Battle of an influx of tresspassers onto Pastoral Stations

Submitted: Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 20:59
ThreadID: 108637 Views:2187 Replies:7 FollowUps:14
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Perhaps a timely reminder for us all to show some (more) respect ....
I do note they expect it to get worse in the future so they may not be very friendly to those of us that have a genuine reason to access their lease...
Pastoral stations in remote Western Australia battle an influx of trespassing tourists.
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Reply By: Member - KBAD - Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 21:30

Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 21:30
Was always a problem on my families properties confusion by the general populace about what a Pastoral or Perpetual Lease actually meant. Many saw it as it being only a lease so therefore right of entry existed which it does not, simple way to avoid confusion contact the owner and seek permission.
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Reply By: cookie1 - Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 22:14

Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 22:14
We just came back from the Kimberley and saw a lot of roads heading off onto stations along the Western coast, but as tempting as it is, unless it is a gazetted road, consider it private property.

I guess it would be classed as trespassing and you could be charged as such if they really got fed up with it.

cheers
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Follow Up By: Member - Joe n Mel n kids (FNQ - Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 22:24

Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 22:24
True, I guess we need to look at it as if it was our yard and we had no front fence, we would not be to happy if someone pulled up on our front lawn and rolled out a swag eh ........
The same goes for what we know as "Aboriginal Land", it really does not have fences or even roads or gates but it does have a distinct boundary/s and when travelling in remote areas we need to research our trips very carefully if planning to camp as we may be camping on land that we don't have permission to and it often leads to the land being "locked" up, they don't tend to say much or complain a lot but they do notice and it pees them off a lot when they find a heap of people camping in areas that they hold as there own, they then follow it up in the way of "bans" or "fees" and we suffer in the long run, not hard to seek permission and if they do say no, respect it as it is only because of others before us that abused the privilege ....
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Follow Up By: cookie1 - Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 22:41

Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 22:41
Case in point would be Bollard Lagoon Station which has closed the Southern section due to people not doing the right thing leaving their station staff to do clean up work instead of tending to the livestock, fences etc.

We went down Boggy Hole a couple of years ago and saw used nappies and adult faeces with paper strewn near the water. Now this is a station with livestock, now if the livestock started to get sick then they would have to close the track going through there too, and you can't blame them.

We have had to pull up after a long day and camp but we do stay away from travelling deep onto their property, I believe there is an allowance for up to 50m unfenced but stand to be corrected. The important thing is that we leave no trace of us being there.

cheers

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Follow Up By: Member - Ups and Downs - Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 08:17

Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 08:17
'True, I guess we need to look at it as if it was our yard and we had no front fence, we would not be to happy if someone pulled up on our front lawn and rolled out a swag eh ........'

This is how I think of the boat people. Same thing except someone trespassing on Station property isn't entitled to get money, food and a tent given to them!
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Follow Up By: John and Regina M - Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 16:45

Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 16:45
Ups and downs....
Poor form mate.
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Follow Up By: Bazooka - Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 22:33

Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 22:33
Yep. Some people have great difficulty putting themselves into others' shoes. Complex issue, not helped by such attitudes.
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Reply By: Motherhen - Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 23:46

Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 23:46
Pastoral Stations are like rented houses - you can't march into anyone's home just because you know it is owned by the State Housing authority.

It is not easy to ask. While some stations have the station name, and now a few have No Camping signs, on their boundary fence grids, I am sure there are others that would not mind if asked. When travelling through the stations, not many have their name shown so you don't know which station you are on, or how to contact them. We have seen two or three with their UHF number on the fence so you may get hold of the pastoralists by UHF. They may not welcome the intrusion of you driving up to the homestead to ask - IF you can find the homestead. All station tracks look alike. Hence if needing to stop for the night, and we will not drive through unfenced station at night particularly if towing, it is simpler to camp within the thirty metre road reserve - although we don't get out the tape measure.

Some years ago travelling through the Murchison, I was horrified and disgusted to see the rubbish left at where someone must have camped alongside a tank and livestock water trough. A heap of 'disposal' nappies, and cans which of course had not burnt away in their campfire. This was seen as it was close to the road.

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Reply By: Peter_n_Margaret - Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 03:05

Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 03:05
I believe that in South Australia there is a right of entry for the public onto pastoral land.
Permission must be first sought and obtained from the lease holder, but if the lease holder continually refuses without 'good reason' then an appeal to the pastoral board is in order.

Cheers,
Peter
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AnswerID: 535638

Follow Up By: Bigfish - Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 05:38

Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 05:38
If he cited continual rubbish removal and dirty nappies constantly seen then he will win hands down every time. In my opinion I wouldn't particularly want to go onto a property whereby I had obtained permission after a challenge to the pastoral board. Too many city slickers travelling out bush thinking its their god given right to go where they want and that no one will care if they camp where they want.
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 07:32

Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 07:32
Hi Peter

What you have just posted is 100% correct and there are not too many people that know your rights.

The key in the first instance is to get to know the station people first hand and it will be you key to returned access to many great and remote areas.

This is the case with me and I have a large network of contacts and in fact will be travelling through a number of remote Station tracks very soon, all will the stations approval.

The great point also is to leave no trace of your visit, except the tracks that are left by the vehicle you are driving.

One of my contacts in the Birdsville area has been caught out before and now requests the registration number of all vehicles travelling through his station.

The key is to respect the land that you are travelling through and treat it as if it was your own back yard.



Cheers




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Follow Up By: Slow one - Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 12:11

Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 12:11
Stephen,
just to add to your reply. With the large increase of outback tourist traffic, stations have to maintain their tracks which costs time and money. Some they may give a touch up before moving stock but mostly they will try not to touch the tracks unless repairing from rain damage.

I know if I was a station owner I wouldn't want to be repairing tracks damaged by others.

Guess they could lock the gates and say you have access as long as you walk.
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Follow Up By: Tjukayirla Roadhouse - Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 12:19

Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 12:19
if permission was refused, why would you continue to bug them? they obviously don't want you there, so move on and forget it.
I wonder how people would feel if Pastoralists started lobbing on your front lawn?
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 14:23

Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 14:23
Hi Guys

Just liketo point out that I always do the right thing, and know first hand what goes on on some station tracks where visitors are not welcome.

Do the right thing in the first place, and a phone call always get me back there.

As for locked gates, we go where itis very remote station country, that most people would never know how to get there and what to see......likeI said, it always comes down to just who you know.




Cheers



Stephen
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Follow Up By: Slow one - Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 19:54

Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 19:54
Stephen,
I hope you didn't take offence at what I posted. I realise you do the right thing and was just pointing out what the cost to the grazier can be.

I am afraid many don't do the right thing which creates problems for all.

Just as a side thing about people who don't do the right thing, here is an example. We have stayed in the Alice for a week to see my brother and the van park we are at has just allowed dogs in recently. 2nd day both my wife and myself stepped in dog bleep (this was in my stepping out thongs) and there was more crap around the next day. The genuine good pet owners will suffer from the few that wonder why parks refuse dogs.
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 21:55

Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 21:55
Hi slow one

No offence taken at all, as I know just where you are coming from.

You only just have to take a drive through the Simson Desert to see how people treat this special area.

That is why we like to venture where we do, well away from the more popular visited areas and knowing that you will not see another vehicle.


Cheers



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Reply By: Joe G2 - Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 07:14

Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 07:14
Having lived and worked most of my life in remote areas of WA and the NT I can say that 99% of any camps that have nappies and beer cans left behind will be from locals passing through not tourists traveling. Please note I did say 99% as there will always be some tourists who do not do the right thing.
AnswerID: 535642

Follow Up By: cookie1 - Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 12:52

Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 12:52
Mmmm, agree and dsagree

when we travelled through Jigalong on the way to the Talawana there was an area near a creek that I would definitely agree on as it is too far out of the way for the tye of rubbish there.

When we stopped out Running Water on the Boggy Hole road there was a 100 series cruiser with a baby on-board heading from where we had been - they were not locals.

If it is locals then I reckon the station owners would be onto them pretty quick given it would be a regular thing, us tourists / visitors have a respoinsibility to ensure that our activities do not disrupt their livelihood.

cheers
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Reply By: Alan S (WA) - Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 14:18

Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 14:18
Joe

There are two issues that consider to confuse the issue,

1) There is a conceived idea that because land in WA can be subject to multiple uses, i.e Pastoral lease, mineral exploration or mining, that therefore if you are not inconflict with any of the current specified use you can enter the land. Another way of this view is that they consider that pastoral lease only gives rights of pastoral activities, and therefore being state owned land access is allowed as long as no competing activities are undertaken.

2) Normally water courses cant be owned, therefore they cannot be lease. So for example a lease that extends on both sides of a major river. There is a view that as the river is not leased property therefore access to the water cannot be prevented.

These are not my views but views gained from talking to others and from other forums.

I am interested in what the real situation actually is.

Alan
AnswerID: 535672

Reply By: Knothome - Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 14:31

Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 14:31
Is it a fact or not they don't have control below the high water mark / highest high tide mark and also cant stop access. I remember they couldn't stop professional fishermen as they tried many years ago and couldn't stop my old man who was a pro fisherman.
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Follow Up By: CSeaJay - Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 17:12

Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 17:12
Yeah the Salties have control below the high water mark...
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