4WD roadside tyre changing - best bottle jack?

Submitted: Thursday, Jan 23, 2014 at 14:44
ThreadID: 105920 Views:28296 Replies:12 FollowUps:15
This Thread has been Archived
I had a blowout on one of the back tyres last Friday, & again my OE bottle jack (and the aftermarket 6tonne one I also carry) struggled to make the jacking distance (Prado 120 with 50mm lift & slightly larger 265/70/17 tyres). ie
- OE Toyota jack is 1.8tonne & 195-485 lift range = 280mm lift + initial screw adjust
- Superworks is 6tonne & 205-410 lift range = 205 lift & no screw adjust.

If i have to initially use the chassis to lift, then the aftermarket one just doesn't have the range to lift a flat tyre off the ground to an inflated tyre height. I do carry a jacking plate & bits of 12 ply to get the jack as close to the jacking point as possible. Between the two jacks and the various bits of wood i do finally get one of the jacks to the right height .. just. So I've hunted around for a better bottle jack solution & see that lots of other folks also have this problem & I reckon there NO bottle jacks on the market with a good lifting height AND that also have a lowish minimum height to be able to initially slip under the jacking point and get started. I was very close to buying one of the SPX bottle jacks (9006x = 6t, 216mm-521mm or the 9011x = 11t, 200-530 + 68mm screw adjust .. but the 9011x is a big beast) until i saw on one of the Disco websites that they suggest using a Mercedes Sprinter Van OE bottle jack (2.6t, 260-570mm, no screw adjust) which gives an impressive 310mm lift You still need your OE jack because you may need its minimum height to initially get the chassis/axle high enough to use the Sprinter jack.

So today I bought a 2nd hand one ($170 delivered from First Auto Parts in Seaford Vic)) & it will now replace the Superworks one i am carrying (ie still keeping the Toyota OE one as well). If there is the 'perfect' bottle jack out there that i've missed .. please let us know (i would prefer to only carry one)
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Member - Tony (ACT) - Thursday, Jan 23, 2014 at 14:58

Thursday, Jan 23, 2014 at 14:58
I have two bottle jacks, one a worm drive the other hydraulic. Mostly get away with one under the shock hanger. If its to low I put one jack under the diff till I can get enough height, the other one under the shock.

By then there is enough to get the flat off and the spare on.
AnswerID: 524986

Reply By: Member - Oldbaz. NSW. - Thursday, Jan 23, 2014 at 15:00

Thursday, Jan 23, 2014 at 15:00
G'day Drew, you may well have cured your problem. My solution is a 2ton Trolley Jack..
replaces them all. Used on car & van without need to crawl under. I don't know the
max & min height figures, but it goes in low & up high. Maybe loses a bit in weight
against bottle jacks, maybe not, but wins on stability. I do carry a small bottle one as
back up. cheers....oldbaz.
AnswerID: 524987

Follow Up By: DrewT - Thursday, Jan 23, 2014 at 17:27

Thursday, Jan 23, 2014 at 17:27
yep i didn't even consider the trolley jacks purely because of the size that they take up!
0
FollowupID: 806852

Follow Up By: Penchy - Friday, Jan 24, 2014 at 08:24

Friday, Jan 24, 2014 at 08:24
I have a trolley jack also. Yes it is a fair bit larger but its fits a nice whole behind my rear seat. So much easier than a bottle jack (I keep one of these as a spare also).
0
FollowupID: 806898

Reply By: pop2jocem - Thursday, Jan 23, 2014 at 15:22

Thursday, Jan 23, 2014 at 15:22
Drew,

I think the problem you, me and probably many others have is that for the jack (2 stage) to be low enough to get under the axle or spring mounts and then lift high enough to get the now inflated spare on is that the length of travel is governed by the length of the the jack when not extended. Obviously the rams cannot be longer than the jack body so the most lift you can get is a bit less than twice the height of the non extended length. What I have found was that using a jack and axle support stand while not saving any space certainly saved a fair bit of weight.
Personally I use my Hi lift jack, which I carry anyway, and an adaptor that slides onto the hubs of my Landcruiser. This gives me way more lift than I could ever need, and then lower the vehicle onto the axle stand. Now much safer than working under a vehicle supported by any jack. I then remove the flat tyre and replace it with the spare. Lift the vehicle off the axle stand with the Hi lift and lower it to the ground. Final tighten of wheel nuts and all good to go.
This works a treat on a vehicle that has a fully floating design and so a hub to take the adaptor but not sure if that would work with other semi floating styles. Maybe a different type of adaptor.
Obviously if you don't travel with a Hi lift jack, many don't, all this means jack bleep ...LOL.
Sorry (;=((

Cheers
Pop
AnswerID: 524989

Reply By: Member - wicket - Thursday, Jan 23, 2014 at 16:26

Thursday, Jan 23, 2014 at 16:26
While on the subject of jacks you might find these Safe Jack accessories of interest

Safe Jack
AnswerID: 524993

Follow Up By: Member - Boobook - Thursday, Jan 23, 2014 at 19:20

Thursday, Jan 23, 2014 at 19:20
Nice find Wicket.
0
FollowupID: 806865

Reply By: Member - Michael P (QLD) - Thursday, Jan 23, 2014 at 17:21

Thursday, Jan 23, 2014 at 17:21
Drew Hi,
My answer is to carry a scissor lift jack as a second, from Super Cheap. Cost about $50.00 have seen 12v electric ones on E-bay that look pretty good at about $90.00.
Pretty hard to get away with one jack on a high clearance vehicle.
Regards Mike.
AnswerID: 524996

Reply By: Echucan Bob - Thursday, Jan 23, 2014 at 18:00

Thursday, Jan 23, 2014 at 18:00
As with all 4WD equipment, what you take is a compromise between the weight and size of the piece of kit, the ease of use, and the likelihood of it being needed. Think winch, think 200 L fuel tank, think jack, even bull bar.
Go down to your local weigh bridge and put a full steel bar, a high lift or trolley jack, and a 950 lb winch on the scales - thats a lot of freight to be lugging around that may not be needed (and that's before you add on 80 kg or so for the oversized fuel load)!
If a single piece of kit can be shared between several vehicles then it might make a bit more sense. A high lift jack between four cars and it almost justifies inclusion.
When it comes to jacks I've had (and still have) a hi lift, an inflatable exhaust gas bag, the oem worm drive, and a 4 tonne hydraulic.
The 4 tonne hydraulic with the coaxial piston is the go.

PS What sort of tyre blew Drew? Might a TPMS have saved it?

Bob
AnswerID: 525001

Follow Up By: pop2jocem - Thursday, Jan 23, 2014 at 18:09

Thursday, Jan 23, 2014 at 18:09
Don't forget the fire extinguisher and the first aid kit. All extra weight and space. After all someone else will have one or someone will come along who has.

Wow!! 950 lb. That's some winch you have there Bob.
.

Cheers
Pop
0
FollowupID: 806856

Follow Up By: DrewT - Thursday, Jan 23, 2014 at 19:18

Thursday, Jan 23, 2014 at 19:18
Hi Bob. It was a very old cooper A/T that delaminated. The TPMS did indicate that another tyre was a bit low about 5 min beforehand. I pulled over and looked at all 4 tyres and felt if they were too hot (it was one of those heatwave days), but everything was ok. So i suspect that there was no indication that it was about to delaminate (not that i was looking for that)
0
FollowupID: 806864

Follow Up By: Echucan Bob - Thursday, Jan 23, 2014 at 23:44

Thursday, Jan 23, 2014 at 23:44
Pop,
I think I meant 9500 lb - damn yanks and their pounds shillings and pence!

Bob
0
FollowupID: 806892

Reply By: aussiedingo (River Rina) - Thursday, Jan 23, 2014 at 18:51

Thursday, Jan 23, 2014 at 18:51
G'day all 'n drew
I have used & carried for 30years+ a 1978 ish Fairlane factory supplied boot jack, very light as well & I think those Fairlanes were about 2 tonnes, one for disconnecting @ tilting my big boat, the other for everything else! mine is still in the black carpet bag they originally came in! very easy to adapt to van, trailer or 4wd. would be cheap from any wrecker, hoo roo
"the only thing constant in my life is change"




Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 525003

Reply By: Member - Bruce C (NSW) - Thursday, Jan 23, 2014 at 21:05

Thursday, Jan 23, 2014 at 21:05
Hi Drew,
I have recently bought one of those 12 volt operated scissor jacks from Ebay which works very well and as it has a remote I can stand or kneel beside the vehicle rather than crouch on my elbows and knees to wind the jack up. I am impressed with this new Jack.

I removed the plug on the end of the lead and replaced it with an anderson plug so that I can plug it into the anderson on the back of the car as well as use it on the van where I have an anderson plug fitted to each side for that purpose.

I also have several blocks of wood to place under the jack. I used to have hardwood but have now converted to several pieces of treated pine 150 X 150 X 50 as it is lighter than hardwood.

By this method I can have a 50mm lift under the jack or a 100mm lift if needed and they are cheap as well. I can also use them to level the van if needed when setting up on a site.

Cheers, Bruce.
At home and at ease on a track that I know not and
restless and lost on a track that I know. HL.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  Send Message

AnswerID: 525011

Reply By: Member - PJR (NSW) - Friday, Jan 24, 2014 at 07:42

Friday, Jan 24, 2014 at 07:42
We carry a of caravan levellers like these to level the car when sleeping in the roof top tent. You could roll the flat up onto it to give you extra room under the axle to get the jack under the axle or shock absorber mount etc. No weight (their plastic) and helpful for more than just changing a flat. But I would never use them to put the jack on!!!

I don't like that idea of jacking up from the body myself and have luckily never had to do it. I just don't like the instability. Would prefer some other way than a high lift jack also.

Phil

AnswerID: 525027

Follow Up By: Dave B ( ADL) - Friday, Jan 24, 2014 at 08:24

Friday, Jan 24, 2014 at 08:24
I have used the same principle as Phil, but used blocks of wood.
Just drive the flat tyre up onto a couple of blocks of wood and you have lifted the car up high enough to give a good jack enough room to get your tyre off the ground.
Just double check you have enough clearance to put a fully inflated tyre back on the axle again before you take the old tyre off.

cheers
Dave
'Wouldn't be dead for quids'

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 806899

Follow Up By: Member - David M (SA) - Friday, Jan 24, 2014 at 09:38

Friday, Jan 24, 2014 at 09:38
Like the idea of the van leveller Phil. To change the front tyre on the 100 Series the only way I know to get the supplied jack under the IFS is to use blocks or a mound of dirt. Been thinking about carrying a trolley jack.
Cheers,Dave.
0
FollowupID: 806906

Follow Up By: Member - PJR (NSW) - Friday, Jan 24, 2014 at 10:02

Friday, Jan 24, 2014 at 10:02
The only space left is in the glovebox and center console. I don't think that a trolley jack would fit in them.

Phil
0
FollowupID: 806911

Follow Up By: Member - David M (SA) - Friday, Jan 24, 2014 at 22:40

Friday, Jan 24, 2014 at 22:40
Think I recognize a couple of those sandbags. :)
Cheers,Dave.
0
FollowupID: 806938

Follow Up By: Member - PJR (NSW) - Saturday, Jan 25, 2014 at 07:29

Saturday, Jan 25, 2014 at 07:29
I may be a bit slow sometimes Dave. But "sandbags"????

Phil
0
FollowupID: 806945

Follow Up By: Member - David M (SA) - Saturday, Jan 25, 2014 at 08:27

Saturday, Jan 25, 2014 at 08:27
Try the green ones in your other profile photo.
Dave.
1
FollowupID: 806947

Reply By: Robin Miller - Friday, Jan 24, 2014 at 10:39

Friday, Jan 24, 2014 at 10:39
Hi Drew

I think you already have the perfect one - which car does it come with , I might try and source one ?

Its some years since I did similar research and came up with standard Nissan Y61 as best jack, it sounds similar to yours but only goes from 190 - 410 mm.
Nothing hydraulic would match it.

Can you confirm yours is 280mm lift plus additional screw bit - or did you mean 280mm total.
The Nissan is also 1.8t and weights in at a light 3.8kg

I also carry 19mm marine ply base plate and a few bits of treated pine 100X100 and 100 X 50 to reach a max of 600mm.
Robin Miller

Member
My Profile  Send Message

AnswerID: 525046

Follow Up By: DrewT - Saturday, Jan 25, 2014 at 09:44

Saturday, Jan 25, 2014 at 09:44
Hi Robin. Per my original post the OE one is from my Prado 120. Yes it has 280mm lift and initial screw adjust. It's wind up not hydraulic
0
FollowupID: 806952

Reply By: get outmore - Friday, Jan 24, 2014 at 11:41

Friday, Jan 24, 2014 at 11:41
are you using the jack correctly?

reason i ask Ive had so many people tell me a factory jack doesnt go high enough or low enough etc to jack up a 70 series ute

and yet ive never had an issue and that with no jacking plate or board which would make the job easier again

its all a matter of grabbing the handbook and seeing where to jack from which is why 90% of people have the issue with jacks and the other 10% is due to extremely modified jacks so the factory jack doesnt work
AnswerID: 525053

Follow Up By: get outmore - Friday, Jan 24, 2014 at 11:49

Friday, Jan 24, 2014 at 11:49
sorry that should be modified suspension but even that makes no difference as it doesnt raise the hight of your axle. Larger tyres will but even then the standard jack at least on a tojo 70 series has extra travel so it would take a larger tyre

someone said the highest a jack can go is a little under twice the hight which is totally wrong - from emory the jack in my troopy has at least 3 stages and gous up much higher than twice the hight of the jack.

jacking from under the axle the factory jack easily copes but would be alot easier with a block of wood under as even with a fully flat tyre theres a fair bit of travel for the jack to meet the axle
0
FollowupID: 806915

Follow Up By: pop2jocem - Friday, Jan 24, 2014 at 19:16

Friday, Jan 24, 2014 at 19:16
"someone said the highest a jack can go is a little under twice the hight (sic) which is totally wrong"

If you had read and understood what the "someone" had written you just might have noticed that the reference was to a 2 stage jack.
Obviously a 3, 4 or whatever stage jack which is just a version of a hydraulic cylinder in the case of hydraulic jacks will go much higher depending on the number of stages. Ever observed a semi tipper emptying it's load? If you have you may have seen a collapsed cylinder of maybe 2 meters in length extend to well over 6 meters. The reason in case you missed it is that each successive ram rod is contained within the one before.
The OP seemed to be interested in that type.

Cheers
Pop
0
FollowupID: 806931

Reply By: Member - Paul B (WA) - Sunday, Jan 26, 2014 at 10:23

Sunday, Jan 26, 2014 at 10:23
I have been looking for years, in auto/4WD shops and wreckers yards etc for a jack I thought was quite common in the 60's when I was a kid, that was either a two stage hydraulic jack or a three stage screw jack.

The hydraulic jack had a narrower diameter piston inside the bottom one that simply telescoped out to increase the jacking height, but I haven't seen one for years so I'm beginning to wonder if I'm simply mistaken. Or confused. It wouldn't be the first time!

Likewise the old Holden jacks were very compact but jacked about three times their height with 3 stage screws, but I doubt they'd be high enough for these purposes.
Paul B Kalgoorlie

Do your best, have fun & s/he with the most friends wins!

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 525147

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)