Dual (possibly one more) Battery set up (incl. 3 way LPG Fridge)

After some thoughts on setting up a multiple battery system on the petrol 100 series. Have been doing heaps of reading so thought it time to check with the experts.

Things to charge/run while driving will be a couple of iPods, couple of phones, GPS, iPad, small laptop, couple of yet to be determined screens of some sort for the kids AND (my main concern) our 3 way fridge (Dometic F400).

The fridge isn't efficient on 12V and will draw 10amp/120w all the time, i.e. the dial does not work when on 12V. It does go very well on gas.

Initial thoughts are to get a Century N70ZZ4WD (starter) connect to a Century N70ZM (aux.) using a Redarc SBI12, Sidewinder DBi-100 or similar. Both these batteries will be in the engine bay.

Plan to run the fridge and some of the other devices from the N70M from an outlet in the back which is yet to be installed. Other devices will also be charged from the existing power sockets which will remain connected to the starter as standard.

Also, have been thinking of putting a smaller portable battery box with battery (not determined size yet) Initial thoughts are this will only run a handful of LED strips in the camper trailer) This will either be in the back of the car or in the trailer and have not worked out how this should be charged.

Connecting the 2 main batteries together via one of the above devices seems logical however after some reading, it looks like it's worthwhile running some decent sized dedicated cables (from aux.) just for the fridge alone as have seen some talk about cable heat and the like running 10amps continuously and trying to charge/run other small devices from this might not work so well.

Q1) In the above para, what are the thoughts on this dedicated cable? If I wanted to run other devices, would I just run more cables from the aux. and install some sockets or USB connections?

Q2) If I then wanted to charge another battery in the back (or in the camper), could I just use that second set of cables? Would I need to install a DC-DC charger?

I have a friend who has offered me his thumper while we are away however, it is very big and heavy and I had thought I wouldn't need anything too large to run the LEDs for a few days although I guess it does give me options to charge other gear while parked up.

Anyway, apologies if it's not clear as it's late and I'm trying to get it out of my head into this post.

Thanks, Richard
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Reply By: Grant Tas - Tuesday, May 20, 2014 at 23:48

Tuesday, May 20, 2014 at 23:48
Hi Richard
I have LC 100 GXV diesel with a triple battery set up.
Battery 1 and 2 are starting , battery 3 is a marine battery (aux) .
Between 2 and 3 ,I have a Sidewinder BDi 140r Isolator and a cabin monitor by Sidewinder.
I used 6 BS cable to link them together.
The monitor tells me the voltage on battery 2 and 3 , this also can link the batteries together.
From battery 3, I ran heavy cables through the chasis rail ending as a anderson plug for charging the caravan batteries.
Of that cable I used a heavy duty wire tap from Sidewinder up to hella socket to run my CFX50 fridge and again used heavy cable ( 6 BS).
My set up works for me I hope this helps
Cheers Grant
PS Derek from Sidewinder is a great help and is also a member.
AnswerID: 532859

Follow Up By: Richard N4 - Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at 09:19

Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at 09:19
Hi Grant,

Thanks for the info. Got some (thinking out loud) questions for you.

OK, so if I'm reading it right, batteries 1 and 2 are just directly connected together to effectively create one large starter.

Assuming 2 and 3 are under bonnet (since you have monitor on these 2) when you link 2 and 3 together wouldn't that also drag battery 1 into the equation too if directly connected? But I guess that could just be for an extra boost for starting or winching when required so not a big deal.

So, the cable from battery 3 goes to the caravan (via anderson) to charge the batteries there and is the fridge in the caravan also? Or is the fridge in the car? Do you have a DC-DC charger for the caravan batteries? The heavy duty wire tap to the hella socket is a split of some sort from this cable?

Had a quick check and your fridge is much more efficient on 12V than mine drawing 0.77Ah/h.

If I'm reading mine right, mine will draw 10Ah/h which is where my main concern is. However, it will only be on 12v while driving but is this still a big ask from alternator/battery 2 alone?

Blurb from specs for F400;
Battery operation 12V (DC)
Input 120W (10 Amps)
Energy consumption 240Ah/24h

cheers,
Richard
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FollowupID: 816154

Follow Up By: Batt's - Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at 10:54

Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at 10:54
You will not have any problem supplying power to the fridge while your car is running it's only drawing 10 amps your alternator will cover that easily it will be like driving with your headlights on. But as you know when you stop it will drain your battery in a few hours, it shouldn't be a problem if you stop for a lunch break or a fuel stop. When I had one yrs ago in a 4 runner with a single N70 battery if I was stopping for any longer than say 1 hr I would put it on gas I never had any problems.
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FollowupID: 816170

Follow Up By: Grant Tas - Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at 22:47

Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at 22:47
Hi Richard,
All the batteries are under the bonnet.
My Landcruiser 100 IFS turbo diesel which has twin starting batteries in the front.
The 3rd battery is located rear right. I have the isolator between 2 and 3. I only link 3 in when winching or have starting problems . The moniter tells me the volts going into batteries 2 and 3.
The fridge in the back is Waeco CFX 50 which does draw much and fridge in the caravan is 12 v compressor ( Vitrofrigo). The caravan fridge is powered by 3 x 120 amp AGM and backed up by the solar panels on the caravan roof.
I haven't needed a Dc to Dc charger as I have genie to back up as well.
Check the Sidewinder web site for more product details.
Hope this helps
Cheers
Grant
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FollowupID: 816225

Follow Up By: Richard N4 - Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at 23:19

Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at 23:19
OK, so when you're driving, the alternator is charging the 2 starters, then after a bit, the isolator will send power through to the 3rd battery as well as the van batteries at the same time?

Just thinking out loud, I guess my questions are, as there is no other isolator/charging devices between the 3rd and van batteries, is this effectively just one very large 12 volt battery?

While I'm still learning regarding alternator output, does this seem like a lot of charging going on after the starters have been charged? Do the 4 batteries ever get fully charged while driving?

thanks,
Richard
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FollowupID: 816229

Follow Up By: Grant Tas - Thursday, May 22, 2014 at 21:59

Thursday, May 22, 2014 at 21:59
Hi Richard,
Your right about the isolator it does send the power on to the 3 rd battery once 1 & 2 are full. I would think the alternator justs tops up the van batteries as the solar regulator controls the charging system in the van. The Anderson lead goes into a Voltage sensitivity relay in the van.
The system I've got seems to work well.
Cheers
Grant
1
FollowupID: 816297

Follow Up By: Richard N4 - Thursday, May 22, 2014 at 22:51

Thursday, May 22, 2014 at 22:51
OK, that was the bit I was missing, that there is a VSR into the batteries in the van so the 3rd battery will only push power through to the van when it's charged enough. Thanks.

And yes, have been all over Dereks website, thanks :-)
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FollowupID: 816300

Reply By: MUZBRY- Life member(Vic) - Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at 08:06

Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at 08:06
Gday
Funny how things have changed, on my first trip we didn't have an esky and only a car radio , no big sand tyres , no suspension lift , three gears to go forward and a small grey engine with about 70 hp..we did have an extra fuel tank just in case.



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AnswerID: 532867

Follow Up By: Richard N4 - Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at 09:41

Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at 09:41
You know, this is so true.

Some days I think to myself do I really need all this stuff, it just creates a headache and adds more stuff to go wrong and when it does, you either have to bin it or lug it with you as dead weight.

Having said that, the decision isn't just mine to make and it is nice to have cold beer.

I have talked with a couple of folk who did away with a fridge/esky altogether (because it got out of control) and just got fresh fruit/vege when they could and just dealt with out cold stuff. Some merit in this but again, not just my decision.

cheers,
Richard
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FollowupID: 816159

Reply By: Member - PJR (NSW) - Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at 08:46

Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at 08:46
Here's another option for you.

We run three Allrounder batteries with one wired up as a single and the other two wired together as accessory batteries. There is a 200 amp SDI22 between the single and dual setup.

All the car's standard wiring goes to the single main battery, including the winch, when I actually connect it. The winch is left with the positive lead disconnected, secured and ready for connection.

All 4WD and trailer battery power (not lights), accessories, including driving lights, two fridges goes and camping wiring goes to the accessory pair through a separate fuse box.

Personally I am not keen on carrying loose batteries, all-be-it in a good sturdy carry case. That's why we held out for ages looking for a suitable "third" battery box and/or someone to make us one.

All batteries are the same model giving us the flexibility to move them around if one breaks. A kind of inbuilt "spare". The 100 runs quite easily on one battery. Start can be a tiny bit sluggy on cold mornings but the accessory two can be switched on-line from inside the cabin. This only happened once in two years. The fridges run for at least two full days without any charge at all.

Phil


AnswerID: 532871

Follow Up By: Member - PJR (NSW) - Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at 11:09

Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at 11:09
I left a bit out. Got carried away.

There are three 50 amp cables that run to the back of the car for the accessory batteries.

One runs directly from the accessory battery to an Anderson socket on the rear bar via a 40 amp auto-reset circuit breaker. This is for any external use and for a trailer, van or camper. Never been used as yet.

The other two go to the rear of the cabin. Both run from the new fuse box and have a maximum capability of 30 amp. One is dedicated to the compressor and water pump. The other goes to several cigarette lighter outlets and runs the fridges and any charging functions including a bunch of USB sockets.

I will leave the charging question to others who may have done that.

Phil
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FollowupID: 816172

Follow Up By: Richard N4 - Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at 23:00

Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at 23:00
Hi Phil,

Nice setup. Guessing you mean the Redarc SBI212?

Really like the look of the fuse/distribution box, where did that come from? Saw something about marine shops are good for this kind of thing.

I hadn't thought about putting a third battery in the engine bay, mostly because right now I can't as there's an LPG system in the way although this is likely to be removed as I want to put a larger sub tank in (for greater range) which means the LPG has to go.

I guess my main concern is the fridge drawing so much juice but as mentioned above, it will only be while driving so should be ok. I think though if we go with this fridge, it will have it's own cables from aux. battery and another set to other cig. and USB sockets and another set to an anderson plug to connect to trailer.

thanks,
Richard
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FollowupID: 816227

Follow Up By: Member - PJR (NSW) - Thursday, May 22, 2014 at 08:50

Thursday, May 22, 2014 at 08:50
Yes Richard. It is the SBI212 200 amp solenoid/isolator.

We had the battery work done because on trips like the Simpson, and next the CSR, we wanted two fridges with one as a freezer to make it easier to stay remote for longer like three or four weeks. Some would say the freezer isn't necessary and so would I but bugger it, if you can do it why not. It;'s not needed for towing or recharging anything. That is for the grandkids and their "toys". We are only too happy to be "disconnected".

One son had LPG in his Prado and dumped it as soon as htarted going on more remote drives with us to the Simpson and likewise places. Not enough outlets for him to refil at. Then got a diesel Patrol and said he is much happier.

The fuse box is from Jaycar. It has a maximum load of 100 amps with each circuit having a maximum load of 30 amps. Just the ideal for 4WD accessories. If you prefer a Marine supplier then I suggest that you try Whitworths. Jaycar isn't far from here so I got it from them. I had a quick glance at Whitworths but couldn't see one that I would use. Maybe a water proof one would have been better. We had water lapping the wind screen on the Balfour Track so the fuse box could have been drenched. But it still works. (if you want to see the video search Google for "vk1dx Balfour track").

Phil

Jaycar 10 Way Blade Fuse Block with LED Indicators



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FollowupID: 816244

Follow Up By: Richard N4 - Sunday, May 25, 2014 at 22:54

Sunday, May 25, 2014 at 22:54
Thanks Phil, I think this may do the trick although I need to make sure I have the right amps going through the block.
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FollowupID: 816497

Follow Up By: Member - PJR (NSW) - Monday, May 26, 2014 at 08:17

Monday, May 26, 2014 at 08:17
You should be okay with one 40 amp min cable to the rear and use whatever socket you prefer. I have use good quality (from the same site) cigarette lighter ones.

We run two Engel fridges, a 40 as a fridge and a 20 as a feezer, from it and it is fused at 20 amps.

Phil
1
FollowupID: 816506

Reply By: Member - Andrew L (QLD) - Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at 08:52

Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at 08:52
Richard N4 "Things to charge/run while driving will be a couple of iPods, couple of phones, GPS, iPad, small laptop, couple of yet to be determined screens of some sort for the kids AND (my main concern) our 3 way fridge (Dometic F400)."

Except for the 3 way fridge, all those other items are low draw and will charge off the vehicle electrical system fed by the alternator while the engine is running.

Stick the 3 way in the camper for use on gas when based for a few days or more, get a compressor fridge for the car, support with a 2nd N70 size start battery and suitable wiring.
AnswerID: 532873

Follow Up By: Member - Scott M (NSW) - Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at 11:52

Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at 11:52
"Stick the 3 way in the camper for use on gas when based for a few days or more, get a compressor fridge for the car, support with a 2nd N70 size start battery and suitable wiring."

Funny Andrew, I was about to type that response word for word ... 3 ways aren't really designed to be in a car .... they're at their best when running off gas.
1
FollowupID: 816175

Follow Up By: Richard N4 - Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at 23:26

Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at 23:26
Hi Andrew and Scott,

Thanks, I'm thinking I might have to look into this. I have been trying not to spend any more money as it's costing a lot more money than we originally thought.

As my boss (not swmbo in this instance) says, "It's nothing money won't fix"

I'd like to be able to do this however the sad flaw in this plan is the fridge does not fit into the trailer with out set up! However, we were only ever looking to take one fridge so perhaps a new one might be in order.

thanks,
Richard
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FollowupID: 816232

Reply By: Wayne's 60 - Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at 10:46

Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at 10:46
Hi Richard,

No, I can't help to answer your specific question.

The following advice may be discounted by some members, and we are good with that.

Discard the 3 way fridge and obtain a compressor fridge.
While the 3 way is good working on gas (dependant on local area conditions) it WILL consume large amounts of energy.

Further to this.............
Will your standard alternator be able to supply the required power to run....
.. the vehicle?
.. all lighting .... headlights etc?
.. stereo, air con and DVD players?
.. charge ALL batteries
.. charge ALL batteries, while supplying enough power to run the (power hungry) fridge?

We have been caught out before and it is not easy to clutch start a vehicle with flat batteries.

We hope you get the answers you want and enjoy your touring.

Cheers,
Wayne & Sally.


AnswerID: 532881

Follow Up By: Richard N4 - Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at 23:34

Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at 23:34
Hi Wayne,

Nope, all good and reasonable points in my book.

Anyone know what a 2000 model 105 cruiser standard alternator puts out? I think I came across 80amps somewhere and you could upgrade to a 110amp one for reasonable money.

The more I think/read/research for what we want to do, it's looking like a compressor fridge and gearing up a bit more for 12 volt in camper.

This will instantly alleviate most of my concerns and also mean we will take one gas bottle less.

Oh dear, there's another ~1k gone plus a bit more in batteries, but perhaps less stress over all.

thanks,
Richard
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FollowupID: 816233

Follow Up By: Wayne's 60 - Thursday, May 22, 2014 at 09:24

Thursday, May 22, 2014 at 09:24
Hi Richard,

Thanks for your positive reply :-) it is nice to hear.

We had a three way fridge to start with, hence the comments regarding alternator output. A two hour trip at night left us short because the alternator couldn't keep up with the task of supplying sufficient power. Currently we have a 110 amp alternator supplying power to five batteries (2 vehicle & 3 camper) through manually switched solenoids

Also, if you are going to set up (cost wise) to run the three way fridge so that it will have the optimum performance platform ......... you may as well just go the simplistic route. BTW, the three way needs to be level ..... VERY LEVEL, to work while on gas and this can be a far bigger issue.

Have a hunt through E-bay, Gumtree and Cash Converters for a second hand compressor fridge. Our second hand 15 litre Engel still works a treat and is the emergency back up for our Waeco.

Good advice has been given in reply to your question and you will set yourself up with a system that suits your requirements, frequency of use and above all else, your budget.

Safe travels.

Cheers,
Wayne & Sally.


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FollowupID: 816245

Reply By: Member - Frank P (NSW) - Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at 12:03

Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at 12:03
Richard,

A while ago I had an Avan camper with its own battery and a 3-way fridge. In the car I had a second battery and a fridge at the back. I faced the same considerations as you.

I had a satisfactory result by using the isolator to switch on a 6 gauge 12V bus through to the Anderson at the back of the car and from the Anderson, through to the camper. This just became the supply for everything and is switched on when the engine is running and off when it isn't.

Up front, I had a dc-dc charger to charge the aux battery in the car. You may not need that if your alternator voltage is high enough (mine wasn't), or if you use a voltage boosting diode for the alternator.

There is a junction box at the back of the car, from which the car fridge/freezer and other power outlets are supplied. At this point you can make things more versatile (but a little more complicated) by using a load switching relay so that when the bus is powered, all your extras in the car run off the alternator, and when the bus is unpowered they run off the aux battery. This keeps everything powered when the engine is off, and for me had the benefit of having no load on the aux battery while it was being charged.

In the camper I had another junction box from which another dc-dc charger was powered to look after the camper battery. I believe that is a must-have due to the long cable run from engine bay to camper battery. Also from that junction I ran a short 8 gauge supply to the camper's 3-way fridge so it ran on 12V while driving. The long run of 6 gauge and the short run of 8 were perfectly adequate for the fridge - it had over 12V under load at the fridge while the car was running.

To give the DC-DC charger in the camper a fair go it is better to have the battery unloaded while charging, so again I had another load switching relay so that the fridge ran off the car alternator (via the bus) while the engine was running and off the camper battery whenever the bus was off. This had the advantage of keeping power to the fridge while on a short stop.

The relays are cheap and easy to get. (, eg Narva. You can get them from Repco, Supercheap, Peps, auto sparkies, etc. Jaycar sell an equivalent.

This system worked flawlessly for me for years.

Cheers

FrankP

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AnswerID: 532885

Follow Up By: Richard N4 - Thursday, May 22, 2014 at 00:10

Thursday, May 22, 2014 at 00:10
Hi Frank,

Phew, talk about throwing more info out there, I had to read your post about 3 times before I think I understood it!

I really like the idea of the load switching relays, it would take some thinking on how to set up though.

So, again, thinking out loud, you mention using the isolator as a switch? To confirm I've got it right, when the car is off, there are effectively 2 separate circuits, the main car (starter battery) circuit and the aux. circuit. The aux. circuit (aux. battery) is running everything you've cabled up to it when car is not running.

When you start up, and when the isolator kicks in, it then takes over all powering duties (effectively powering from alternator rather than battery?) and the aux. battery as well as the camper battery is then charged via their respective DC-DC chargers.

Got me thinking now, might need to draw myself a diagram.

thanks,
Richard
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FollowupID: 816234

Follow Up By: Richard N4 - Thursday, May 22, 2014 at 00:13

Thursday, May 22, 2014 at 00:13
Something like this?

ID=SY4073Jaycar - Automotive Relay 150A SPDT
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FollowupID: 816235

Follow Up By: Member - Frank P (NSW) - Thursday, May 22, 2014 at 12:56

Thursday, May 22, 2014 at 12:56
Hi Richard,

Yes, I think you have figured out my concept.

"The aux. circuit (aux. battery) is running everything you've cabled up to it when car is not running".
Within the car, yes. When the engine is stopped the Anderson is dead, which is one of the reasons I did it this way. I don't like the idea of relatively high-current live terminals being left unattended. So when the engine is stopped there's no supply to the trailer, so back there everything is dead unless you use a load switching relay to energise the circuits you want off the trailer battery.

"When you start up, etc"
Yes, your understanding of that is correct.

A picture's worth a thousand words, will post a diagram of my setup when I can. ATM unable to insert a picture file - gremlins are about.

Cheers
FrankP

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FollowupID: 816263

Follow Up By: Member - Frank P (NSW) - Thursday, May 22, 2014 at 14:14

Thursday, May 22, 2014 at 14:14
Here's my circuit diagram. I'm not an auto sparkie, and just looking at it now (after a few years), some of the fuse values are a bit illogical, so corrections won't offend.

Richard,

I don't have a dfiagram for the trailer's load switching, but you should be able to copy the logic from the pic below.

If you want a diagram I'll knock one up. Just ask here.

Cheers

FrankP

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FollowupID: 816272

Follow Up By: Richard N4 - Thursday, May 22, 2014 at 23:10

Thursday, May 22, 2014 at 23:10
Hi Frank,

Really like your concept and your drawing, thanks for taking the time to put it together. Thanks for the offer of a diagram however I reckon I can follow your pic well enough.

Regarding the spot where the Redarc is, how would the SY4073 work here? Also, not an auto sparkie, but is it just a dumb switch which would disconnect the two "circuits" when car not running and then as soon as the car started it would send through power regardless of whether it's seeing a certain level of volts as the Redarc would?

Also, just to confirm, the 68044 is the isolating switch if car powered off in this instance? So if it sees power coming from the "in line" (86?) it switches to that otherwise power comes from 87a.

Which fuse values were illogical?

Unless I'm missing something this seems like a relatively economical way of doing things as well, esp. if I don't need a DC-DC charger.

thanks.

PS I'm guessing since no one else has chimed in here (to poo poo*) , it's a pretty well designed system which looks like it should work well?

*That's what normally happens on forums....... ;-)
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FollowupID: 816302

Follow Up By: Richard N4 - Thursday, May 22, 2014 at 23:21

Thursday, May 22, 2014 at 23:21
If I've got this right, if there was a SY4073 where the Redarc is and you were to turn the key to On (but not start) would it send power to the andersen plug and the through the 68044 and end up powering the fridge and other gear?
So perhaps the Redarc (or similar) is required until there's enough juice to power stuff?

Learning, learning......
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FollowupID: 816303

Follow Up By: Member - Frank P (NSW) - Friday, May 23, 2014 at 11:19

Friday, May 23, 2014 at 11:19
'Morning Richard

"Regarding the spot where the Redarc is, how would the SY4073 work here?"
You got it right in your second follow-up (816303). I originally drew this up a few years ago for someone who wanted to copy my system and queried the need for a voltage sensitive relay (Redarc SBI), so I put the SY4073 in there in answer to his query, but there was qualifying text in the accompanying email. I think the Redarc or similar VSR is the better way to go. If you wanted the less smart system I wouldn't now recommend an SY4073 - a simple, more rugged dumb solenoid would be more appropriate, I think.

"Also, just to confirm, the 68044 is the isolating switch if car powered off in this instance? So if it sees power coming from the "in line" (86?) it switches to that otherwise power comes from 87a."
Correct.

"Which fuse values were illogical?"
Maybe there should be a 60A fuse/CB BEFORE the Redarc as well as or instead of - need sparkie advice on that.
Possibly the fuses on the 86, 87a and 30 lines to/from the 68044 should all be the same, with values to suit your loads and cabling.

Just for the heck of it, here's a suggested wiring setup for your camper. :


Cheers



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FollowupID: 816333

Follow Up By: Richard N4 - Sunday, May 25, 2014 at 22:47

Sunday, May 25, 2014 at 22:47
Thanks Frank. Looks good and I'm about to write a list of parts required.

I think it will look exactly the same as what you've drawn except I'm going to remove the DC-DC charger and see how I fare. If it doesn't provide enough juice to charge then obviously I'll put one in. We have a couple of weeks travelling up the east coast (from Sydney) so I'll be able to source one if required.

I have been debating on where to put the 3rd battery however for a number of reasons I think I'll put it into the trailer in the toolbox on the A frame, it's then secure, out of the cabin and locked in.

Again, thanks for your time and effort, forums are great things.
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FollowupID: 816496

Follow Up By: Richard N4 - Sunday, May 25, 2014 at 23:07

Sunday, May 25, 2014 at 23:07
Actually, just looking at it, did you (or would you) run 3 dedicated cables from the isolator "out" terminal?
1) Aux. battery
2) Anderson plug
3) Relay for internal appliances

I liked the idea of the distribution box (Phil mentions) above for this directly after the isolator however the ratings aren't going to work with this particular box but might just search for another one with higher ratings.
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FollowupID: 816498

Follow Up By: Member - Frank P (NSW) - Monday, May 26, 2014 at 10:08

Monday, May 26, 2014 at 10:08
Good morning Richard,

Yes, that's exactly what I did. I used individual circuit breakers to suit load and cable size. There is a selection about half way down this page.

These are pretty neat and compact, but I have had problems with blade fuses at higher currents. Three times I've had melted assemblies, one a maxi type fused at 40A, carrying 30A. I ditched them all and use breakers from the Sidewinder list.

Cheers
FrankP

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FollowupID: 816514

Follow Up By: Member - Frank P (NSW) - Monday, May 26, 2014 at 10:14

Monday, May 26, 2014 at 10:14
If space is a problem, don't overlook something like these. Not as pretty, but they'd do the job.
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FollowupID: 816515

Reply By: Richard N4 - Tuesday, Jun 03, 2014 at 22:50

Tuesday, Jun 03, 2014 at 22:50
OK, been busy at work and have only just got back to this.

Have bought a couple of batteries, both Century, one 4WD and one Marine Pro. Have installed both but only connected up the starter. A friend has lent us his 90AH thumper (with the 600W inverter) and haven't decided where to put this yet, back of car or tool box on A frame of trailer being the options.

In the beginning, I'm going to keep it as simple as I can and follow the fairly standard route and just put an isolator, (probably a Sidewinder DBi-140R or possibly a Bi150), between the starter and aux.
From the aux., I will then run a dedicated Anderson to the rear (either in the back or out to the trailer) for the thumper and another cable to the rear of the car and connect up to a distribution box of some kind. I think I will need a DC-DC charger just before the thumper to keep it happy, although I wonder if I try it without for a bit to see what happens??
AnswerID: 533692

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