Any camera buffs that can help?

Hi folks.

Just looking for some advice on a camera please.

I'm looking at buying a 2nd hand Canon Eos 40d, it comes with 3 lenses, 1 a Canon 28-135mm ultrasonic EW-78BII, 1 a Canon 70-300mm ultrasonic (Kenko) and 1 a Canon EFS 18-35mm, all with lots of switches etc on them which I can't understand; along with the camera.

I have absolutely no knowledge of cameras and am just looking for something to start playing with, my current camera a Nikon Coolpix S9300 struggles with anything slightly distant and I want to start zooming in on birds etc and catching a bit more detail (what is it with age?).

A friend of mine owns a loan office and has it for sale around the $750- mark, is that reasonable? Is a camera of this age still of enough use for someone like me with little experience? I dont want to update for a while and am hoping this would suffice for a few years. Would I need a tripod?

Much thanks in advance, any other info appreciated.

Regards Wayne.

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Reply By: Member - johnat - Tuesday, Sep 09, 2014 at 20:29

Tuesday, Sep 09, 2014 at 20:29
Simple answer, Yep, reasonable, but only IF the sensor and lenses are not damaged at all.

Since the seller is a "mate" could you, perhaps, borrow the camera for a day or two, and take heaps of shots with all the lenses at all the settings? That'd give you an idea. If the images look like they are streaky, or show scratches, then I'd but out! But of the images look OK at magnification on the camera screen, it should be OK.

Might I suggest that you check out a local camera club. These places are a fount of information, plenty of knowledgeable people and helpful as all get-out!

If you want, send me a PM
AnswerID: 538861

Follow Up By: Nutta - Tuesday, Sep 09, 2014 at 22:13

Tuesday, Sep 09, 2014 at 22:13
Thanks John.

I do have the camera to play with for a few days.

It doesn't have a cf card so I don't think it will store pics? May need to get a cheap one to test it.

After taking pics at different settings and put them on computer would I be able to see if there are any problems in the pics? Or only rely on the camera screen?

I will double check all lenses but they look spotless, the whole kit is in a Pelican case, the lenses have caps on each end and it looks as though the last owner was quite fastidious.

Camera club, great idea!

Thanks very much for your input.

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Reply By: Member - Barry H (WA) - Tuesday, Sep 09, 2014 at 21:37

Tuesday, Sep 09, 2014 at 21:37
Hi Nutta,

Yes the kit seems to be OK and at a reasonable price.

The lenses give you a good coverage, but you may struggle to get good photos of birds with a maximum of 300mm, most times you will need a minimum length of 400mm.

You don't say what type of photography you are interested in, but those lens cover a few possibilities.

One question though, you list a Canon 70-300mm ultrasonic (Kenko), Kenko are a manufacturer of Tele Convertors (lens extenders) does the kit come with a TC, if so then the 300mm then becomes a bit longer, either 420mm or 600mm, which makes it an even better buy.

You will certainly need a tripod if you are going to be using long shutter speeds (1/30, 1/15 etc) again it depends on the type of photography you are interested in.

All those switches on the camera and lenses are really quite simple, the most important thing IMHO is to understand the relationship that ISO, Shutter speed and Aperture have with each other in producing the best possible picture.

Practise, practise and then practise again.

Enjoy

Regards

Barry H
AnswerID: 538870

Follow Up By: Nutta - Tuesday, Sep 09, 2014 at 22:25

Tuesday, Sep 09, 2014 at 22:25
Hi Barry.

If the moneys right I can start out with the 300 then maybe hunt for a 400 if necessary, I think this kit may suit me though.

I'm not exactly sure what I want to take photos of yet, probably wildlife at the moment.

From what pics I could see of teleconverters on the net I don't think it has one, most had teleplus on the pic, mine doesn't, they allow 2 lenses to be joined together?

If I buy it I might also watch some youtube vids to get some pointers.

Thanks again.

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Follow Up By: olcoolone - Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 08:35

Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 08:35
Might be a lens filter Wayne is seeing the name on, teleconverter don't join two lenses together, they increase the focal length of a lens and they go between the camera body and the lens. Most teleconverters come in a 1.6 or 2 multiplication.
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Follow Up By: Nutta - Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 08:39

Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 08:39
No teleconverter then.
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Follow Up By: Jackolux - Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 21:29

Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 21:29
You don't want a teleconverter anyway
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Reply By: HGMonaro - Tuesday, Sep 09, 2014 at 22:40

Tuesday, Sep 09, 2014 at 22:40
I'm not a Canon person but a Canon 40D is getting fairly long in the tooth, it's sensor is several generations old. The 40D was a 'prosumer' camera, which means more advanced controls and better constructed than an entry level camera (of the day) but in terms of capability (megapixels captured, ISO range, focus speed and accuracy) a current day entry level camera will be miles better. No idea about the lenses, which is where there may be value in the package but for $750 if you're willing to buy 'grey' you could be something modern. eg http://www.kogan.com/au/buy/canon-eos-700d-18-55mm-75-300mm-twin-lens-kit/?utm_source=google&utm_medium=product_listing_ads&gclid=CLHEqZiT1MACFVUAvAodcHEAog
AnswerID: 538875

Follow Up By: Nutta - Tuesday, Sep 09, 2014 at 23:16

Tuesday, Sep 09, 2014 at 23:16
Hi Hg, that Kogan deal looks really hard to beat for the money, and with a warranty.

I'm a bit of a thickhead with the grey thing?

Thanks for the heads up!
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Follow Up By: HGMonaro - Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 00:06

Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 00:06
'grey' means imported outside the official local distributor channel. Means the warranty they offer is from them not Canon.
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Follow Up By: Member - johnat - Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 20:44

Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 20:44
Yep, 40D is a bit old, but, for a first steps into the world of DSLR, not a bad one. Not too much to lose, and easy to step up the ladder.

Kogan are a right PITA to deal with, though. I absolutely refuse to have anything to do with them after they refused to post a 7" tablet to my PO Box, and insisted that it be delivered to a street address. The fact that AusPost took the parcel to the PO, and put a card in the RMB which meant a 30km round trip "detour" when i got home is what p'd me off.
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Reply By: HGMonaro - Tuesday, Sep 09, 2014 at 22:44

Tuesday, Sep 09, 2014 at 22:44
forgot to say.. switches on lenses usually turn auto focus on & off, and the inbuilt shake reduction system on/off and possibly into different modes to suit when panning the camera. Generally you'd just leave them on unless you want to override them for a particular reason.
AnswerID: 538876

Reply By: Nutta - Tuesday, Sep 09, 2014 at 23:19

Tuesday, Sep 09, 2014 at 23:19
Re the Kogan link the 70d is double the price of the 700d, obviously there is a major difference of some sort, can anyone help me with it?

Cheers.
AnswerID: 538879

Reply By: HGMonaro - Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 00:02

Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 00:02
generally, the smaller the number the more 'pro' the camera, so the 70D is the modern version of the 40D you have the option on. It's a 'prosumer' camera which means compared to an entry level camera, it has better focusing system, higher frame rate (how many pictures it can take per second) and probably a much bigger buffer (how many pictures it can take before it has to write them to the memory card). It has a higher level of water resistance than a entry level camera but that sometimes relies on have lenses that are also 'water resistant'. It will also have more controls on the body where the entry level camera will make you change settings by using the menu system shown on the LCD screen. As I said before I'm not a Canon person so don't know the exact differences, but it seams the 70D is a modern 7D, as according to what I checked they are both AP-C sensor cameras with pretty similar specs. Not sure if this will work but try this linkhttp://www.dpreview.com/products/compare/side-by-side?products=canon_eos70d&products=canon_eos7d&products=canon_eos700d Ignore the $$$ they quote but have a look at the various specs and uyou can see how the 70D/7D trumps the 700D in most categories. Better camera no doubt, but you pay for it.
AnswerID: 538882

Follow Up By: Nutta - Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 06:38

Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 06:38
Thanks.

You're obviously not a Canon man, what brand do you prefer to use?
What would you recommend around the $700- $800 mark?

I'm new to it so don't need a super high spec camera at the moment, I would like something with great zoom and a reasonable pic.

Cheers.
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Follow Up By: HGMonaro - Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 11:23

Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 11:23
here goes... most typing I've done in one go for a long time!

I use a Nikon (and also have a Pentax). Anything (Canon/Nikon/Pentax/Sony) these days are good. Be careful wanting something with 'great zoom'. A lot of p&s and Bridge cameras (look a lot like a SLR but you can't change the lens) have huge zoom capability but you can't actually take a decent pic with one zoomed all the way in. The lens quality is terrible and you can't hold it still enough either! Same goes with the 18-200 and 18-300 superzooms that are available for SLRs. Convenient but not great image quality compared to a zoom of more modest range, however if image quality isn't on the top of your list of 'wants', these type of lenses can be a good choice.

Having another look at the lenses in this 2nd hand package they are not an ideal combo really for a APSC sensor camera. Why I say that is for an everyday 'walkaround' lens, you want a range from 16-18mm up to at least 50mm. This gives you a range from slightly wide angle suitable for scenic views, indoors and areas where you can't back up more to get everything in. The longer end of the zoom range is good for portraits and when you can't walk up closer to something. I have a 16-85mm lens as my general purpose lens and on holidays that covers 95% of my needs.

So, what would I recommend… I’d start with saying I think technology has come a long way quickly and that a new ‘entry’ level camera is a better choice than an older ‘prosumer’ camera. The prosumer camera is built better and will feel better in your hands along with having better controls, however, the newer camera will take better pics. Especially in darker environments. So, having settled on the new camera I’d then work out what I can buy for my budget. For $700-800 you can buy a ‘grey’ twin lens kit (like the Kogan linked 700D above). I haven’t looked but pretty sure there will be a Nikon deal at the same price point. I did notice they do another Canon deal that includes a 55-250 lens that has inbuilt stabilisation. That makes me question what the 75-300 one was in the 1st kit I linked to. A little bit more goggling indicates the 75-300 is an older lens and the 55-250 is much newer & has the inbuilt stabilisation. So, I’d immediately say although you miss a little on the long end, the 55-250 would be the better choice. This one http://www.kogan.com/au/buy/canon-eos-700d-18-55mm-55-250mm-is-ii-lens-kit/

The Nikon kit of D3200 plus 2 VR lenses (VR is Nikons term for lens stabilisation) is $669. Eg. http://www.kogan.com/au/buy/nikon-d3200-dslr-camera-18-55mm-vr-ii-55-300mm-vr-twin-lens-kit/

Either one would be fine IMO. Complicated isn’t it!
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Follow Up By: Nutta - Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 18:48

Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 18:48
Lol, complicated alright!

Thanks very much for your input, as mildly complex as it is it does help me a lot being a novice.

The 2nd hand kit I have here at the moment has 'image stabilisation' on each of the 3 lenses, are they decent stabilisers or average oldies?
It's just that you mention it in the above links.

I will take a serious look at the last 2 links, I might even save a little more and buy something a little better although probably not necessary.

Thanks again for for detailed response.
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Reply By: pop2jocem - Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 06:37

Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 06:37
Not sure if this helps or hinders but, yesterday we bought a new Canon 700D with 50 mm, 18-55 mm and 55-250 mm lenses, an extra battery, back pack type carry bag and a $40 gift voucher for $1149 with a factory cash back offer of $150 from Camera House in Cairns. The wife's older Canon finally had a hernia just at the end of the GRR.

Cheers
Pop
AnswerID: 538883

Follow Up By: Nutta - Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 06:44

Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 06:44
Thanks Pop, it all helps, add to the confusion!

Cheers.
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Reply By: garthyguts - Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 06:57

Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 06:57
i have got a 40d for, had for about 4 years good camera. but shutter action count is the key to good second hand cameras. price i would pay is $450.00 thats with a low shutter count 20/30k. lens i say are not top of the line ?
AnswerID: 538885

Follow Up By: Nutta - Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 19:52

Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 19:52
According to an app from a post below it has 9300 shots taken so sounds reasonable for its age?

Just a matter of getting a cf card and taking some shots.
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Reply By: The Landy - Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 07:01

Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 07:01
I feel you will be making a large outlay for 7 year old technology. Whether it is good value is another question.

The problem is you most likely won't have any history on the camera and it will have a service life. It will probably take good pictures, but the latest batch of entry SLRs will do it better I suspect. And the cost of getting it checked out fully won't be worth the outlay, better spent on something new...

My suggestion is to buy yourself the latest entry level SLR, whether it is Nikon, Canon, or whatever and get a 16-300 lens or the like.

Good luck snapping away!

Baz - The Landy

AnswerID: 538886

Reply By: Sand Man (SA) - Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 07:32

Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 07:32
Nutta,

Looks as though there is a good comprehensive range of lenses.
the 28-135mm is the lens most likely to be used the most.
The 70-300mm is a telephoto lens of moderate zoom capability and the 18-35mm is for close up macro work.

If the lenses are top of the range, you could buy the outfit and down the track, upgrade the camera body to a higher quality one.
A Canon 60D (fairly good unit) can be bought without lens for $800 or so.

One telephoto lens costs in the order of $500 so the overall cost seems reasonable, if the lenses are in good condition.

Bill


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AnswerID: 538887

Follow Up By: Nutta - Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 07:44

Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 07:44
Thanks Sandman.

How do I tell if they are quality lenses? One of the big ones has canon on it.

After looking on ebay at 40d and lenses the whole kit could be bought pretty cheap by the looks of it, but off different buyers and its a bit of a guessing game.

If these lenses are okay I do like the idea of being able to upgrade the camera while keeping the lenses as they obviously are the same fit.
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Follow Up By: Jackolux - Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 18:27

Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 18:27
Sandman said " the 28-135mm is the lens most likely to be used the most.
The 70-300mm is a telephoto lens of moderate zoom capability and the 18-35mm is for close up macro work "
---------------------------------------------------
That Camera has a 1.6 crop sensor the 18-35mm can not be considered a Macro lens , it will have the field of view of a
28.8 - 56mm

Nutta if you are happy with the price you probably should just buy it

You say you know nothing about cameras that makes shopping for a DSLR difficult you will only get more confused

I use Nikon cameras , Nikon , Canon make no difference . If you were a mate of mine I would just say buy a Nikon and I could teach you what all the buttons and different settings do

Do you have any friends that use either Canon or Nikon DSLR's
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Follow Up By: Nutta - Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 18:56

Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 18:56
I know if I had any problems with it within a few months; he'd help me out with something.

I'm kinda happy with it because it's all in a nice solid case.
I might see whats the best he can do with the price.

I don't have any friends that use those kind of cameras.
It'll most likely stay in some sort of an auto mode.

Cheers.

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Follow Up By: HGMonaro - Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 22:44

Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 22:44
I would just like to add, it will take good pictures. I've got images taken on worse cameras which I've had printed at 11x14" and they look great! Sounds like you should squeeze him for a few dollars off to put towards a CF card!
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Follow Up By: Member - Laurie K (WA) - Friday, Sep 19, 2014 at 19:39

Friday, Sep 19, 2014 at 19:39
Talking about lenses …… it doesn't matter how good the camera body, the glass is where the light has to go to make the image, and an average body with good glass will give better results than a good body with average glass. Also, most DSLRs are half frame cameras, which means that a 300mm lens will give the same size pic as a 450mm lens on the old SLR cameras.
Always use a tripod when using a long lens …. do as I say, NOT as I do LOL …. and you will get good shots when photographing distant targets. Also closing a lens (using F11-16) will possibly give a sharper pic than opening it up - means a slower shutter speed - tripod. Once you have taken the pic, use your screen and zoom in and look at the edges of the subject matter to ascertain sharpness.
Because the auto exposure may wash out your sunsets and the like, learn to use the exposure compensation dial to make corrections to your photo settings.

cheers
Laurie
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Follow Up By: Nutta - Saturday, Sep 20, 2014 at 21:45

Saturday, Sep 20, 2014 at 21:45
Hi Laurie.

I ended up going with the the 2nd handy, I can drip feed it for a while and it seems reasonable overall.

I purchased a tripod and back pack camera bag off Kogan, a real quality tripod too by the looks of it.

Thanks for the advice, I'm still struggling with all of the camera thing, I'm going to try to do a course in the next couple of weeks just to get the hang of it a bit.

I'll report back after I gain a bit of experience.

Cheers Wayne.
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Follow Up By: Member - Laurie K (WA) - Saturday, Sep 20, 2014 at 23:00

Saturday, Sep 20, 2014 at 23:00
G'day Wayne

You seemed to be getting all sorts of advice from everyone, but you wrote "If these lenses are okay I do like the idea of being able to upgrade the camera while keeping the lenses as they obviously are the same fit.". So I thought well, I'd put my 2 cents worth in, and make the point that the glass is more important in the overall picture, and that if you find that you want to improve picture quality, that keeping the body and changing the lenses could be a better option ….. but that is a long way down the track. I feel that you have made the right decision, and doing a course and gaining an understanding of how it works is the best way to go. Good luck and have fun. You will get hooked, I have no doubt :-)

cheers
Laurie
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Reply By: olcoolone - Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 08:30

Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 08:30
Good camera but a little pricey, I would say around the $450 -$550 for the set up would be good value..... camera body $80 - $140, 28-135 lens $100-$120 and the 18-35 $200-$240...... other lens $40-$70...... Unless in mint condition with a low shutter count.

You might be better off buying a new lower end consumer camera like a Canon 600 or 700D.

But bear in mind the 40D will still be a better camera in many aspects compared to the the 600 and 700D.......
AnswerID: 538889

Follow Up By: Nutta - Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 08:40

Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 08:40
Thanks, low shutter count means it hasn't taken many shots?

If so is there a way to tell?

Cheers.
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Follow Up By: olcoolone - Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 22:00

Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 22:00
One other thing you want to do is take a shot of a clear blue sky at the lowest aperture F4.5-5.5 with all the lenses and then view it on you computer, this will show any defects with the mirror or lenses like scratches or dust particles.
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Follow Up By: HGMonaro - Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 22:37

Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 22:37
blue sky (or blank wall) shot at min aperture (f22 or f32) shows up dust on sensors
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Follow Up By: olcoolone - Friday, Sep 12, 2014 at 08:18

Friday, Sep 12, 2014 at 08:18
Yes correct...... thinking of too many things at once.

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Reply By: Les PK Ranger - Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 09:13

Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 09:13
Yes . . . Shutter count
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Follow Up By: Les PK Ranger - Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 09:18

Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 09:18
This link also great with other links in there to importance of SC, how high a SC is too much, ec . . .
More shutter count info

Re camera and learning, it won't help much NOW buying the camera and testing, but in most regions there are great short courses to get you an understanding of the basics like shutter speed, aperture, iso, etc.
WEA in Adelaide is one such place, lots of hands on, and pretty reasonable prices . . . check out Unis and Tech colleges of the Arts too, the one in Adelaide has modules of their full photography courses that can be done.
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Follow Up By: Nutta - Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 19:48

Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 19:48
Hi Pk, that shutter count app is a ripper!

Turns out it has 9318 shots taken with 4 294 967 295 available.

That rates it at around 98% which hopefully is pretty low with a bit of life left in it yet?

Thanks for your help.
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Follow Up By: Les PK Ranger - Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 21:03

Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 21:03
Cool, glad it worked out ok.
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Follow Up By: Jackolux - Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 21:27

Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 21:27
Nutta ,( with 4 294 967 295 available ) where did you get that number and what dose it mean ?
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Follow Up By: Nutta - Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 21:55

Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 21:55
I got it from an app made for the canon cameras, it shows how many pics have been taken and how many are left, thats what it said was left, seems like a lot.
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Follow Up By: HGMonaro - Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 22:40

Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 22:40
that's hardly used!

my Pentax has done 80638
my Nikon 55350

I think the app is fibbing a bit, most dSLRs are rated for more like 100K-200K shutter actuations.
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Reply By: Wayne's 60 - Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 10:14

Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 10:14
Hi Wayne,

As others have said, check the shutter count and Google the lens types to see how they rate in the general scheme of things. The camera does seem a little over priced, a quick look on Gumtree has a number of Canon 60D listed. Body only - $500, up to $1000 for camera, lenses, cards, charger and filters. The 60D was released in 2010 and shoots at 18 Megapixels over the 40D's relase in 2007 and shooting at 10 Megapixel.
Wikipeadia has lots of basic information on where the cameras sit in the Canon range and the initial pricing. As we have indicated in posts before - buy it and learn to use it and enjoy your photography. Post your shots from your trips on-line so that everyone can enjoy them, Sally puts her images up on her Outback Adventures facebook page.

PS and this is tongue in cheek,

ask your MATE what he paid for it and give him an extra hundred on top :-)

Cheers,
Wayne & Sally.
AnswerID: 538894

Follow Up By: HGMonaro - Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 10:36

Wednesday, Sep 10, 2014 at 10:36
I wouldn't be doing that... he might have bought it all new!
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Reply By: Member - Serendipity(WA) - Thursday, Sep 11, 2014 at 18:32

Thursday, Sep 11, 2014 at 18:32
Hi Wayne

Lots of really good advice. I have a Canon 60D and love it. I mainly use the 18 to 135mm lens. This covers most of the action.

The biggest difference to the 40D is with the 60D you get a swing out rear screen. This was the winner for going the newer camera. This is so handy when taking photos in those difficult positions. Added to this the other up-specs the two cameras are quite different although coming from the same pro-sumer range. The 700D is the entry level range and to hold the two (70D or 700D) you can feel the difference - size and weight.

The one good thing with the 40D was the magnesium alloy frame but the newer 60D and now 70D have a frame just as robust just not magnesium alloy.

For that amount of money I would go the newer 70D with the 18 to 135mm lens. I bought grey import with no problems. I relied on the good reputation of Canon cameras.

In saying this the Nikon range is similar comparable quality.

If you are splashing out those dollars - go a new one.

Cheers

Serendipity


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AnswerID: 538967

Reply By: TomH - Tuesday, Sep 23, 2014 at 19:28

Tuesday, Sep 23, 2014 at 19:28
I will be different Have a Nikon D200 with an 18-270 lens.
An excellent setup and bought for the reason that I never have to change lens in sandy or windy areas.
Had 2 lens and soon got sick of changing them in inhospitable places.

Actually havent used it in a year since I bought my wife a Sony digital camera which is light and has a 20 times zoom. Does panoramas and all. it is 18mp as well Cost under $300. Stick it on intelligent auto and face recognition and its all you need.

If the OP is a camera novice I would recommend something like this and then go up to a DSLR later.

It takes better photos than the Nikon and we can carry it in a pocket whereas the Nikon and stuff weighs over a kilo and was bloody tough on the shoulder carrying it around all day.

Now with the Sony I also have a Sony XR260 video camera and am more than happy.

Have just spent 9 weeks in the US and havent had a sore arm and have about 6000 pics and 5 1/2 hours of video. All up the whole rig cost under $1000 with several spare batteries and a hand controller/tripod for the video cam.

Nothing worse than buying stuff you have to learn to use when just ready to go on holiday
AnswerID: 539450

Follow Up By: Member - Nutta - Wednesday, Sep 24, 2014 at 07:23

Wednesday, Sep 24, 2014 at 07:23
Hi Tom.

Thanks for your input.

I already have a couple of point and shoots which are great.

I wanted something a bit more challenging as I enjoy playing around with cameras and was also getting a bit bored so it gives me something to study.

It is big but comes in a solid case, I will be taking it away on holidays and won't be lugging it to far from the car anyway.

I was lucky enough to pick up a couple of good eos40d books off ebay for $15- so I'm sure they will be invaluable.

Regards Wayne.
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