
We also have it in with the emergency gear in the 4wd and when needed it can also be used on the boat.
Best thing since sliced bread
Cheers
Vince
AnswerID: 47039

Follow Up By: Member - Des Lexik(SA) - Tuesday, Feb 17, 2004 at 13:17

Tuesday, Feb 17, 2004 at 13:17
Your right there Vince.
Just make sure it can't be accidentally set off in the vehicle as a roving epirb costs lots of money to locate.I'd rather have my bum on a beach in Broome
Than be stuck here in this damn room.
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FollowupID: 309011

Follow Up By: Member - Eskimo - Tuesday, Feb 17, 2004 at 17:31

Tuesday, Feb 17, 2004 at 17:31
not just a roving one ....one that has been set off accidently costs heaps as well. Just have to kake sure they dont go off unless intended.
A portable also is also a good idea if going bushwalking into remote and or steep areas.Wow, am I cute! The extra long legs are built-in prevention against ducks disease. Great looks and a real goer. Doesnt waddle along like some.
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Follow Up By: Gajm - Tuesday, Feb 17, 2004 at 19:58

Tuesday, Feb 17, 2004 at 19:58
If anyone is intending to purchase one make sure you get one that hasn't been sitting in the shop for years and wont need the battery replaced any time soon, I got mine a couple of years ago from a small retail outlet and the battery is due to be replaced 2005..from what i recall they should last about 10 yrs, (correct me if im wrong),..at $95 to replace the battery id be a lot more observant when buying one in future

Glenn
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Follow Up By: KiwiAngler - Tuesday, Feb 17, 2004 at 21:57

Tuesday, Feb 17, 2004 at 21:57
Most EPIRB'S are difficult (not impossible) to set off 'accidentally. You have to break the seal, extend the antennae before they are activated, pretty hard to do both of those functions 'accidentally'.

The battery replacement recommendation is every 5 years, the recommended 'replace by date' is for safety tolerances at about 1/2 that of the nominal shelf life of the battery.
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FollowupID: 309085

Follow Up By: Gajm - Tuesday, Feb 17, 2004 at 22:13

Tuesday, Feb 17, 2004 at 22:13
Thanks Kiwi, i will replace mine ASAP, hate to find out the hard way the only battery life left was enough for the occasional test and nothing else
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Reply By: keith m - Tuesday, Feb 17, 2004 at 20:15

Tuesday, Feb 17, 2004 at 20:15
Came across 2 good tips about epirbs somewhere:

1. Keep it handy in the glove box or console with in easy reach of both driver and front seat pax....in a roll over you could be trapped and may need to get to the epirb to active it and throw it out the window. Don't keep it in a bag in the back of the truck!

1. Make sure the missus (or who normally sits in the front pax seat) knows what it is and how to use it in case the driver is out to it.
AnswerID: 47103

Follow Up By: Chris (W.A.) - Tuesday, Feb 17, 2004 at 20:41

Tuesday, Feb 17, 2004 at 20:41
Tip 3 Don't drive beyond your capabilitiesOne day a week, one weekend a month, six weeks a year.
Chris
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Reply By: Joe - Tuesday, Feb 17, 2004 at 21:02

Tuesday, Feb 17, 2004 at 21:02
Hi all,
I live in a fairly remote town in WA, last saturday I got a call from AusSar, they handle search & rescue etc. The satalite tracked a beacon about 48 km NW of town, they gave me a position to fly to and see what the problem was. The normal aircraft VHF radio is able to dial up the EPIRB distress frequency, flying to the position I was not able to hear the signal after searching the area breifly I called AusSar & notified them of no signal heard.They then asked me to check out a small mine operated by one person in the area. While flying to the mine I picked up the signal, a normal aircraft radio can't actually track a signal with certainty,but you can get an idea of direction.Any way I found two Austrian tourists, besides a flooded river, there rented 4WD about 50 meters down stream, just the roof showing. They managed to get some of their gear out as it was as it was being swept down stream, with the gear they saved was an EPIRB which they turned on at 9.30am, satalite picked up signal at around 11.00am. I flew them to a nearby cattle station where the police came out & picked them up. The actual point where the EPIRB was 14.5 km from first position. This highlights the importance of staying with your car to give the searches every chance to find you.

Joe
AnswerID: 47118

Follow Up By: Member - Eskimo - Tuesday, Feb 17, 2004 at 21:09

Tuesday, Feb 17, 2004 at 21:09
Good one Joe
glad you were able to locate them
just goes to show how important these things (epirbs) can be and as you say the importance of staying with the car
i say again ...good on ya JoeWow, am I cute! The extra long legs are built-in prevention against ducks disease. Great looks and a real goer. Doesnt waddle along like some.
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FollowupID: 309072

Follow Up By: Rojac - Tuesday, Feb 17, 2004 at 22:36

Tuesday, Feb 17, 2004 at 22:36
the one i have on the boat when activated can only pinpoint you within a 35Km radius.

has the technology improved to give a more precise location??
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Reply By: Member - Des Lexik(SA) - Tuesday, Feb 17, 2004 at 21:41

Tuesday, Feb 17, 2004 at 21:41
Update......... Saw on the news tonight that it was an older couple and they spent quite a few hours in very hot conditions with little shade. The real good news is that they are both ok.
The vehicle must have tripped over an emu!!!!I'd rather have my bum on a beach in Broome
Than be stuck here in this damn room.
AnswerID: 47127

Follow Up By: Joe - Tuesday, Feb 17, 2004 at 22:35

Tuesday, Feb 17, 2004 at 22:35
Giday Des,
Not real sure but I think the older couple were in SA. The Austrians were mid to late twentys.
A bit extra on the subject. They had crossed a couple of creeks just before and thought "she'll be right" the river was at least 2 meters deep and running fast.

Regards
Joe
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FollowupID: 309098

Reply By: Member - Rosco - Wednesday, Feb 18, 2004 at 07:13

Wednesday, Feb 18, 2004 at 07:13
A mate of mine recently went to a boat show and had a look at Epirbs. Apparently a new type is about to be released which operates on a different frequency??

Also they transmit a special identifying signal to let the authorities know who you are. Each unit is logged into a database with the owners details.

I think it went along those lines.

By the way I once heard that you had to pick up the tab if you set it off (in an emergency I mean). Doesn't sound correct.

Anyone know for sure??

CheersFidei defensor

Rosco
AnswerID: 47161

Follow Up By: StephenF - Wednesday, Feb 18, 2004 at 09:19

Wednesday, Feb 18, 2004 at 09:19
From the Caravanners Forum (original source not quoted)...

"The international council that controls the satellite system, Cospas-Sarsat, decided in October 2000 to cease processing 121.5 MHz analogue signals by satellite on 1 February 2009. From that date only 406 MHz beacons will be detected by satellite. The decision was made to reduce the chronically high false alarm rate from analogue distress beacons. Currently 97 percent of analogue distress beacon signals are false alarms."

Stephen.
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FollowupID: 309139

Follow Up By: Ian - Wednesday, Feb 18, 2004 at 17:14

Wednesday, Feb 18, 2004 at 17:14
Rosco.. friends of mine had to use one in the Vic High Country 6 months ago whilst on a horse riding trek . Suprised to learn that the satillites that pick up the signal don't pass over our region all that frequently but after a 3 - 4 hr wait they were winched out by helicopter & all ended up OK. No charge for genuine emergencies but they did have to provide ambulance membership details, not sure whether they picked up the tab. They now swear by them & without one would have spent a second night lost in rain & sleat with possible serious consequences..
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Reply By: WDR - Wednesday, Feb 18, 2004 at 19:27

Wednesday, Feb 18, 2004 at 19:27
It was even on the Sydney News - Lucky couple - I spent a great partg of my life in that area and this time of year you don't go wondering aound the property unless there is a reason. Great advertisement for safety and being prepared in the bush
AnswerID: 47246

Reply By: Michael - Saturday, Mar 06, 2004 at 21:08

Saturday, Mar 06, 2004 at 21:08
Hi all , I read something recently , something to the effect that after 2007, the eperb system will not operate, something of a dispute about who is going to pay for the running of this . I actually think it was in 4x4 australia, last year.. cheers Michael
AnswerID: 49410

Reply By: Blackie - Sunday, Mar 07, 2004 at 19:19

Sunday, Mar 07, 2004 at 19:19
There's alot of info here on epirbs etc follow a link and find out about the changes to take place in 2009

AnswerID: 49453

Follow Up By: Blackie - Sunday, Mar 07, 2004 at 19:21

Sunday, Mar 07, 2004 at 19:21
This will have to do
http://home.vicnet.net.au/~vicwalk/epirb/intro.html
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