Off road rims

Submitted: Monday, Feb 24, 2014 at 21:09
ThreadID: 106413 Views:4302 Replies:6 FollowUps:8
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Hi everyone , just wanted to know if anyone had preferences for good off road rims as I have been looking around and there are heaps of different shapes ect.
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Reply By: Member - Rosco from way back - Monday, Feb 24, 2014 at 21:42

Monday, Feb 24, 2014 at 21:42
G'day Ian

Dynamic are a good solid steel rim. Not sure if they're made in Oz, but think so.
Personally I wouldn't go for aftermarket alloy rims (too many stories of them breaking).
A lot of punters don't like OEM alloys but I've not had a problem with either LR or Mr T's.
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Follow Up By: 08crd - Tuesday, Feb 25, 2014 at 00:25

Tuesday, Feb 25, 2014 at 00:25
I've got dynamic steels on the jeep. The mags are in the shed.

There is nothing worse than having to change a tire in the middle of nowhere, on mag wheels, the damage is horrific.lol
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Follow Up By: The Bantam - Tuesday, Feb 25, 2014 at 20:01

Tuesday, Feb 25, 2014 at 20:01
Another vote for the "dyna mic" wheels....If you have a set you will understand the joke.

I have a set of 6....a lot of the competitive guys use them and they seem to be stronger than many of the other steel spoke wheels on the market....AND they come black, white or silver.....I don't think anybody else does silver off the shelf.

worth the extra $20 or $30 per wheel.


Now a mate of mine baught some generic steel spoke wheels.......he went thru 7 to get 4 straight ones.....this is fresh stock.

cheers
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Reply By: Member - Scrubby (VIC) - Monday, Feb 24, 2014 at 21:44

Monday, Feb 24, 2014 at 21:44
G`day Ian,
I suggest "ROH Track 2" steel wheels.
I initially had mag wheels but changed to steel because of the ability to hammer any (most) dents from rock damage out,(often while the tyre is still inflated on the rim).
The rock damage to a Mag Wheel is usually a wheel broken into several pieces.
A Steel Wheel is weldable if really necessary.
Less occurrence of the wheel nuts working loose on a Steel Wheel.
Also a large price difference.

Talking from experience.

Scrubby.
I don`t know where i`m going but i`m enjoying the journey.

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Follow Up By: Member - Rosco from way back - Monday, Feb 24, 2014 at 22:02

Monday, Feb 24, 2014 at 22:02
Interesting about the nuts loosening Scrub

Last time we were at the Top we were speaking with the bloke with the wrecking yard who handles all the recoveries etc + RACQ.

He was saying the same about alloys (reckoned Nissan were the worst).

At the time we were in a Defender with alloys.
Regularly checked but could never budge the alloys, yet could invariable get 1/8 of a turn with the steel rims on the CT.
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Follow Up By: Mick O - Monday, Feb 24, 2014 at 22:03

Monday, Feb 24, 2014 at 22:03
A second for ROH. I'd avoid "Speedie" steel rims. Very poor quality control.

Check you load ratings on the rims as well. Most steelies sit around 1200kgs but some are 1400kgs which is a better option.

Here's a review I did on the "Speedie" rims;

Toyos and Speedie rims

Cheers

Mick
''We knew from the experience of well-known travelers that the
trip would doubtless be attended with much hardship.''
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Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Monday, Feb 24, 2014 at 22:46

Monday, Feb 24, 2014 at 22:46
Gday Mick,
How sure are you that they were "Speedie" rims? Any chance you were sold some duds?
The speedie rims I had on my 79series looked different to yours - mine had good taper, no blue stickers, and different colour stripes around the rim. And they were clearly stamped "Taiwan" on the back. They did about 100,000k without a problem including the usual corrugated desert roads. Eventually I swapped them for some factory alloys I found locally, but they did the job.
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Follow Up By: Kanga1 - Monday, Feb 24, 2014 at 22:57

Monday, Feb 24, 2014 at 22:57
ROH Track 2 are allowable on mine sites because of their steel thickness and build quality some "named" and"no name" brands are questionable. The ROH are a bit harder to get a tyre off than say a Speedy because of the depth of the well. but 3mm construction against 2mm is a no-brainer for me.. Kanga..
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Follow Up By: Mick O - Tuesday, Feb 25, 2014 at 11:33

Tuesday, Feb 25, 2014 at 11:33
Phil, definitely speedy rims as later conversations with the company around product quality reinforced.

Whether this was a batch of sub quality products imported from a nearby manufacturing giant I am unable to say. The company would not verify source location.

I have not looked at their products since so cannot confirm current quality. How old were your rims Phil? If they were sourced pre 2010, they may have been of better quality than these. We all know what the pressure fo the dollar and high manufacturing costs in Australia can lead to outsourcing of much cheaper (and sometimes inferior) products from O/S.

Regards

Mick
''We knew from the experience of well-known travelers that the
trip would doubtless be attended with much hardship.''
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Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Tuesday, Feb 25, 2014 at 18:17

Tuesday, Feb 25, 2014 at 18:17
Gday Mick,
Mine were 2003 vintage. I also had a second set of ROH. They were similar thickness (about 5mm) and weight - around 12 kgs. But nowhere near as strong as the factory Toyota 105series steels which were 6mm thick and weighed 17kgs each.

There was a kuffuffle in 2008 when a bunch of mining rims (and others) cracked like yours. Originally blamed on Speedy who defended themselves by pointing out that the broken ones that were photographed were not their's (different colour striping). I don't know how that all ended, but theres an old thread that gives the story:
Thread 63828.

I get that feeling that your 2010 rims came out of the same factory as those other failures!!
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Reply By: Isuzumu - Tuesday, Feb 25, 2014 at 10:08

Tuesday, Feb 25, 2014 at 10:08
Power of Volk Racing by Rays Engineering (Japan)
This is what is stamped on the wheels
"Super Fine Original Forging Technology"
Forged Alloy the strongest wheel around. This technology is now used on F1 and V8 Supercars as they are unbreakable.
Where to get them, a few grey imports such as our Isuzu MU came with them on, check e.bay. New price around a grand each.
Cheers Bruce
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Reply By: Ozrover - Tuesday, Feb 25, 2014 at 10:41

Tuesday, Feb 25, 2014 at 10:41
Ian,

I don't know what car your driving but I replaced the alloys on my 78 series Dual Cab with Toyota 105 series GXL steel rims, heaps thicker than aftermarket steelies.

We've had problems with the wheel nuts coming loose on the 79 series alloys & have bent numerous Track 2 steelies, some repairable some not, we've also had problems with the bead sealing on some Track 2 Black Trax rims, I had to remove the paint to get them to seal, It may have something to do with the black paint as it hasn't been a problem on the white rims.

Just a thought.

AnswerID: 527190

Reply By: Member - Brenton H (SA) - Tuesday, Feb 25, 2014 at 11:42

Tuesday, Feb 25, 2014 at 11:42
Just a general comment on steel rims.
If you are already heavily loaded and headed for sandy territory where weight counts or if you are over or close to GVM then the 6+ steel rims can add in excess of 30Kg over the same size alloys.
Just something to consider if your already looking at all the junk you carry camping and thinking some things have to go to lighten the load.
AnswerID: 527193

Reply By: The Bantam - Tuesday, Feb 25, 2014 at 20:21

Tuesday, Feb 25, 2014 at 20:21
I know in general, there is the perception that steel wheels are stronger and more durable than alloys.

And yes I did sell the set of 4 alloys that came on my vehicle for more than it cost me to buy 6 new quaity steel wheels.

But there have been some tests and the genearal asertion is not reliable.

Some of the alloy wheels out there are very strong and stand up better than a good steel wheel.

But wheels aint wheels, Sol.

There are some very cheap nasty steel wheels that wont stay straight long, and when bent won't hammer back into shape well at all.

The better alloys will resist bending and breakage way better than any steel wheel......but you will be paying...and you will have to do your homework to know what to buy.


a couple of very real advantages to alloy wheels is the weight...let me tell you steel wheels with 15 or 16 inch tyres on are way lighter than equavalent steel.

If you are man handling wheels, alloy is a hell of a lot lighter.

And Yes...if you are running up against a bit of a weight problem, changing to alloy may just save your bacon.......forget 20 or 30 KG...think more in terms of 50Kg weight saving over 6 wheels....that is about the weight of a skinny girlfriend...or two slabs of beer....or two jerries of fuel.


Then there is corrosion.
My brother is a die hard steel wheel man...splitties if he can get em....but he runs alloys on his boat trailer...the alloys are easier to manage in corrosinve situations.

cheers
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