Domestic dispute 1:

Submitted: Sunday, Jul 20, 2014 at 19:52
ThreadID: 108814 Views:2413 Replies:12 FollowUps:18
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Hi everyone!
Peter and Katrina from Tassie here.
Next July we will travel up to Cape York, then spend 7 months zigzagging our way back down the eastern half of the big island.
We can't agree as to whether or not it is worthwhile carrying our kayaks for this trip? Opportunities to use them versus time, versus space and weight?
Any feedback (preferably supporting the wife's argument lol) is appreciated
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Reply By: Member - bbuzz (NSW) - Sunday, Jul 20, 2014 at 20:14

Sunday, Jul 20, 2014 at 20:14
Need to know details of the wife's argument......
Bill B

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Follow Up By: Tas-tourers - Sunday, Jul 20, 2014 at 20:28

Sunday, Jul 20, 2014 at 20:28
very smart man!
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Reply By: Sand Man (SA) - Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 07:13

Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 07:13
OK, I'll jump in.

Over a seven month period, I would be leaving them at home.
Plenty of other activities to entertain you guys without the hassle of lugging them around.

Less frustration in setting up and breaking camp and more opportunity to spend time, chilling out!

Bill


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Follow Up By: Tas-tourers - Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 13:23

Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 13:23
Ah! I've heard that side of the story before...oh yeah from my hubby! Lol
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Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 18:45

Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 18:45
Katrina,

Listen to your husband, for he is a very wise man:-)

Honestly though, the hassle of carrying two kayaks everywhere you go for 7 months, versus the times you would actually use them, should speak for itself. For instance, you wouldn't be using them in the far north (in crocodile country) would you?

When traveling for the length of time you guys are planning, you will need every available space and even though I am unaware on the type of mobile accommodation you are taking with you, I would guess rooftop space could be better utilized?


Bill


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Follow Up By: Steve - Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 19:39

Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 19:39
inclined to go along with Sandman here but.....it depends on how much use you would get out of them. As a long-time sea kayaker, I often agonize over this very thing and although we're short of a bit of detail from you here, I wouldn't be paddling around the croc-infested Cape but would be more inclined to have a go on the open sea a bit further south - and even there you are a bit more exposed to the nasties that we have further south so you can end up not taking them out as much as you think. Depends on your type of paddling - we used to paddle all over the Whitsundays in winter when there's far less/no danger of crocs etc. On top of that, you'll be flogging across the inland parts of the country when you'll never use them too. Always a dilemma for us paddlers this one. I might add though, depends on the shape (mine are sea kayaks and pretty sleek) but they are more aerodynamic and not as wind resistant as a lot of stuff people put on their roof racks. You can always hire them although again, they are always "sit-on-tops" which isn't really the same as sea kayaking in a closed in boat. Depends on your type of paddling.
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Reply By: AlbyNSW - Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 08:31

Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 08:31
How about a bit of middle ground and getting a couple of inflatable kayaks
Much less hassle to be dragging around can still get out on the water if you want

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Follow Up By: Tas-tourers - Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 13:25

Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 13:25
Hi! Thought bout that but we both live off good pasture down here, not sure how long it will keep us afloat lol.
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Reply By: Les PK Ranger - Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 08:49

Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 08:49
Depends :)

Kayaking is a LOT of fun around the coast up there, especially as you get north of say TOC and the weather gets warmer.
If you're a bit of a fisher, they allow you to get to some nice spots too.

Only you know if your roof racks are clear enough to take them, and if the wind resistance is worth a bit extra fuel.

I think it's your regular kayaks, rather than inflatables, as why buy more stuff, and time to inflate is wasted time (you just wouldn't bother using them as much as you would dragging them off the roof).

So which of you is pro and which against ?

If you like paddling in Tassie, you'll kick yourself when you see some of the beaches and coves up north, and don't have the boats.
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Follow Up By: Tas-tourers - Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 13:26

Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 13:26
Thanks! I agree, and water temperatures will definitely be warmer than Tassies no matter where we go.
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Follow Up By: Les PK Ranger - Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 13:32

Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 13:32
No worries Tas.

Just a thought, you may want to leave them somewhere in Cairns if possible, and pick up on the return leg.

I'm just not sure if my first trip to the tip I'd be willing to paddle in any waterways further north anyway.
Even around Townsville through to Cairns you'd be best asking before paddling beaches or waterways.

Just something about being a possible menu item that puts me off taking too much risk up there :/

Others might have advice on that.
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Reply By: Bob Y. - Qld - Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 09:55

Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 09:55
Katrina,

What's the consequences for Peter if he wins the dispute? :-)

If you've got 7 months to spare, then I'd take the kayaks. There's plenty of waterholes, and some dams (Lake Moondarra & Lake Julius near Mt Isa & Chinaman Dam @ Cloncurry) out west, as well as Fairbairn?? Dam @ Emerald. Thomson River @ Longreach, as well as numerous 'holes on Barcoo River.

Plenty of other dams along the east coast as well. Don't know whether I'd be too keen to go paddling anywhere north of Cairns though :-)

Do see a lot of travellers heading north, to Darwin etc, with kayaks on roof bars. They must be planning to use them somewhere?

Sounds like it will be a magic holiday.............once the domestic is over.

Bob

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Can't remember most of it.

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Follow Up By: Tas-tourers - Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 13:36

Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 13:36
Peter wins the chance to unload the kayaks off our Cub spacevan when setting up camp...lol.
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Follow Up By: deserter - Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 17:18

Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 17:18
Plenty of crocs well south of Cairns too. Right down to Maryborough.
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Follow Up By: Les PK Ranger - Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 17:32

Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 17:32
That's what I thinking about deserter . . . best to ask locals and use caution, even down fairly central QLD.

Oh heck, they're going on the Cub ?
Oh yeah, not sure I'd be keen to take em off each night and reload each day either, for a whole seven months !! :*

Maybe they can be put on top of the vehicle instead ?
Besides, getting eaten by a prehistoric like creature MUST be starting to pray on your mind just a little by now ??? :D :)
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Follow Up By: Tas-tourers - Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 20:04

Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 20:04
We will be staying clear of snapping handbags as much as possible.
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Reply By: ExplorOz Team - Michelle - Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 12:22

Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 12:22
Since you're not attempting a goal such as a complete circumnavigation, then presumably during that 7 months you have the luxury of a little time to spend enjoying your leisure pastimes when you find suitable spots. You've got to get away from the vehicle and the road to really "feel" your freedom, so if you have the means to kayak, then the decision is easy - take them! And how lovely that you both can do this together. You'll have the trip of a lifetime I'm sure.
Michelle Martin
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Follow Up By: Tas-tourers - Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 13:38

Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 13:38
Finally...a like minded traveller. Us girls have to stick together lol
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Reply By: Bazooka - Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 13:44

Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 13:44
There will undoubtedly be times when you regret not having them K&P but there's one aspect not covered so far in the discussion. It might be a relatively small risk but if you don't take them at least you won't have the constant worry about getting them flogged in the northern lands of the light-fingered.
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Follow Up By: Les PK Ranger - Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 19:08

Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 19:08
Unfortunately that type are all over the country, maybe a bit rarer in small Tassie towns.
Fortunately a rare problem, but always pays to be vigilant.
Would be wise to chain / padlock up at night to the camper axle . . . through the cockpit and one hatch ??
Something like a medium size weight steel chain should wake you if some lowlife tries to cart them off at 3am.
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Follow Up By: Tas-tourers - Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 20:05

Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 20:05
Aaahh! We're not real big on security down here, you have me worried about this so called carefree lifestyle.
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Follow Up By: Les PK Ranger - Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 20:27

Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 20:27
Yeah it's a darn shame, we should be able to go wherever, whenever, and not have to bolt everything down, or secure our gear.
But you can often read the forums about people losing gear when touring.
Seems more prevalent in some caravan parks, but disappointingly you should be aware at all times of where your gear is and how secure it is.
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Follow Up By: Member Kerry W (WA) - Wednesday, Jul 23, 2014 at 11:10

Wednesday, Jul 23, 2014 at 11:10
We use a cheap PIR motion activated chime from Dick Smiths as a deterrent only use it on rare occasions. Have not lost a kayak in 35 years.
Kerry W (Qld)
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Reply By: SDG - Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 18:30

Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 18:30
Could always hire one as you want one.
The cost of hire could be less then the extra cost of fuel from wind resistance, plus the locals at the hire joint, could point you into the right direction. Away from the local croc
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Follow Up By: Tas-tourers - Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 20:01

Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 20:01
Hi there! That is looking like the way we will go. For the few times I will have the time and opportunity its probably the easiest and most cost effective option. And domestic harmony lol.
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Reply By: mbw650 - Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 20:36

Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 20:36
G'day Peter & Katrina,
Come down to Dover and launch your kayaks from our back yard, travel upstream into the forest until you reach a rock shelf and stop for a break and soak up the solitude of a truly beautiful place.
Then return downstream past " The Narrows " into Esperance Bay, paddle around Faith, Hope and Charity islands and if you are that way inclined drop a line in and catch a meal. Then leave the kayaks at our place so we can have a lend while you travel around that big island up north !

Regards and enjoy your trip.

Mark
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Reply By: jodie0075 - Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 20:41

Monday, Jul 21, 2014 at 20:41
I agree with SDG, hire them when convenient. So much less hassle and worry.

Cheers Gary
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Reply By: Cheryl & Ian (NSW) - Tuesday, Jul 22, 2014 at 19:31

Tuesday, Jul 22, 2014 at 19:31
A number of years ago we also went touring to different parts of Oz for 7 months. We took our canoe with us and used it many, many times and loved the adventures we had in it. We bush camp where ever we can and that often means camping by a river/dam/lake or coast, so plenty of opportunities. When we did the Mitchell falls we left the canoe at Drysdale station.

The trouble with hiring them is that you have to be somewhere that is populated. Our best adventures are usually on the smaller tree lined rivers away other people.

Cheers Cheryl

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Follow Up By: Tas-tourers - Wednesday, Jul 23, 2014 at 12:57

Wednesday, Jul 23, 2014 at 12:57
Hi Cheryl! We will be free camping as much as possible and its true what you say many spots are near waterways of some type. Now I'm confused and hubby thinks he's won already...bugga!
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Reply By: Member Kerry W (WA) - Wednesday, Jul 23, 2014 at 00:55

Wednesday, Jul 23, 2014 at 00:55
I Agree with Michelle on this one. We share a similar sense of Adventure.

7 months allow you to do some amazing things with a Kayak handy.

Why ...You could spend 2 weeks just exploring the Noosa River from Teewah Creek at Coops Corner down. Or up and down again. Trust me there are things and places there (both on the river system and within a pleasant walking distance) for you to discover that even very few locals know about.

Very few people have truly experienced the Noosa Everglades reflections at that special but short time of day when the colour of the reflections in the water match the reflections above the water - for that you have to be there at dawn or dusk and preferably not mid summer. Sure the reflections are amazing any time the water is still but when you glide through them in a Kayak and you cannot distinguish reflections from reality it becomes quite mesmerising and actually seems so unreal you dont want it to end.


Mind you I had 25 odd years to ply that area in rain hail moonshine and cyclonic conditions. You cant beat a moonlight paddle from Lake Cootharaba to Harrys Hut and beyond, paddles bumping fish - fish jumping around the kayaks...Similarly Kayaking some of Northern NSW's sand lakes is equally inspiring. Lake Arragan for some reason can be ripple free even when a strong wind blows. A moonlight paddle on Lake McKenzie (Fraser Is) where the white sand below you is illuminated like a fluro light and trust me you will have the place to yourselves because visitors these days (unlike the hardy fishermen of the last generation) do not venture from the safety of their camps at night for fear of all sorts of perils which seem only to have sprung up in the last 20 years none of which common sense and simple nouse cannot abate.

Kayaking the outgoing tide through mangroves in Bowen, visiting beach huts on the sand bars at the mouth of the Elliot River. (As for the Crocs - just ask the locals) Running the rapids in the Nymboydia River, or the tranquility of a billabong in Western Qld. Lethebrook just south of Proserpine is a pretty distraction on the way south. Baroon Pocket Dam has some beautiful inlets and in winter you may be treated to the Ghost falls in which mist overflows the valley in a surreal mass of falling damp air. Cruising down the upper Maclay River or visiting the upper reaches of the Bellengen will show you how majestic the Northen Tablelands once were... A great way to see million dollar mansions from the canals on the Sunshine and Gold Coasts Heck you could even drop into the Darling River for a few hundred ks with all the rain we might get this year.

I can see why those who have never experienced this type of magical experience would have you leave your Kayaks in the shed.

hope this helps...
Kerry W (Qld)
Security is mostly a superstition. It doesnt exist in nature. Life is either a daring adventure or nothing.
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