Comment: UHF Radio

Being a first time user of CB radios what is the radio etiquette to, join in to a conversation, ask for a radio check, acknowledge a call etc. ?
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Reply By: allein m - Wednesday, Mar 19, 2014 at 11:47

Wednesday, Mar 19, 2014 at 11:47
From what I can gather there is no basic rules set out but for my self I use common sense and basic manners on the radio

If you want a radio check just ask for one , when I finish I always say over but many do not.
AnswerID: 528664

Follow Up By: Ross M - Wednesday, Mar 19, 2014 at 16:49

Wednesday, Mar 19, 2014 at 16:49
Over is when you are not "finished" and it is for when you are OVER to the other person for them to talk back/reply.

Out is for when the conversation has finished and there will be no more replies / transmitting from you.

OVER = not finished,

OUT = You have finished.

That allows others who want to talk when you "have" finished to do so.
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FollowupID: 811289

Reply By: Member - evaredy - Wednesday, Mar 19, 2014 at 12:13

Wednesday, Mar 19, 2014 at 12:13
thanks for posting this, I am new to UHF as well and have always wondered what one is supposed to do.

This may sound stupid but, I am wondering how you identify a vehicle you want to talk to.
Say I am driving along and a truck is waiting to pass or I come up behind a truck and am wanting to know when it's safe to pass.


AnswerID: 528666

Follow Up By: Member - Rosco from way back - Wednesday, Mar 19, 2014 at 12:23

Wednesday, Mar 19, 2014 at 12:23
If there are no other trucks in the vicinity I usually find addressing them as "Big Fella" usually has the desired result.

As in .... "You on the air there Big Fella?"
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FollowupID: 811266

Follow Up By: crash53 - Wednesday, Mar 19, 2014 at 12:48

Wednesday, Mar 19, 2014 at 12:48
Evaredy,
I'm with you I don't know what to say to be in the lingo and not sound dumb.
I was always told there is no such thing as a stupid question, only stupid people for not asking them.

Rosco,
When you are all alone on the road, and the radio is quiet, what do you say to find anyone out there??
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FollowupID: 811268

Follow Up By: get outmore - Wednesday, Mar 19, 2014 at 12:50

Wednesday, Mar 19, 2014 at 12:50
rarely use the radio on the road but give them as much info as you can - if you can see a name use it and direction
perhaps
"Copynexus northbound and perhaps a quck flick of the lights so he is sure its you
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FollowupID: 811269

Follow Up By: Member - Rosco from way back - Wednesday, Mar 19, 2014 at 12:59

Wednesday, Mar 19, 2014 at 12:59
Crash

If there's no one else about I don't usually bother. I only tend to use the radio when necessary.

And with all due respect to "Getoutmore's" tongue in cheek suggestions below ........ I avoid Americanisms like the plague as I personally consider them loathsome in the extreme ... ;o)
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FollowupID: 811271

Follow Up By: Bazooka - Thursday, Mar 20, 2014 at 00:27

Thursday, Mar 20, 2014 at 00:27
PLEASE don't get into the habit of either giving or blindly accepting advice on overtaking safety Eva. Leave it to statements such as "White Prado here, looking to overtake when safe to do so", or "copy that" (in response to someone else letting you know they're coming). Don't rely on anyone else's advice on whether it's safe to overtake. Read THIS THREAD ABOUT BLINKERS AND PASSING, particularly Hairy's response about halfway down (FollowupID: 808938 Submitted: Monday, Feb 17, 2014 at 16:05).

A little on etiquette on UHF talk - there isn't much, as others have said, but here's a few to kick you off.

Radio check: as simple as 'can someone give me a radio check please.'

If you just want to talk to anyone on channel: 'anyone got a copy/on air' does the job.

To break in on a conversation: 'breaker' then wait for a response such as 'go ahead breaker' used to be used a lot but I haven't heard it in quite a while.

To acknowledge that you've heard a message: 'copy that' or 'thanks, understood' - whatever you're comfortable with.

To talk to a truckie/caravan: what Rosco said or something like - 'southbound semi/caravan got a copy?'

'Over' and 'out' are rarely used on CB (UHF) channels in my experience but convoys often decide their own protocols .

Common sense and a little courtesy is all that's necessary.
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FollowupID: 811327

Reply By: get outmore - Wednesday, Mar 19, 2014 at 12:47

Wednesday, Mar 19, 2014 at 12:47
if theres 2 or more of you etiquite is you call in your convoy

"breaker breaker this heres the rubber duck weve got ourselves a convoy 10-4 and watch out for smokeys "

this should give you the right idea

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EnJEeHND_lQ
AnswerID: 528667

Follow Up By: crash53 - Wednesday, Mar 19, 2014 at 12:54

Wednesday, Mar 19, 2014 at 12:54
I just thought that when I called over the radio I would rather sound like an Australian than Bert Reynolds, out of "Smokey and the Bandit" movie?
But I still thank you for your reply
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Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Wednesday, Mar 19, 2014 at 21:55

Wednesday, Mar 19, 2014 at 21:55
GOM's taking the piss out of you , Crash.

Just talk in normal voice, as you would if talking face to face.

Bob

Seen it all, Done it all.
Can't remember most of it.

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Follow Up By: get outmore - Wednesday, Mar 19, 2014 at 22:08

Wednesday, Mar 19, 2014 at 22:08
Absalutly any one around my age mention cb radio and youll get a simular response.
Cult film
Purely for the cb talk
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FollowupID: 811317

Follow Up By: crash53 - Thursday, Mar 20, 2014 at 08:24

Thursday, Mar 20, 2014 at 08:24
I was just reciprocating to GOM's comment in the same way that was presented "tongue in cheek" I thought he'd like it back.
It sounds like GOM is around the the same vintage as me, so a bit of sarcastic humour is a bit of fun.
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FollowupID: 811331

Reply By: scruffy - Wednesday, Mar 19, 2014 at 13:21

Wednesday, Mar 19, 2014 at 13:21
Maybe try just listening in for a while to get the hang of it all. Most don't use the old type movie jargon, unless you want to be called names [d...head, wan..r etc]. Bob
AnswerID: 528669

Reply By: Member - Scott M (NSW) - Wednesday, Mar 19, 2014 at 13:58

Wednesday, Mar 19, 2014 at 13:58
It's not really complex.

Identify yourself - be polite & friendly - don't waffle - keep it clear and succinct what you want - say thanks - and you'll find the majority of other road users will be more than willing to help.

There's probably one good basic rule - only say what you would be prepared to say to someone in person or to their face.

If you've got something to add to a conversation, by all means break in. For example if someone is talking or asking about road conditions / weather / fuel supplies etc. or having a good laugh - chime in. If they're talking about personal stuff or business .... best stay out.

Generally if you want to communicate to a truck or the road - usually they're on Ch 40 (except Ch 29 on Pacific Hwy) - something along the lines of "Red 40 series tray here - do you want to pass ?" will suffice - if you're in front of them - they'll figure it out quick. Also the signal strength will let them know you're close.
AnswerID: 528671

Reply By: Member - Tony H (touring oz) - Wednesday, Mar 19, 2014 at 15:15

Wednesday, Mar 19, 2014 at 15:15
When using the microphone hold it about 15cm from your mouth, hold the microphone/hand piece at right angles to your mouth SPEAK ACROSS the hand piece rather than into it........in a normal voice, don't shout, speak clearly.
You may want to learn the phonetic alphabet, it will help you a lot especially if you have poor reception or your trying to tell someone a 'difficult' name or a description of something.
Don't be afraid to use your radio.....because you think may sound silly or say something silly.......you will very quickly learn correct procedures & protocol .....practice makes perfect.
Language on the UHF can be 'colourful' at times especially in built up areas.....be aware of this, if there are sensitive ears around.
Insanity doesnt run in my family.... it gallops!

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AnswerID: 528673

Reply By: bluefella - Wednesday, Mar 19, 2014 at 15:26

Wednesday, Mar 19, 2014 at 15:26
If you get a reply from the truck tell him you will back off when he's out ready to overtake not before, a lot of drivers back off before (meaning well) the truck losses revs and momentum.
AnswerID: 528675

Follow Up By: Ross M - Wednesday, Mar 19, 2014 at 21:50

Wednesday, Mar 19, 2014 at 21:50
Possibly, better to ONLY back off when he is fully out in the overtaking lane and not when he is "ready to overtake", otherwise you will slow him and if he can't pull up at the same rate he will HIT you from behind.
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Follow Up By: bluefella - Wednesday, Mar 19, 2014 at 22:13

Wednesday, Mar 19, 2014 at 22:13
That's what I said !!!
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Follow Up By: Ross M - Wednesday, Mar 19, 2014 at 23:42

Wednesday, Mar 19, 2014 at 23:42
I saw it slightly different, if he is out there he is already on his way and not ready to. That is because of the momentum issue.
Me driving coaches and overtaking trucks and being overtaken by trucks means you must know for passenger safety and the overtaking process does begin when inline behind and not out in the other lane.

Cheers
Ross M
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FollowupID: 811326

Reply By: Motherhen - Wednesday, Mar 19, 2014 at 18:46

Wednesday, Mar 19, 2014 at 18:46
While it is best to monitor the highway channel (40 across most of the country), do not use this for chatter. If you want to have a conversation, make it clear to the other person which channel, eg 39, and continue the conversation with blocking the highway channel.

We usually identify ourselves eg "Bushtracker caravan to XXXXfreightlines truck, I see you there and will allow you to pass as soon as possible". The signal can travel for some distance and I have answer a call to "caravan" to find the caller was on a different road some kilometres away and therefore not calling us.

Forget what you have seen in the movies.

Motherhen
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AnswerID: 528693

Reply By: Member - Bucky - Thursday, Mar 20, 2014 at 07:50

Thursday, Mar 20, 2014 at 07:50
Best thing is to listen for a while, and call up when you need to.
Call for a "radio check" on Ch 40, if you feel that your UHF is not working, and do not be offended if nobody answers you, as nobody may be on line.

Around towns, ect you will learn "new swear words", and sometimes you can actually have some laughs at all the goings on, but in saying that I find the bigger the town, or city, the more "crap" clutters up the frequencies.

Some people think that they own certain frequencies, but there is no such "ownership"

Channel 40 is just considered "the call up channel", or "the sacred channel", and from there you can switch to a less used channel,, for "privacy", otherwise it's a free for all, as there is no control



AnswerID: 528710

Follow Up By: crash53 - Thursday, Mar 20, 2014 at 08:29

Thursday, Mar 20, 2014 at 08:29
Yes I do agree, sitting and listening to some of the "conversations" on the airwaves is interesting to say the least. I think the younger the person (only judging by the voice) the more colourful the language.Thanks for the tip on CH 40.
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Follow Up By: Member - Frank P (NSW) - Thursday, Mar 20, 2014 at 08:37

Thursday, Mar 20, 2014 at 08:37
Ch 11 is the call-up channel, not Ch 40.

Though no-one can "own" a channel on CB, by convention Ch 40 is the truckies' highway channel.

Cheers
FrankP

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Follow Up By: River Swaggie - Thursday, Mar 20, 2014 at 18:24

Thursday, Mar 20, 2014 at 18:24
Hi Bucky

That's why the higher channels from 40 to 80 can be a godsend.. It's easy to get stuck in the past and forget there available... Lol (Oh providing your unit sports this) .



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Reply By: Member - evaredy - Thursday, Mar 20, 2014 at 11:20

Thursday, Mar 20, 2014 at 11:20
Thanks again to the OP for posting this and those that replied.

At least now, I have a much better understanding on how to use the UHF.
AnswerID: 528712

Reply By: pepper2 - Thursday, Mar 20, 2014 at 13:22

Thursday, Mar 20, 2014 at 13:22
Isnt channel 5 monitered for distress calls , so best not to use it for general chat. (It is also in the duplex channels.)
AnswerID: 528720

Reply By: The Bantam - Thursday, Mar 20, 2014 at 14:20

Thursday, Mar 20, 2014 at 14:20
Unfortunately UHF CB is a free for all and there is in general no proper adherance to any sort of protocol.

If you have any involvement with civilised radio environments, like VHF marine ( on a good day), amateur radio or well run commercial systems you will find it frustrating.

From time to time this will $@!t you to tears.

All the lingo from the 27Meg CB days is pretty well out of use and despised.

Round the cities, UHF can be a cross between a cesspit and an asilum.

It starts to become usefull when you get more than a hour from the major cities & towns.

Don't expect "overs", proper identifacaton or any sort of structure or manners.

People just seem to talk and hope.

If you are calling a truckie, you have to identify them some how..... truck type, transport company or truck brand...if you know it...direction of travel...approximate location or road.

It may help to identify yourself...type of vehicle or whatever.

cheers
AnswerID: 528722

Reply By: Member - OzBadDude - Monday, Mar 24, 2014 at 17:09

Monday, Mar 24, 2014 at 17:09
Channel 10 is the channel used by 4WDers on the track.
AnswerID: 529007

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