help with tire age

Submitted: Saturday, Jul 19, 2014 at 14:53
ThreadID: 108803 Views:1766 Replies:7 FollowUps:8
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Ok we have just got a 2nd hand car Ford BA I have replaced the front tires and I have a slow leak on the rear and what I want to do is put the spare on to the Aloy rim it has much more tread and seems a much better tire so how old is it as it came with the car so I have no idea of its age it is a Good year eagal NC15

repair the leak and use that as a spare till later on I can purchase new tires

here is a image of the DOT number which I am trying to understand how to read it



thank you
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Reply By: Member -Ted (Vic) - Saturday, Jul 19, 2014 at 15:17

Saturday, Jul 19, 2014 at 15:17
It is the 4 digit code showing the week and the year of manufacture, looks like week 17 of 2005.
Hope this helps

Cheers
AnswerID: 536292

Follow Up By: allein m - Saturday, Jul 19, 2014 at 15:23

Saturday, Jul 19, 2014 at 15:23
good thank you


is that ok to use a tire of that age it is brand new and unused

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FollowupID: 820365

Reply By: Bushranger1 - Saturday, Jul 19, 2014 at 15:22

Saturday, Jul 19, 2014 at 15:22
G'day Allein,
I think the 1705 means it was made on the 17th week of 2005?

I was in one of the tyre places a few weeks ago & I asked about using the brand new 14 yr old tyre in the boot of my daughters car & he reckoned it was fine to use it.
When I said that I thought it was unsafe to use being that age his exact words were "that's just a myth in order to sell you a new tyre".

He did say this only applies to tyres that have spent their life in the dark area of a car boot & not when they are kept in the sunshine on the rear wheel carrier of a 4wd.

Cheers
Stu
AnswerID: 536294

Follow Up By: allein m - Saturday, Jul 19, 2014 at 15:26

Saturday, Jul 19, 2014 at 15:26
He did say this only applies to tyres that have spent their life in the dark area of a car boot

I would have thought out if the sun it would be on


On the roof in in full sun would do more damage

so it has been in the boot all this time out of sight so from what you are saying it is a No do not use ?

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FollowupID: 820366

Follow Up By: Bushranger1 - Saturday, Jul 19, 2014 at 17:14

Saturday, Jul 19, 2014 at 17:14
He said it would be fine to use if it was in the boot so I put it on the car & bought 3 new tyres & used the spare to make 4.

It was a 14 year old tyre. If were on the roof or on a rear wheel carrier in the sun I would not have used it.
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FollowupID: 820369

Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Saturday, Jul 19, 2014 at 17:39

Saturday, Jul 19, 2014 at 17:39
As they get older they do get harder so whilst they may be safe for use the harder rubber will not have as much grip as a new or softer compound tyre by comparison
I bought a second hand car for my son and it had tyres that were of reputable brand and still had about 50% tread left but 10 years old. They seemed ok in the dry but a bit too skatey in the wet so replaced them
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FollowupID: 820372

Follow Up By: John and Regina M - Saturday, Jul 19, 2014 at 17:53

Saturday, Jul 19, 2014 at 17:53
I understand it.
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FollowupID: 820376

Reply By: Batt's - Saturday, Jul 19, 2014 at 17:22

Saturday, Jul 19, 2014 at 17:22
Could you put a tube in it and still be able to use it if it's not showing signs of cracking etc.
AnswerID: 536296

Follow Up By: Bushranger1 - Saturday, Jul 19, 2014 at 17:33

Saturday, Jul 19, 2014 at 17:33
Probably a bad idea if the tyre carcass is cracking.
A tube won't add any strength to a damaged tyre & putting a tube in a tubeless tyre casing usually results in a blow out due to the rough inner surface of the tyre casing rubbing through the tube.
You then get rapid deflation as the air quickly escapes through the hole in the rim where the valve exits.
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FollowupID: 820370

Follow Up By: Bushranger1 - Saturday, Jul 19, 2014 at 17:35

Saturday, Jul 19, 2014 at 17:35
Sorry I misread the fact you said if the casing was NOT cracking.
Still not recommended though due to the other reason.
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FollowupID: 820371

Reply By: Bigfish - Saturday, Jul 19, 2014 at 17:35

Saturday, Jul 19, 2014 at 17:35
17th week of 2005. 9 year old tyre...ditch it. The rubber will have lost its elasticity, therefore grip and flexibility gone. Tyres are cheap. A spare tyre when used should be of good quality like those on your car. I recently good rid of 3 tyres on a trailer that were made in 2005 as well. 13 inch and on a 4 stud rim. When I dropped one on its tread from about 2 feet....it did everything but bounce back up!!!Dull thud, air pressure good, but was well out of its use by date. I can remember reading somewhere that 5 years is about the time frame for tyres. True or not...its not only your life and vehicle but other road users as well.
AnswerID: 536297

Reply By: pepper2 - Saturday, Jul 19, 2014 at 20:58

Saturday, Jul 19, 2014 at 20:58
Tyre is correct in Australia
AnswerID: 536306

Follow Up By: Member - Bill13 - Sunday, Jul 20, 2014 at 19:59

Sunday, Jul 20, 2014 at 19:59
Thanks Pepper2.
You beat me to it.
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FollowupID: 820424

Reply By: 671 - Sunday, Jul 20, 2014 at 21:35

Sunday, Jul 20, 2014 at 21:35
allein m

Look up "rubber oxidation" on the net and you will get some idea of what the problem is. There is a brief overview of it on the bottom of this page an it looks like you can see a lot more on it if you are a member of the site. http://pubs.acs.org/doi/pdf/10.1021/ie50196a011

That is just one small part of a lot more information you can look up on the subject.

I noticed Collyn Rivershttp://www.caravanandmotorhomebooks.com/about_the_author.html said recently on the caravaner's forum that, " Many tyre companies suggest that five years is the realistic maximum life for a used tyre and about seven for one that is in regular use."

I have heard the same thing said in recent years on everything from TV programs to net forums as more people become aware of it.

Just out of interest, I saw a Falcon blow a rear tyre about 50 metres in front of me on a Sydney freeway at around 110 kph a couple of years ago. The car swung violently sideways with bits of rubber flying everywhere. The driver did an outstanding job of bringing it back under control. He must have had the driving skills of Brockie.

It is not worth taking a risk with old tyres. They maybe fine for around town driving at suburban speeds but not out on the highways or freeways with full loads on hot days at the speeds you are likely to be doing in a Falcon.
AnswerID: 536346

Reply By: allein m - Tuesday, Jul 22, 2014 at 16:36

Tuesday, Jul 22, 2014 at 16:36
Ok thanks for your help I have replaced the rear tyres with 2 brand new supercats and the left hand rear which has 50% tread and no leaks made 2011 is the new spare

The right hand one that was the problem with the slow leak had two nails in it so it really was not worth $50 to get fixed because of very little tread and poor condition.

so the original spare which is too old was also put in the bin

So I hope hoping to use the spare but not safe to do so and I feel a lot safer with two brand new tyres that were correctly fitted
AnswerID: 536420

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