Kakadu Crocodile Attack

Submitted: Saturday, Jun 07, 2014 at 23:51
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52 year old man pulled from his boat. Police say the man was attacked when he was in a boat on a billabong at Cooinda late on Saturday afternoon.

Is it time to investigate crocodile management.?

Call for review of crocodile management

An Aboriginal corporation representing traditional owners in Kakadu National Park is calling for a review of crocodile management around their communities.

The Gundjeihmi Aboriginal Corporation says the Mirarr people and other traditional owners have managed the land for tens of thousands of years, compared to the Commonwealth's 30 years.

It says the Federal Government must listen to the advice of local people and review crocodile populations and safety concerns.

Corporation spokesman Justin O'Brien says it is only in recent decades that crocodile attacks have become an issue.

He says over-management of the park has led to more crocodile-related incidents.

"Our senior traditional owner Yvonne Margarula has told me she would swim just here at Mula Island billabong when she was a girl in the 1970s and '80s," he said.

"The [crocodile] numbers were low and, importantly ... crocodiles had a fear of humankind.

"Over the past 40-plus years since the protection laws have been in place, all that has changed."

Culling would create more problems, expert says

But a Darwin crocodile expert says culling is not the best way to stop crocodile attacks in the Northern Territory.

Crocodylus Park chief scientist Charlie Manolis says it would create more problems than it would solve.

"I always worry a little bit about just going in and ... trying to cull and reduce numbers," he said.

"What that does with a lot of salties is they will just go to ground and you won't see them at all.

"It may give people a false sense of security."

Mr Manolis says data collected over 30 years shows crocodile populations in some rivers are increasing slowly.

"But the biggest thing is that the average size of crocodiles is getting bigger and bigger and bigger," he said.

"The average saltie might be 3.5 metres, four metres long now, whereas 20 years ago they might have only been one and 1.5 metres long.

"They might not be increasing so much in numbers but their average size is increasing."

He says more education about crocodile safety is needed for Indigenous communities in remote areas.

He says recent research shows a high proportion of crocodile attacks in the Territory have involved Indigenous people.
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Reply By: Member - Stuart and Gunny - Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 00:54

Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 00:54
You will not be popular on this site for telling the truth and stating facts.
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Follow Up By: bgreeni - Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 02:27

Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 02:27
I lived in Darwin in the 61 ' s. We used to regularly camp for weekend's in what is now Kakadu. Regularly swam and fished in the rivers and waterholes. Never saw a crop.
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Reply By: Member - Peter H1 (NSW) - Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 08:10

Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 08:10
In the 60's there was good money to be made selling croc skins. then they became protected. Then came the farms and still good money to be made.
If culling allowed by hunters who then sold the skins, the farms would be most upset and demand gov protection for their industry.

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Reply By: Winner W - Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 10:03

Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 10:03
A matter of time with the crazy idea of swimming a fish in croc country from the boat before you release it . Easy target for a croc with your arms in the water.
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Reply By: The Bantam - Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 10:56

Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 10:56
The first hurdle to cross is the notion that Crocodiles are endangered.....they are not..plainly.

So what justification is there for the complete protection of them.

This complete protection has alloowed the number to increase out of proportion with the natural balance......for 20 000 years before white settlement the local black fellas would have hunted crocodiles and feasted on their eggs.

You think the men of the tribe would have tolerated a crock near them, that was endangering their women & kids.....no way....they would have gone after it and either driven it away or killed it and eaten it.

Those black fellas are now under represented in the environment....even if they where allowed, there are not enough of em to keep the crock numbers down.

So we have an unnatural sutuation that has allowed crocks to thrive out of proportion.


As far as this whole culling wont work thing........there will always be those saying this or that wont work.


These scientists can't have it both ways...... the same scientists will tell us that hunting/ fishing pressure can endanger a spicies....then they turn arround and tell us that hunting and fishing pressure can not controll numbers.

Its not rocket science.....if you start shooting crocks that will restore their fear of man, and if you shoot the big ones that will reduce the risk considerably...if you shoot plenty ( there are plenty) that will reduce the population and make things safer for man.

While crocks have a small brain they are far from stupid.....if you shoot or trap any crock that comes into a particular area frequented by man......crocks will recognise this and tend to steer clear.

This whole mamby pamby politically correct pseudo scientific approch is endangering people.

Are crocodiles more important than people........seriously...this IS the question.

It is as simpe as shooting or trapping anything that come close to areas frequented by humans.....relocating does not work


As with most of these environmental issues....there is a great deal of difference between the facts and the emotions


chers
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Follow Up By: The Explorer - Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 11:20

Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 11:20
Who said they were endangered?

That are listed under state legislation in Queensland as "vulnerable", and in WA they are Listed as "Other specially protected fauna". Overall they are obviously pretty common, in NT at least. Fact of the matter is that ALL native fauna species are protected by one law or another unless otherwise excluded by other forms of legislation.

I personally have no problem with controlling numbers in some form or another if actually warranted...but I still wont be going swimming anywhere near where they hang out just because some unknown home trained super environmental scientist with all the answers on a travel forum says all crocs will become fearful of humans if you go out and shoot a few.

Cheers
Greg
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Follow Up By: Bigfish - Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 11:20

Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 11:20
Another subject you are an expert on Bantam. So anything that is a danger to human life must be obliterated. Well hand your drivers licence in, stop sport, etc.etc...and for your info..relocating does work!!
I,ve seen the big lizards floating belly up in creeks after the pro fishermen visit an area!! Not newsworthy though. Don't worry..Quite a few large crocs are shot every year by poachers, red neckers and local graziers/farmers/community elders.

A huge problem is the idiot anglers who fillet fish at the waters edge, allow their dogs to frolic in the water and stand at the waters edge fishing.

Most crocs cull the idiots who take no notice of signs, don't listen to other peoples warnings or are too bleep for their own good. Swimming in crocodile waters is the biggest taker of lives. I have met many black fellas and they all should know better. I,ve seen em chasing rays 200 mts off shore in muddy waters up to their waist. In Arnhem Land where crocs can be plentiful. Had a fellow worker taken 20 years ago AFTER he was warned not to swim in a certain area!!! Girl taken in Darwin area last year..ignored the signs.

Everthing in this world is here for a reason. Man is a late comer and a bloody disease on the environment. The idea that we simply eliminate anything we have a problem with is childish and naïve. We have been here for a couple of hundred years and only ASSUME we know how nature works in this land.

Not a greenie but I get bleep off at idiots that want anything killed because it gets in the way of someone. There is a balance.
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Follow Up By: philw - Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 12:30

Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 12:30
Here here Bigfish. Look at the recent Shark Cull in W.A.
Not a single Great White captured but dozens of Tiger Sharks,which have not been implicated in one single fatal attack in that region.
Anyhow,who controlled the Croc numbers,before White settlement??
Did the local natives cull them? I doubt it very much.
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Follow Up By: The Bantam - Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 12:31

Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 12:31
Ya don't have to be an expert to recognise dogs balss when you see them. The issues in this matter are "dogs balls obvious".

typical of the emotional responses that dominate the debate.

some people have no time for common sence.

cheers
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Follow Up By: Hairy (NT) - Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 13:00

Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 13:00
Gday Bantam,
While I agree there are a lot more crocs around these days and there should be something done about them I cant help but laugh at some of your so called facts....Bwahahahahahaha........
Like
"Those black fellas are now under represented in the environment....even if they where allowed, there are not enough of em to keep the crock numbers down." What a croc! LOL....How many Black fellas with guns do you need to shoot a few crocs?
and
"Its not rocket science.....if you start shooting crocks that will restore their fear of man, and if you shoot the big ones that will reduce the risk considerably" Dead crocs don't talk? How will his mates hear about it? May be in the news after his autopsy? LOL
and
"It is as simpe as shooting or trapping anything that come close to areas frequented by humans.....relocating does not work"
Have you any idea how big Australia is, how many places are frequented by people and how hard it is to get in to some of these places????? And what's the difference between relocating and shooting? Gone is gone?.....

Hahahahaha
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Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 13:08

Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 13:08
Bantam,

Do you mean we'll have to shoot all the crocs, to protect Darwin Award participants like these, in this article from NT News?

http://www.ntnews.com.au/lifestyle/fishing/youve-croc-to-be-kidding/story-fnkchy3h-1226813789722

Total culling is too much like the WA White Pointer scheme.

Bob

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Follow Up By: Steve - Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 13:45

Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 13:45
to be fair Bob, he didn't actually suggest that - just that we need to look at the total protection of them

Always black and white, thses issues and rarely room for a debate in between without all the emotion
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Follow Up By: Hairy (NT) - Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 13:52

Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 13:52
"It is as simpe as shooting or trapping anything that come close to areas frequented by humans"
That would suggest all crocs in Darwin.......
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Follow Up By: Member - Trouper (NSW) - Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 14:34

Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 14:34
Bantam......With you 100% on that statement

Jeff
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Follow Up By: The Bantam - Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 14:53

Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 14:53
Yeh well there is another notion that people don't seem to grasp.

Just because, lower animals don't publish news papers, broadcast on radio or TV ot post of internet forums....it does not follow that they don't communicate or are not aware of what is going on arround them.

remember that crock that you did not see...well he probably saw Big Freddy shot in the head.....likewise he probably heard the swearing and cursing from Gorgeous George while he was in the trap...and heard all about Agro Annie having her eggs stolen from her nest.

Animals may not be as inteligent as humans, but they are far from stupid and uncommunicative.

As far as shooting all the crocks in Darwin......yeh well may be......From what my relatives tell me...there are plenty arround there.


remember the words of El Guapo......" I like these guys....Kill one of them"

To dramaticly reduce the threat to humans......you don't have to kill em all...just the bigger ones, the agressive ones and the ones that repeatedly seek out places where humans frequent.

Restoring the fear of humans is a big part of the equasion.

I'm not talking about making it safe to let ya toddler swim unsupervised....I'm talking about reducing the risk of people being taken who have taken reasonable steps or are in places or doing things that it is reasonable to be safe doing.


Its not like this is a new concept...its not like it has not been done before

Cheers
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Follow Up By: The Bantam - Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 15:04

Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 15:04
As for relocation.

Crocks are able to navigate very efficiently over land and in the water over considerable distances...like hundreds of KM

There are reported cases of crocks with tracking gear on them making very interestng and epic journies with considerable sections across land to access other river systems.


Anybody remember the Bohle River crock that ended up at Magnetic Island.

Well it had been relocated a long way south to a river system between Townsville and Ayre....well over 100Km as the crock swims from its home teritory.

It was found on Magnetic island..almost certainly on its way home.

cheers
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Follow Up By: Hairy (NT) - Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 15:30

Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 15:30
Not too many find there way home from the croc farm?
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Follow Up By: Member - Terry W4 - Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 18:30

Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 18:30
They have found 'his remains' Condolences to his family.

However one time I was out at Cahill's Crossing into Arnhem Land on the East Alligator I saw stupid fishers waste deep in water at a time when the salties come in on the tide and at a place that there had been at least 3 fatalities in the previous couple of years. The huge signs warning about crocs were being ignored.

I took pics from a viewing platform. One of the locals said to me that fishing here is a spectator sport as we all waited for the attack and for me to get the pic which would ensure my financial future. Didn't happen of course.

Next trip maybe.
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Reply By: Member - KBAD - Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 11:12

Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 11:12
Fist let me say commiseration's to the family.
As someone who has lived in the NT and worked taking tours on the Mary River and at Mardugal billabong which is on the same system as the attack. IMO it was only a matter of time before we saw increased levels of interaction, increased numbers of people and animals whose size, i agree with the comments previously posted have grown in size. To compare the numbers and the animals behaviour to what was happening in the sixties and the seventies is impossible as they were rarely seen then being hunted almost completely out of a lot of areas.
Going onto one of the river systems you are taking risks, there are large crocs nearby, as i said I lived and worked there for a while and had a few close calls, and i was very croc aware.
The animals that are creating a lot of problems at the moment are not afraid of humans at all, they have had not adverse interactions with them, so you are just another animal they will deal with, not a predator actively hunting them. Tom Cole documented an interesting experience when he was hunting crocodiles in his book "Hell West and Crooked" where after starting to shoot crocs in a billabong he came back to find that three of the animals had started to walk out to escape what was happening which to me shows understanding that they were being hunted and were no longer safe in that billabong.
Having said that i don't think culling numbers will work for a couple of reasons one people will never be allowed to cull them to a level where there will be none there, so there will always be a risk.
Large animals while they appear to be the ones that will cause the most worry are usually more wary of humans and less likely to want to interact, (unless you are being very incautious, or it is breeding season when they become very territorial).
As with most of nature it does reach a balance, so numbers will plateau but larger animals will be the norm rather than the exception like in the eighties and early nineties.
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Reply By: Bob Y. - Qld - Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 11:33

Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 11:33
We had couple of excursions on Yellow waters, at Cooinda, on 2 different visits to Kakadu.

Plenty of crocs there, and many are quite oblivious to humans and their boats. We saw some that were on the bank, and we would have been within 5 metres of them, and they didn't give a stuff. The little bloke below tolerated us within 3 metres, before he casually slide back into the water.



When I worked in the Kimberley in late '60's/early '70's, I saw 1 saltie in 6 years, even though I spent that time on the Victoria, East & West Baines and Keep Rivers. They'd been shot out alright, but no one, with even half a brain, ever went swimming where they were known to be.

No word of how this bloke was taken that I'm aware of yet, but the suggestion that he was "swimming" a barra is quite possible. Talking to a bloke the other day and he wasn't keen on some of the "tea-pot" sized dinghys that blokes use, in croc country.

Bob.

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Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 13:29

Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 13:29
I mistakenly thought the tragedy occurred on Yellow Waters, @ Cooinda. Have since read that it was on South Alligator River, near Cooinda.

A sad and anxious time for his family and friends.

Bob


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Reply By: Ron N - Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 12:31

Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 12:31
In the 1960's, crocodiles were hunted as often as possible. Crocs were fearful of Man. Nearly everyone had an ex-military .303 when they went out on the Northern rivers and billabongs - and if a croc head appeared, it always got a few rounds loosed off at it.

Forward to 2014, and crocs have been protected for over 30 yrs, and they no longer fear Man. In addition, the numbers of both crocs and Man have increased by large amounts.
As a result, crocs only see us as another meal - and an increasingly plentiful one at that.

Crocs will need to be culled where the increasing numbers of population in croc areas result in increased amounts of croc attacks. The more people get taken, the louder the cry to do something about the "croc problem".
AnswerID: 534001

Follow Up By: DBN05 (tas) - Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 13:10

Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 13:10
have to agree with Ron N I lived in Darwin in the late 50's till 63 we used to go shotting at humpty doo when it was rice fields. Any croc we saw took off at a great pace as everybody had them in their sights.

As for culling is it going to stop attacks ? who knows But just maybe, should we be feeding them just to rake in a few dollars from the backpackers/tourist so they can get a photo of crocs jumping to take a dead chicken off a pole ??

would I walk around the swamps etc in and around Darwin and nightcliffe now, no way.

Are there more crocs now or has old age caught up with me YES

my two pence for what it is worth.
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Follow Up By: Ron N - Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 19:48

Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 19:48
DBN05 - Yep, I don't think the crocs should be fed just to entertain the tourists.
It just makes the crocs less fearful of Man, and the bigger ones become less choosey at what looks like a meal, after being hand fed.

Crocs are exceptionally cunning, their stalking ability is legendary. They're like crows - they can figure out who has gone where, who has disappeared, and who hasn't - and they can figure out patterns of behaviour.
Keep turning up at the same spot every day where salties frequent, and stand right on the waters edge or in knee-deep water to cast your line, and you can guarantee they'll be watching and waiting for you.

I can still see the salties waiting on the mud below the little floating boat jetty at Wyndham in the late 90's, when the BIL was Sgt in charge of Wyndham police station.
They were huge and fearless, and they wouldn't move when you walked along the jetty just a couple of metres above them.
I can well imagine they were carefully sizing up the amount of jump needed to snatch us off the jetty.
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Reply By: Hairy (NT) - Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 13:11

Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 13:11
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Follow Up By: Hairy (NT) - Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 13:14

Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 13:14
Another case of a curious croc...........other than the engine cover and jocks, no real damage.
But a smaller boat or people panicking and running to one side of the boat things could have been a lot different!
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Reply By: veight - Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 13:15

Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 13:15
This info has been taken from the NT News Facebook page.

CROC ATTACK: Police say they have had no luck after searching through the night for a man who was taken by a crocodile while on a boat in front of shocked family members at the South Alligator River yesterday afternoon. Jabiru Police, Gunbalanya Police, officers from the Water Police section and Park Rangers are continuing to search for the man and the crocodile at the site of the attack. The initial police report stated the man to be 52 years old; this has been corrected to 62

LIST OF CROC ATTACKS

JANUARY 26, 2014: A 12-year-old boy goes missing after he was taken by a crocodile while swimming behind Mudginberri outstation about 20km west of Jabiru. Another boy, 15, was bitten on the arm but escaped before the croc turned on the other boy in front of friends.

AUGUST 24, 2013: A crocodile killed a 26-year-old man while swimming in the Mary River near the Mary River Wilderness Retreat, about halfway between Darwin and Kakadu National Park.

DECEMBER 1, 2012: A 4m crocodile killed a nine-year-old boy who was swimming with friends at a Territory beach at Port Bradshaw near Dhania outstation, 100km south of Nhulunbuy.

NOVEMBER 16, 2012: A 3m crocodile killed a seven-year-old girl who was swimming at a waterhole at Gumarrirnbang outstation about 110km southwest of Maningrida.

FEBRUARY 20, 2011: A crocodile killed a 14-year-old boy playing in a creek with his brothers in Milingimbi 450km east of Darwin.

APRIL 2009: Father-of-two Keith Parry, 20, was killed by a 4m croc while trying to swim across the Daly River, south of Darwin.

MARCH 2009: 11-year-old Briony Goodsell was taken at Black Jungle Swamp at Lambells Lagoon in Darwin’s rural area while swimming with her sister and two friends.

JULY 2006: A 5m crocodile killed an eight-year-old girl as she fished with her family on the Blythe River.

SEPTEMBER 2005: Darwin man Russell Butel, 55, was killed off the Cobourg Peninsula, while diving with a mate in Trepang Bay.

SEPTEMBER 2005: A 4m croc killed Russell Harris, 37, while he snorkelled off Groote Eylandt in the Gulf of Carpentaria.

DECEMBER 2003: A 4m croc killed Brett Mann, 22, while he cleaned his quad bike in the Finniss River, 100km south of Darwin. His two friends spent 22 hours up a tree waiting to be rescued while the croc stalked them below.

OCTOBER 22, 2002: Isabel von Jordan, a 24-year-old student from Germany, was killed by a 5m saltwater crocodile in Kakadu National Park’s Sandy Creek billabong while swimming with a group of tourists.

DECEMBER 23, 1998: Peter Munkara, 34, an artist from Melville Island, was found near the island’s Paru boat ramp with crocodile bite marks on his body.

AUGUST 7, 1998: The body of a man in his 20s was found in the Roper River, 500km southeast of Darwin, believed to be a victim of a croc attack.

DECEMBER 13, 1997: A man was killed trying to swim across the Daly River, 230km south of Darwin.

MAY 11, 1990: Albert Juzelionas, 43, a Jabiru Telecom worker, was killed while swimming off Groote Eylandt.

OCTOBER 1988: Alex Bururru, 25, of Maningrida, was killed in Cato River near Nhulunbuy, NT.

MARCH 17, 1987: Kerry McLoughlin, 40, a Jabiru storeman, was decapitated by a 5.1m crocodile while wading at Cahills Crossing on the East Alligator River in Kakadu. He threw a beer can at its head to try to escape.
AnswerID: 534004

Reply By: Bigfish - Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 14:43

Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 14:43
EVERYONE of them took place in well known crocodile waters. Exception was probably in March 2009 (young Briony)..however that was posted as crocs had been seen in area. Russell Butel , an acquaintance, was diving in waters frequented by crocs. He knew the risks, but was a tropical fish collector. Don't blame a wild animal for doing what is natural. Sad events, all of them, but nearly everyone preventable.
AnswerID: 534010

Reply By: Emerging I.T. - Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 18:30

Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 18:30
We're talking about a reptile that survived the extinction of the dinousaurs. Thriving in a protected environment. When they are pulling people out of a boat they are killers just like the murderers we put in jail, they are pushing further south now because they are running out of room. I spent 3 days in the Glyde River NT on a boat, there were literally thousands of them in that river alone. More lives will be lost, attacks are on a sharp rise due to the population. We cull Kangaroos but not crocodiles, yet one is a man eater. Time to look at it again I reckon.
AnswerID: 534019

Follow Up By: Member - Terry W4 - Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 18:37

Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 18:37
It is actually a dinosaur methinks.
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Follow Up By: Emerging I.T. - Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 18:45

Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 18:45
No they are not a dinosaur.
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Follow Up By: Bigfish - Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 19:28

Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 19:28
Spent 15 years in the areas around the Glyde. Huge overstatement saying there are thousands of them in any particular area. In the vast majority of places people have been taken, apart from being foolish, the areas are remote. I believe the chap just killed was also leaning out of the boat swimming a barra...Obviously he had no idea about the environment he was in. .I've said it before and I'll say it again. People go into these areas are bloody clueless about what they do! They are a magnificent hunter. Been around for tens of thousands of years. Man will be lucky if we, as a species are around for another 500. The big ones are not the danger. The smaller cheeky ones of 2-3 meters are growing in confidence around man. Anglers still feed them fish carcases, still clean fish on the river banks. Now they associate boats with fish! We even teach em to jump for bits of chicken or fish!! People go into the croc areas, disregard any warning and carry on as though they are in a park.
Not time to cull...time to make people use their bloody brain!!!
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Follow Up By: Emerging I.T.- Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 22:22

Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 22:22
Big Fish you can defend them all you like, call them great hunters, your missing the point. You state all the obvious things we already know but you don't address the loss of lives. The more crocs the more people will die, it's that simple. The question here is about balance, have the crocs tipped the scales their way? Yes he was washing a bucket, yes that not too smart, they have also gone ashore and pulled people out of tents, I ask this...is it time to re-visit culling or some form of control? Their numbers are growing exponentially and it's simply not sustainable. The more crocs the more people will die, mark my words? Somebody has to make a call eventually...
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Reply By: howesy - Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 18:37

Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 18:37
If the greenies and environmentalists insist on not killing them and the general opinion is that they have lost their fear of us then whats wrong with shooting the crap out of any one that raises its head in certain areas using high powered bean bags like used in riot control,,, it might just shock and frighten crap out of them enough to instill that fear of man again over time.

Just a thought
AnswerID: 534020

Follow Up By: mikehzz - Monday, Jun 09, 2014 at 01:05

Monday, Jun 09, 2014 at 01:05
Greenies and conservationists can't insist on anything. They can only argue a case to the government as can all of us if we want. The government makes the law, not the greenies. If you don't like how things are, don't blame greenies because the buck stops with the government.
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Reply By: Emerging I.T. - Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 18:41

Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 18:41
His remains have been found, 2 crocs feeding on him I am told, both crocs have now been shot. The cycle of croc eats man and then gets shot is a reactive one. It won't change a thing and they will continue to attack as they now have no fear of man.
AnswerID: 534023

Reply By: Top End Az - Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 19:54

Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 19:54
If the greenies are opposed to crocodile management strategies to control numbers then I guess we could drop a few hundred salties into Sydney Harbour to alleviate the numbers here in the NT.
AnswerID: 534033

Follow Up By: Member - PhilD_NT - Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 21:26

Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 21:26
I'd go one step further and drop a bunch of snapping handbags and a tipper truck load of breeding female Cane Toads in Lake Burley Griffin in early Summer to get their attention.
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FollowupID: 817532

Follow Up By: Hairy (NT) - Monday, Jun 09, 2014 at 10:05

Monday, Jun 09, 2014 at 10:05
Ya reckon they might have a different opinion about crocs when its their lives being affected by them? I sometimes think their are a lot of people who think the NT is just a holiday destination for the Eastern States not someone's home........ Ill cop it now I reckon. LOL
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Follow Up By: Batt's - Monday, Jun 09, 2014 at 21:00

Monday, Jun 09, 2014 at 21:00
If you want to live in the Northern part of Oz you learn to live with crocs that's what I have managed to do it's amazingly easy ya no. They've been here longer than man but in our infinite wisdom we believe we should control everything but all we do is stuff things up. Lets kill everything so we can protect our favourite fishing or camping spot. Most people taken are doing stupid things that they shouldn't have people need to wise up a bit because crocs are getting bigger and smarter now just like they were once so we need to wise up a bit. Wait till the day they get to 30 feet again but that won't happen because we'll kill it before then because it won't suit us. It's a shame more people don't learn to appreciate what we have here and learn to live with it and maybe be a little bit in awe of how nature works and the size of some of it's creatures. The other solution if you can't possibly learn to live with them then move but remember Oz is full of deadly creatures so you'll have something else to pick on.
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Reply By: Iza B - Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 20:44

Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 20:44
Latest news report I saw says he was washing a bucket over the side. I hope that is not the real story. Having lost several fish at the side of the boat to these animals, leaning over the side making splashes is asking for trouble. These animals are opportunists and will take those opportunities. Being safe in the croc waters is all about thinking about how a croc might see what you are doing.

Iza
AnswerID: 534035

Reply By: Emerging I.T. - Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 22:48

Sunday, Jun 08, 2014 at 22:48
Since 1970 their numbers have increased approximately at a rate of 100 for every 1. They have also gotten bigger. My point is, at this sort of growth rate we are quickly running out of room, they will push further south due to territorial instinct. Eventually something has to give, at what point do we say that's too many people who have lost their lives? I think it's a fair argument, perhaps not now but we are heading for a collision course with a man eater. Let's wait and see...?
AnswerID: 534044

Follow Up By: Bigfish - Monday, Jun 09, 2014 at 06:04

Monday, Jun 09, 2014 at 06:04
The point is this....90% of these people killed virtually asked for it.. YOU DO NOT SWIM IN CROCODILE WATERS. SIMPLE. Crying out later is crap.

No one in their right mind swims in a billabong, unless it is many miles inland and proven safe!

So idiots disobey the signs and the crocs get the blame. Typical redneck reaction.
Ask yourself....would you swim in waters known to be frequented by crocodiles?...90% of those killed said yes.........Their decision but one that is lunacy.
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FollowupID: 817546

Follow Up By: get outmore - Monday, Jun 09, 2014 at 12:27

Monday, Jun 09, 2014 at 12:27
Spot on - the protection of crocodiles has been a huge success ---- but now people are complaining??
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Reply By: mikehzz - Monday, Jun 09, 2014 at 09:36

Monday, Jun 09, 2014 at 09:36
The protection of crocs started in the 70's because 95% of them had been killed by unregulated hunting. It is false to claim that the numbers now are unnaturally high. The numbers in the 70's were unnaturally low prompting intervention by the government. There will probably have to be some sort of control soon as we can't have crocs walking up the main street of coastal towns. Luckily most people don't see wholesale slaughter as the solution these days, but I have no problem with culling them close to major population centre's. Australia is a big place. For the most part, live and let live.
AnswerID: 534057

Reply By: Alloy c/t - Monday, Jun 09, 2014 at 09:59

Monday, Jun 09, 2014 at 09:59
We were camped at Towns River , a young couple there as well left their small tinny 1/2 in the water next to the boat ramp every evening after being out fishing during the day , on the 4th morning the young fella was greeted by a 3.5m saltie in his tinny waiting for breakfast …….
AnswerID: 534058

Follow Up By: Bigfish - Monday, Jun 09, 2014 at 10:11

Monday, Jun 09, 2014 at 10:11
Another example of repetition. Crocs are very smart and look for drinking /feeding patters at waters edge. Most animals (feral pigs, cows , wallabies) will use a worn track to drink at waters edge. The croc knows this and this is where he will ambush his prey. They don't come in my bath tub and I don't go in theirs!!!
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Reply By: Cole - Monday, Jun 09, 2014 at 22:46

Monday, Jun 09, 2014 at 22:46
Here here Big fish

Live & let live.

Crocs are wild creatures living in the wild. Lets respect that.

For those who see killing as the answer to anything I question the reasoning. I expect that it is fear based. To kill something that is defenceless against the rifle is merely a
fear based cowards response

If we truly value our own lives we should equally value the lives of other living beings.

Cole

AnswerID: 534103

Reply By: Emerging I.T. - Tuesday, Jun 10, 2014 at 16:53

Tuesday, Jun 10, 2014 at 16:53
Latest News on the attack and some interesting stats

Seems the NT croc population is around 130,000 vs 235,000 NT residents, local fishermen are taking arms for protection (Isn't that normal anyhow?) . It seems the crocs are moving into freshwater also which may change the swimming habits of many. Interesting read.
AnswerID: 534140

Follow Up By: Emerging I.T. - Tuesday, Jun 10, 2014 at 16:55

Tuesday, Jun 10, 2014 at 16:55
Link
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Follow Up By: Emerging I.T. - Tuesday, Jun 10, 2014 at 17:00

Tuesday, Jun 10, 2014 at 17:00
Seems there might be problems with the link

link

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FollowupID: 817696

Follow Up By: Ronnie R - Saturday, Jun 14, 2014 at 16:29

Saturday, Jun 14, 2014 at 16:29
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