Hand Washing Machines

Submitted: Thursday, Sep 04, 2014 at 22:14
ThreadID: 109399 Views:2109 Replies:5 FollowUps:8
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Just wondering if anyone out there uses any of the hand operated washing machines & if so what brands/types. Also would like any opinions on how good or bad they found them & whether bought in store or online.
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Reply By: Motherhen - Thursday, Sep 04, 2014 at 22:44

Thursday, Sep 04, 2014 at 22:44
Yes - in a manner of speaking. It is not hard work to use the plunger a number of times until clothes are clean, and it does as good a job as a real washing machine.



We use sealed buckets in the caravan, but you need a rough road to do a good job. The plunger is used when stationary.

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Follow Up By: Member - Tony H (touring oz) - Friday, Sep 05, 2014 at 09:58

Friday, Sep 05, 2014 at 09:58
Gee I hope you don't tip the washing water in or near that beautiful river......
Insanity doesnt run in my family.... it gallops!

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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Friday, Sep 05, 2014 at 13:37

Friday, Sep 05, 2014 at 13:37
Click on the photo and you will see my disclaimer ;)

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Reply By: WayneD - Friday, Sep 05, 2014 at 04:03

Friday, Sep 05, 2014 at 04:03
When we drove from Sydney to Darwin via Oodnadatta we used a bucket with a lid and just put in the back of the vehicle and everything was washed clean thanks to the outback roads. Suds in the first load, rinsing water in the second. Cost nothing as we got the bucket from a nearby stable.
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Follow Up By: Member - lancie49 - Friday, Sep 05, 2014 at 21:05

Friday, Sep 05, 2014 at 21:05
Wayne, Woolwash theoretically doesn't need rinsing.
If you have the time and the extra water, fine, but no real need to rinse after Woolwash.
We use it in a 20ltr bucket with agitating paddles stolen from a Hard rubbish w/machine.
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Reply By: Member - John and Lynne - Friday, Sep 05, 2014 at 07:41

Friday, Sep 05, 2014 at 07:41
Motherhen's method works extremely well, costs little and hardly adds weight. The only shortcoming is the lack of a spin drier or wringer which would be great in cooler climates to hasten the drying process. I have met people with a cherished old wringer which they found in a junk shop but they are in short supply these days. Luckily John has strong hands for wringing wet clothes but that is a chore! Lynne
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Follow Up By: Grumblebum and the Dragon - Friday, Sep 05, 2014 at 08:20

Friday, Sep 05, 2014 at 08:20
A more efficient plunger can be simply made from a large funnel - about 75% the dia of the a 20 litre bucket. I attached ours to a 1 metre irrigation riser with a tee piece screwed on as a handle. Drill a variety of holes, larger at the bottom and smaller towards the top of the funnels cone.

You may have to slit the discharge end of the funnel to accommodate the 19mm riser pipe. I then fixed ours with "No More Nails' and riveted it in place. Been good for 8 years now.

This system will create huge turbulence with little plunging effort. Same system as was used in early washing machine models - saw one recently in a museum.

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Follow Up By: Member - John and Val - Friday, Sep 05, 2014 at 09:33

Friday, Sep 05, 2014 at 09:33
John and Lynne,

Something for the well equipped Troopy...!


Cheers

John

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Follow Up By: Member - John and Lynne - Friday, Sep 05, 2014 at 10:23

Friday, Sep 05, 2014 at 10:23
That's just the thing! And not too big or heavy. We are still looking! Lynne
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Reply By: Dennis Ellery - Friday, Sep 05, 2014 at 10:42

Friday, Sep 05, 2014 at 10:42
I carry an old fashioned washer everywhere I go – she doesn’t do a bad job cooking either.
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Follow Up By: Member - bbuzz (NSW) - Friday, Sep 05, 2014 at 14:52

Friday, Sep 05, 2014 at 14:52
Mine is also a GPS with lane assist!

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Follow Up By: Mick O - Saturday, Sep 06, 2014 at 15:47

Saturday, Sep 06, 2014 at 15:47
My travelling mate Scotty has the best bush washing machine available. Capable of up to five loads in an afternoon although wash quality does drop off towards sunset. We noticed a high pitched whine coming from it on this trip but managed to lubricate it with wine. Usually very low maintenance, just on occasional back rub accompanied with words of encouragement and a glass of Baileys at the end of the wash cycle. Here's a photo.





Oh I just wait for this topic to come up. Pity it's only every couple of years or so. ;-)


Mick
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Reply By: kevmac....(WA) - Friday, Sep 05, 2014 at 22:02

Friday, Sep 05, 2014 at 22:02
Thank you all for your suggestions.Certainly gives me afew ideas, apart from the upwardly mobile washer, dishwasher gps combined.Think will discard that one for my own well being.Cheers, and will let you know which way I go.
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