Inflammable goods in motor vehicles

Submitted: Thursday, Sep 04, 2014 at 18:39
ThreadID: 109394 Views:1655 Replies:3 FollowUps:2
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I am getting a new 4wd dual cab which will be mine and it replaces a company vehicle that I have had previously.
In the future I will get a long range tank but at this stage I will be carrying 2 x 20 litres in the tub.
Just going through some PDS (policy wordings) of various Insurance companies I noticed that it is an exclusion if you carry more inflammable liquid (diesel) than is allowed.
I did a google of the regulations and it seems that you are allowed to carry up to 250 litres in jerry cans. It also seems that you can carry this amount in the passenger compartment.
Would this be correct?

thanks
Honky
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Reply By: Dennis Ellery - Thursday, Sep 04, 2014 at 21:46

Thursday, Sep 04, 2014 at 21:46
In Western Australia the maximum permissible quantity is 250 litrel, which should be carried in approved containers in either the boot or on external brackets. It can be carried within the passenger compartment, such as the back of a station wagon, in approved, properly restrained containers.
AnswerID: 538615

Follow Up By: Povertypete - Friday, Sep 05, 2014 at 09:22

Friday, Sep 05, 2014 at 09:22
Hello Honky
I understand the rules differ for petrol and diesel because petrol is a lot more flammable than diesel.
I went down the dual cab trail too because of the smell from petrol and it doesn't matter how hard one tries, its always there.
So I also went diesel. Navaras have a disgusting fuel range when towing a 3 tonne van and I looked at long range tanks and the cost which immediately gets lost once installed. Then I found out about mobile fuel tanks. You may occasionally see them in the back of utes and are used to refuel machinery in the field.
The advantages are:
Cost. Way cheaper than long range tanks. In Brisbane, about $750
Residual cost. When the vehicle is sold, the tank comes out and goes in the new vehicle or gets sold.
Tank is self contained. Comes with its own pump, hose and nozzle similar to the servo ones. Only needs a 12v outlet. I used and extension lead and plugged into the trailer Anderson plug. Can also be used to refuel other vehicles
Compact. Not much bigger than the equivalent in jerry cans. Various sizes are available depending upon your intentions. I used a 100Lt one which more than doubled my range.
Any smells are contained in the back.
Spillages are contained in the ute tub.
They are legal everywhere and do not affect insurance policies.
Convenient. Fill up when prices are low. No fuel worries when touring. One does not have to stop at every fuel station and pay their sometimes ridiculous prices.

Enjoy your time on the road, there is an amazing variety of country out there

Peter

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FollowupID: 823168

Follow Up By: Dennis Ellery - Friday, Sep 05, 2014 at 10:29

Friday, Sep 05, 2014 at 10:29
It is legal, in WA, to carry petrol in or on the rear of a vehicle – I checked this a couple of years ago with both the WA Police and the WA Mines Department, see also the extract from the WA Dangerous Goods Act below.

“The maximum permissible quantity is 250 litres of petrol, which should be carried in approved containers in either the boot or on external brackets. It can be carried within the passenger compartment, such as the back of a station wagon, in approved, properly restrained containers,
but this is not recommended”
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FollowupID: 823174

Reply By: Tony F8 - Friday, Sep 05, 2014 at 15:51

Friday, Sep 05, 2014 at 15:51
You could also look at Enmach tanks, they do a variety of tanks to suit all styles of vehicles and are great to deal with. You can get a 60lt wedge and diesel transfer pump for around $300.
Cheers.
Tony F8.
AnswerID: 538655

Reply By: The Bantam - Friday, Sep 05, 2014 at 22:18

Friday, Sep 05, 2014 at 22:18
In all your considerations, remember that petrol is clasified as "flamable" and diesel is clasified as " combustable" the same clasification as wood and cardboard.

There is a great deal of difference between the clasifications, as to what is permitted and sensible.

cheers
AnswerID: 538681

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