Redarc Smartstart

Submitted: Sunday, Mar 16, 2014 at 13:33
ThreadID: 106744 Views:1790 Replies:3 FollowUps:9
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G'day guy's, I have just recently bought a redarc smartstart and a battery tray kit. I plan to use a century battery I had laying around. Its 720cca and has an rc rating of 160.

Before I start this arvo, I was wondering if there is anything I need to know that may not be covered in the instructions?

Josh
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Reply By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Sunday, Mar 16, 2014 at 13:49

Sunday, Mar 16, 2014 at 13:49
You should be right Josh. The Redarc instructions are very clear.

Pay particular attention to the specified cable sizes and the fuse or circuit breaker requirements.
The cable sizes are important for adequate current carrying capacity and to minimise voltage-drop losses.
The fuses/circuit breakers are required at each battery to protect against fire in the event of a short circuit.

If you run into any problems just ask on here.
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Member - ironJosh - Sunday, Mar 16, 2014 at 19:35

Sunday, Mar 16, 2014 at 19:35
I can not believe how easily this unit went into the 80 series. For the battery tray I just needed some m8 bolts I got from bunnings. Came home, fitted the battery tray & battery, went inside and connected the wires to the terminals, mounted the unit using the m8 bolts I bought for the battery tray into some random holes on the inner guard near the air filter box, and hay presto!

The only thing I will have to do is lengthen the lead going from the cranking battery as it didn't follow the firewall the whole way, I just need some terminals and I can cut some excess off the other side near the aux battery.
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Reply By: Sand Man (SA) - Sunday, Mar 16, 2014 at 19:34

Sunday, Mar 16, 2014 at 19:34
Josh,

What is the auxiliary battery to be used for?
If you intend running constant current draw items such as a compressor fridge, the battery may not be the best choice, just because you had it lying around.

A deep cycle battery, designed for a prolonged current draw is the best choice for an auxiliary battery.

Batteries rated in cca (Cold Cranking Amps) are designed for high current for a very short time, as in starting a vehicle.
Batteries rated in Ah (Amp Hours) are designed for a constant current draw over a prolonged period.

So, it depends on what the second battery is to be used for, on whether your investment in a dual battery system is sound or not.
Bill


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Follow Up By: Member - ironJosh - Sunday, Mar 16, 2014 at 19:52

Sunday, Mar 16, 2014 at 19:52
Hi Sandman, I will be using an engel fridge and some campsite lights off the aux battery.

I was looking at getting an optima deep cycle battery, rated at 750 cca and 120rc. I looked up my century which is 720 and 160rc, which is about 76 amp hours. Better than the optima "deep cycle" battery.

I can purchase a century deep cycle with 100ah, but already had one with 76... so I'm happy with that (for the time being)

Josh
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Follow Up By: Charlie B2 - Monday, Mar 17, 2014 at 13:10

Monday, Mar 17, 2014 at 13:10
Hi Josh,

With Optimas, you really need to watch clearance from the terminals to the underside of the bonnet with any Aux battery set-up.

On my 100 Series 'Cruiser, there's nowhere near enough clearance! If the fitter had closed the bonnet with an Optima in the cradle, the two threaded terminals would have made "terminal" (pun intended) contact with the steel bonnet and, if I were a betting man, I'd have laid odds the vehicle would have been a smoking ruin!

By the way, not a good idea to test-fit by trying this! :-)

Regards,


Charlie
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Monday, Mar 17, 2014 at 14:22

Monday, Mar 17, 2014 at 14:22
Very good point Charlie.

I needed to lower the carrier in order to get adequate clearance from the +ve terminal. It was alarmingly close before, 3 or 4mm!!

One way to check for existing clearance is to create a "little mountain" of Blu-Tack or similar putty on the terminal post and close the bonnet. When opened, the compacted height of the Blu-Tack will indicate the clearance.
Cheers
Allan

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Reply By: Member - ironJosh - Sunday, Mar 16, 2014 at 19:57

Sunday, Mar 16, 2014 at 19:57
I guess the only question I have now is....

When the cruiser is now turned off, will the isolator only draw current from the aux battery? So for example if I run my sound system really loud until the aux battery runs out, I can still hop in and turn the engine? (not that I'm going to do this).

Does this mean I cant run the main battery dry from the headlights? If so: why don't all cars have this?

AnswerID: 528505

Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Sunday, Mar 16, 2014 at 21:16

Sunday, Mar 16, 2014 at 21:16
Josh, If your sound system is connected to your new auxiliary battery then it cannot exhaust your main (cranking) battery.
If however, the sound system is connected to the main battery it can exhaust it and so fail to crank the engine. Your choice.

You certainly can "run the main battery dry from the headlights." The auxiliary battery will not feed "backwards" to supply the headlights.
If you run your sound system "until the aux battery runs out" you will permanently damage the battery. It should not be discharged below about 50%.

Also your choice is running your sound system "really loud" and exhausting your hearing...... also known as incurring a permanent hearing loss. You can recharge batteries but not your hearing!

Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Member - ironJosh - Sunday, Mar 16, 2014 at 22:06

Sunday, Mar 16, 2014 at 22:06
Haha thanks Allen,

So from here I suppose I should get an auto electrician to run some wires to the back of the car and install some 12v connectors? Or is this something I can under-take myself?

Can I run a thick wire straight from the battery down the back and have a terminal system & possibly an inverter back there?

Josh
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Follow Up By: get outmore - Monday, Mar 17, 2014 at 00:34

Monday, Mar 17, 2014 at 00:34
Its an easy peasy job in an 80
Run wires off your aux battery and theres a grommet in the firewall. Then under the trim at where the base of your doors are is channeling to run the wires to the back
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Monday, Mar 17, 2014 at 00:46

Monday, Mar 17, 2014 at 00:46
You could do it yourself if you feel comfortable about it Josh. Alternatively an auto electrician would do it for a price.

There is a wiring diagram in the Redarc instructions which you should have or this is a link to them. I would recommend you use 13mm2 (6B&S) cable. The only change that I would suggest to the Redarc instructions is to not rely on the vehicle body as the negative return but to run a separate wire of the same gauge as the positive back to the cranking battery earth point.

Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: WBS - Monday, Mar 17, 2014 at 08:17

Monday, Mar 17, 2014 at 08:17
Apart from also installing a Redarc Smart start isolator, what I did was install an 8 fuse fuse box under the bonnet and ran all my wires from there. I also ran a negative wire from the battery and did not rely on the earth from the body of the vehicle. From the fuse box I ran wires to where I wanted power outlets and used appropriate fuses and wire gauges based on what I would use that power socket for. For example I ran heavy duty wires to the fridge power sockets and a heavier fuses in the fuse box for them. I had 8 power sockets running off the auxiliary battery. It worked really well and I had plenty of sockets for stuff. I also ran a very heavy duty wire ( + & -) from the Auxiliary battery to the back of the vehicle to an Anderson plug.

My system ran successfully for many years before I sold the 80 series.
WBS
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