tool/spares kit for the big trip?

Submitted: Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 08:27
ThreadID: 108616 Views:3780 Replies:14 FollowUps:26
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Hi all. I'm a new member and an absolute newbie to the 4x4 world. We've decided to sell up everything and do the big trip around our great land next year in a 200 Land cruiser GXL towing a camper trailer. My initial and most vexing question, the first of many I'm sure, is what tools and spares should I take on this trip? I have trawled this forum and a few others and have found lists a long as what our trip will be next year. Do I have to take everything or are there the essentials I should take?

I'm just worried about the space factor. I am planning on traveling some remote areas and tracks too.
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Reply By: MUZBRY- Life member(Vic) - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 08:41

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 08:41
Gday Craig
If you have a new car i don't think you will need much , maybe spare belts, maybe radiator hoses,a few nuts and bolts with spanners to fit,cable ties and 100mph tape, but there are some who will say you need to take enough to build another car if the first one breaks. Don't overload and take it easy.



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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 10:14

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 10:14
Hi Craig,

Generally I agree with Muzbry, but from your profile description I see it is a 2008 vehicle, not brand new. So I would definitely be doing some preventative maintenance before leaving. I think this far more important than carrying a whole workshop with you.

Have a good mechanic do a thorough inspection and carry out any needed maintenance. Belts and rubber hoses do age so replace them all as a precaution, including the heater hoses. You could carry the old ones as a back-up if you wish. Also carry some new hose clamps.... the old ones sometimes don't work too well. Fuel supplies can be contaminated from remote places so certainly carry a spare fuel filter. An air filter is not necessary as it can be adequately cleaned en route if need be.

Unless you are going into very remote locations alone, I consider there is no need to carry extensive spares. We do go rough & remote so do carry a few serious spares such as a wheel bearings and shockers but no matter how much you carry you could still be caught out by the failure of a component that you did not carry so where do you stop?

As for tools, well again you shouldn't need a complete workshop. After all you only need the tools that you are capable of using and to fit the spares that you are carrying. My whole toolkit fits within a canvas toolbag and comprises a range of screwdrivers, pliers, side cutters, 1/2 dozen each of open end and ring spanners, socket set with extensions, adjustable wrenches, locking pliers, hammer etc.

For electrical there is a multimeter, 12v test lamp, some cable, a range of connectors both crimp and screw, crimp tool, fuses and tapes. Then several tubes of silicon and epoxy putty. A range of cable ties are invaluable, especially larger ones. I do not carry spare lamps, failure of a lamp will not stop you.

As we do go rough & remote, I also carry a very comprehensive tyre repair kit and a spare tube apart from a complete second spare wheel. However a plug-type tyre repair kit will get you out of simple punctures. A good 12v air compressor is an absolute essential. Not only will you need it to reinflate a punctured tyre but also to adjust your tyre pressures to suit the varying terrains you will encounter. This is most important so swot up on it if you you do not already know.

One unusual thing carried is welding equipment operated from the 12v car batteries, and it has been needed when a radius control arm separated from the front axle housing! But I would't urge it on everyone.

Recovery gear needs to be considered also.Winches and all their accessories may be important in the High Country but not always useful in the Outback where there are no trees. Clumsy ground anchors are impractical and burying spare wheels as anchors is quite a task. MaxTrax or similar are easy to carry and pretty effective at getting you out of a bog. A snatch strap and the knowledge to use it are useful, but relies on a second vehicle. Be sure that you have a good jack that will fit and lift sufficiently...... try it out at home. A High Lift jack should not be necessary. They are heavy, clumsy and somewhat dangerous. And don't forget a long-handled shovel... not a little folding type. Oh, and a canvas rubbish bag on the rear spare to carry your rubbish out to a disposal point.


Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: oetkb - Saturday, Jul 12, 2014 at 17:23

Saturday, Jul 12, 2014 at 17:23
Exactly what Allan B said!. Its useless carrying spares you dont know how to fit and if you start carrying too many spares then you run the risk of overloading your vehicle. (Ive had clowns tell me I need to carry a spare rear leaf and shocker for my cruiser. No idea what they were on!) All my tools fit into a standard size tool box and fit in a spot I don't need to access regularly. The big thing is to practice using the stuff. Get a stuffed tyre, drill a hole in it then practice fixing it, if you only carry a case as a second spare then practice fitting it. You Tube make it look easy.
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Reply By: Athol W1 - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 09:05

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 09:05
Craig
As you are travelling in a reasonably new and renown to be reliable vehicle then the spares would only be such things as belts and hoses. I would certainly be carrying at least 1, possibly 2 fuel filters and have the knowledge to change them (you don't mention petrol or diesel) and I would also have a secondary fuel filter fitted before you go. It is just as common to get dirty fuel with a petrol as it is with diesel, it is only the cost of the damage that varies, but dirty petrol will still stop the vehicle at the most inconvenient time.

There are a lot of problems caused by the vehicle being overloaded because of all the spares and tools that are carried that are just being carried 'just in case', and at some point the spares will be required just to fix the problem that they caused.

When going bush I always carry the oil & filters for my next service, plus 2 of each of my fuel filters. In an emergency you can use engine oil as a substitute in the diffs (LS90 starts life as a sae30 oil, its the additive that make it thick, and engine oil has to withstand greater shear pressure in the camshaft and follower area).

If your LC200 is an early version TTD (you do not indicate its age) then it may be prudent to replace the water pump before you adventure too far into remote areas, as there appears to be an issue with them, check out www.lcool.org for further information, you do have to join but it is free.

I would also recommend the fitment of an additional transmission oil cooler as it is very easy to overheat the transmission when towing, and it can be done just by working the engine hard in soft sand, always remember that you can not freeze transmission oil and for every 10 degrees that you reduce the transmission operating temp you double its life. I would also recommend the fitment of a Scangauge 11 so that you can know what is going on with your car (further information on Scangauge can be found at www.ampleoutdoors.com.au just a happy customer, no association)

Enjoy your travels
regards
Athol
60th anniversary LC TTD200
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Follow Up By: mick v1 - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 09:30

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 09:30
fuel filters are a must, belts hoses and some pre packed bearings for the camper just in case, work the rest out as you go around
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Reply By: Phil B (WA) - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 10:29

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 10:29
Hi Craig
In part you said
"...I am planning on traveling some remote areas and tracks too...."

Take a quality tyre plug kit, a multimeter and some spare electrical cable and fuses. After market accessories and cabling can play up on corros etc.
Cable ties, duct tape etc have already been covered.
There is a lot of difference between
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Follow Up By: Member - Frank P (NSW) - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 12:41

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 12:41
If you choose to carry some electrical cable, a few terminals of various sizes and types and crimping pliers - the cheap ones will be good enough to get you home.

I have found a small gas soldering iron and solder and heat-shrink of various sizes to be invaluable.

Self-amalgamating tape (Rescue Tape) has many purposes - electrical, hose repair etc.

Cheers
FrankP

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Reply By: Bob Y. - Qld - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 11:23

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 11:23
Craig,

Check out threads by member OzBadDude (105051 & 106904) He was asking almost the same question as yourself, and has the same vehicle.

As your 200 is 6 years old, and has maybe 110K - 150K clicks on it, may I suggest you get the king pin bearings replaced, and the wheel bearings repacked and adjusted. With everyone's suggestions provided above you should be right. Don't forget some "Mechanic-in-a-can" and some teflon spray, dry lube I think it's called.

Windscreen cleaner and a couple of soft rags are good when the insects, or grasshoppers are bad.

Enjoy the trip,

Bob

Seen it all, Done it all.
Can't remember most of it.

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Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 20:02

Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 20:02
Gday Bob,
Hope all is well in your neck of the woods.
Unfortunately, such is progress, but the 200series doesn't have king pin bearings and the wheel bearings are totally sealed, and unservicable! Good news is that wheel bearing failures are virtually unheard of. Its one of the reasons I made to move to own one - I was sick and tired of servicing wheel bearings.

The fuel filters are cheap and easy to replace - just need a hex key!
The "belts" that are mentioned above is a single serpentine belt with a self adjuster, again, never heard of one failing.
Hoses seem to last forever these days too.
There are a few known weak points - the CV joints can break if you lift the front suspension the full 50mm and drive it hard. The early models can crack the power steering banjo on the rack. Later models had a stronger part. Water pumps can leak in normal time - say around 120k plus, but not worth carrying a spare. Alternators can fail from dirt water immersion - on older vehicles a spare might be useful, or at least a strategy for dealing with it.

Cheers
phil
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Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 21:36

Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 21:36
Can't complain up here, Phil. Life's good, hope all well with you too.

Thanks for the update too, Phil. Looks like I need to get out more :-) Or go onto LCool more often?

No king pins and sealed bearings would be the go. Have often thought many wheel bearing failures can be put down to the fact that most of us don't like to get our hands THAT dirty, certainly not every 40K clicks.

Found this 40 something year old slide recently, of king pin/wheel bearing maintenance on "Newry" Station(on Keep River NT). The late Les Scott & Paddy doing the job. and the brakes on those old FJ's!!! Check out the old Roadtrak Major tyre, or is it an Olympic lookalike?



Have been working on the electrics of our camper over the past weeks(similar to your old one), and leaving the bearings for later :-)

Thanks Phil,
Bob.
Seen it all, Done it all.
Can't remember most of it.

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Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 22:09

Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 22:09
Nice photo Bob, I can relate to that :-)
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Reply By: Sigmund - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 13:50

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 13:50
Epoxy putty can repair a radiator. That silicone self amalgamating tape will save you some hoses - anyway there's no point in taking the hoses that you can't get to in the bush.

Matching your camper and tug wheels saves on spares. If you search patiently you will find someone who's swapping 4 or 5 wheels for a different size and selling the old ones cheap.

Some useful sources covering a lot of ground: R Pepper 4WD Handbook. Boiling Billy Press.
http://www.outbacktravelaustralia.com.au/
AnswerID: 535530

Reply By: Sigmund - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 13:53

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 13:53
Winches in the dunes: the Pajero folk tested the lan-cor anchor and gave it the thumbs up.
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Reply By: Bazooka - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 13:57

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 13:57
Just out of interest has anyone ever used their spare radiator/heater hoses? After carrying spares for 20 years I wouldn't bother now.

spark plugs;
fuel and air filters;
belts;
cable ties and metal clamps;
oil;
spare headlight globe;
duct/gaffer/rescue tape (anyone see the episode of Mythbusters about duct tape?);
wheel nuts;
tyre repair kit (+- a tube);
air compressor;
fuses;
misc grease;
WD40;
loctite;
shovel;
snatch strap;
tools;
saw;
first aid kit;
rags/plastic sheet;
extinguisher;
comms!
AnswerID: 535533

Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 20:59

Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 20:59
Agree about the hoses - last hose I split was on a VC Commodore 35 years ago. I carry a piece of spare heater hose because it can serve a lot of purposes. And a length of fuel hose.

He might have problems finding the spark plugs on his TTD :-)
I also carry a few spare wheel studs as well as wheel nuts.
I've stopped carrying a tube - if a tyre can't be repaired with a plug or a patch, then its no good anyway. Carry 2 spares, then there's no issue. Flat tyres are less common these days.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 08:24

Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 08:24
Hoses are simple components but can fail unexpectedly.
As said, I change mine routinely but carry spares as well. Last change was just before last year's trip. Only one week back home and found coolant on the garage floor from a split top hose.
Sure, maybe you can patch them out bush but a pair are easy to carry.

When did you last replace a wheel stud Phil? Serious question mate. I'm thinking about it.
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 21:20

Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 21:20
Gday Allan,
Never had to personally replace a 14mm Stud on the 5 stud cruisers, we heard of others who have. Very uncommon though. Maybe they had aftermarket wheels, wheel spacers, loose nuts, overloaded etc etc
Certainly more common with the 12mm ones on the 6 stud cruisers and Patrols.
They are a cheap part that occupies very little space, so I carry them.

As far as hoses go, I am amazed at how good the genuine hoses look after 10-15 years. Better coolants and maybe better rubber? Out of interest, the one that split - was it a genuine Toyota hose? The genuine heater hoses can be very hard to track down - a few years back I tried to get a set for my daughters 1997 HZJ80 and there was one hose in particular that was unobtainable. So we checked the condition which was fine, kept the originals and she carries a length as a spare.

Cheers
Phil
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 22:07

Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 22:07
Thanks Phil, It could be difficult to proceed with several broken studs and fence wire really wouldn't cut it! I lube mine with anti-seize and tighten to spec with a torque wrench, so feel confident but maybe a couple of spares would not go astray.

My split hose was not genuine Toyota so maybe there is a lesson. My replacements are very soft and "rubbery" (LOL) but not silicon. I'll be keeping a close watch on them.
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Wednesday, Jul 09, 2014 at 23:00

Wednesday, Jul 09, 2014 at 23:00
Allan, if you're registered on Lcool, an interesting thread came up yesterday. A number of people who have busted all 5 studs on 70series when using aftermarket wheels.
http://www.lcool.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=35159&highlight=&sid=f732a0ffad045564661c3d663b300330
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Wednesday, Jul 09, 2014 at 23:19

Wednesday, Jul 09, 2014 at 23:19
Thanks Phil, I'll take a look.

Are you and I the only ones not on the "Grey Nomad" thread? LOL
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Member - Scott M (NSW) - Thursday, Jul 10, 2014 at 11:34

Thursday, Jul 10, 2014 at 11:34
I've avoided it as well .... turning into a mortar attack...

Make a light hearted comment about bikkie-dippers and watch out !!
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Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Thursday, Jul 10, 2014 at 19:16

Thursday, Jul 10, 2014 at 19:16
Allan and Scott,
Just had a squizz at the grey nomad thread....3440 views....but its nice to see the forum lighten up a bit - some funny posts there! With Exploroz now, I check the number of views and of its above 1000, then the thread is worth looking at! But on that thread, I felt the need to comment about grey nomads and generators and how noisy and inconsiderate they are - my aim would be to push the views past the 4000 mark :-)
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Reply By: Tony F8 - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 14:46

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 14:46
I would just like to add a Gregory's manual or similar for your model vehicle, you may not be that mechanically minded, but the next person who comes along might be, and between the two of you, you should be able to fix most items that require it. A small selection of 12mm and 14mm bolts and nuts will come in handy, they are about the only sizes used on toyo's. Your local wrecker will sell you a box full of nuts and bolts for bugger all, just clean em up and pick put what you need.
Cheers.
Tony F8.
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Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 20:51

Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 20:51
Gregorys/Haynes etc don't have a 200series workshop manual. Easiest solution is a factory workshop manual DVD on Ebay. Can also access the factory manual online HERE.

Can also pull spare bolts/nuts from another less critical part of the vehicle if needed. But I carry a spare sump plug, diff plug as well as a few M6, M8, M10x1.25, M12x1.25 as these are the usual Toyota sizes. Bits of threaded rod are also handy. As is fencing wire!
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Reply By: Mudguard - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 15:04

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 15:04
Hi Graig,

Sorry to be blunt here,

You can carry all the spares you think you need/ want, But do YOU know how use them have YOU serviced your vehicle before, changed wheel bearings, shockers, fault found a air leak in a fuel system, bled a brake system ??? If not get you're self a genuine service manual and start doing some homework. Its where you find out that heck I need a special Toyota upside down left handed thingybob to undo that piece of kit.
Join or participate in a 4wd course get to KNOW your equipment = peace of mind=safety=good trip

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Follow Up By: Member - Scott M (NSW) - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 18:52

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 18:52
Mudguard - agree - I take a set of spare wheel bearings and hub kit with me on remote trips (useful as the 40 hubs & bearings are interchangeable) - however the whole lot is useless unless you have this..
learnt from bitter expereince.


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Follow Up By: Off-track - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 21:49

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 21:49
Or you can use a common (flat) screwdriver, as I had to once. Spanner more suitable though of course.
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Follow Up By: Member - Scott M (NSW) - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 23:05

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 23:05
Off-track - yeah - you can use a screwdriver and a FBH, but it makes a mess of the locking nut and other bits in there...
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Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 20:34

Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 20:34
Guys,
The original poster has a 200series - wheel bearings are sealed for life, your 54mm tool is useless, why can't this forum stay on topic??????
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Follow Up By: Member - Scott M (NSW) - Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 00:28

Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 00:28
Phil, the response was Mudguards post about having the experience of maintaining your vehicle and knowing what tools and spares are necessary. Who appointed you moderator?

If we're sticking to 200 series, then would you suggest taking the diagnostic firmware or software to reset any sensor errors?
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Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 07:36

Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 07:36
Scott, my post was directed to you both.

I feel sorry for Craig who posted the original question. He asks a simple question about spares for his 200series and campertrailer and gets a heap of irrelevant responses that he will have to try to figure out himself.
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Reply By: Batt's - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 15:45

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 15:45
Don't take this the wrong way but some people like working on cars and some have no interest at all that's just how it is so if your not mechanically minded don't waste your time taking a bunch of tools with you if you don't know how to fix any problems you could create a bigger problem. If your determined that you still need to take something do a basic mechanical course so you are not standing around scratching your head with your new tools in hand and no idea how to use them. If your travelling with other people ask if they have any basic mechanical knowledge most times someone does. As long as you know how to change a tyre and where the jack and wheel brace are kept and how to get to the spare I would seriously practice changing a wheel at home before you leave town on the car and the trailer because you may need some pieces of timber to help change the trailer wheel if the jack is not tall enough better finding out at home first. And if you have a diesel make sure your mechanic does replace the fuel and air filters at regular service intervals because that's about the only thing you need to worry about just enjoy the trip.
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Follow Up By: Batt's - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 15:46

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 15:46
Oh and don't forget the hammer and tent pegs if you have an awning to put up
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Reply By: Member - Craig - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 20:21

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 20:21
A big thanks to all for the constructive feedback. The cruiser is in pretty good knick, for a 2008 model it only has 57500 on the clock. It was just being used for a school run! So, I'll give it a thorough once over before we leave and take a few spares for good measure.

AnswerID: 535560

Follow Up By: Mudguard - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 20:55

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 20:55
An 08 model just used on SCHOOL RUNS! That's going to carboned up like heck You'd also better start doing some hard driving runs as well.
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Reply By: Member - Beatit (QLD) - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 20:55

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 20:55
Gday Craig,

Coming in a little late, but as they say better late hey. Just prior to a previous trip I had a mechanic go over my car and had him replace the belts. What came out of that experience for me was that there was a tensioner nut just out of direct view but accessible with a uni socket from snap on. Now my reason for mentioning this is that I have always taken spare belts as basic spares and the irony was that without that simple socket it would have been a massive task to replace that belt roadside. So, if at all possible, know if you need any special tools for some of those seemingly easy jobs.

Kind regards
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Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 20:41

Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 20:41
200series TTD has a sepentine belt with tensioner - tensioner needs simple 14mm socket to un-tension it. Never heard of anyone doing a serpentine belt with these, but water pumps can develop slow leaks.
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Reply By: Off-track - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 21:52

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 21:52
If you believe anything that comes from 'Mr 4x4' you will also need to take a full replacement set of shock absorbers.

Possibly on the toughest of trips I might take 2 but otherwise this is way overkill.
AnswerID: 535565

Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 20:38

Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 20:38
Ever tried to replace a front strut on a 200series? Almost impossible to do in the field.

Rear shocks yes - worth carrying as spares - just the usual live axle.
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Reply By: cookie1 - Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 22:33

Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 22:33
I've done a few large trips with the 200GX (they are awesome vehicles) and the critical thing is to have it serviced before you go and make sure they change the Air & Fuel Filters. I also carry a spare Fuel & Air filter as we have had the warning light come on on the last 3 trips, make sure you take the hex key.

Apart from that a set of tyrepliers and a couple of tubes of tyre cement - Rema Tip Top and bloody good tyres, I use Mickey Thompson ATZ 4 Rib, but whatever make sure their LT construction and make sure your tyre pressures are right for the conditions.

I have a socket set, spanners, screwdrivers and a gas soldering iron, even if you don't know how to use them someone else may well be able to help you.

Don't take excess spares, I did that when I first started out but have gradually worked out that they just took up space and loaded up the vehicle.

My best tool is the HF Radio subscribed to VKS737

cheers
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