"Puncture Proof"

Submitted: Wednesday, Oct 08, 2014 at 11:52
ThreadID: 109752 Views:2505 Replies:7 FollowUps:9
This Thread has been Archived
Hello All, I had a product "Puncture Proof" installed in a brand new set of Cooper A/T3 tyres.
After about a month or so I started to have wheel balance problems, had the wheels balance repeatedly, before I finally remembered what was in the tyres, and had it pressure washed out by my local tyre dealer who reported that he found the stuff all clumped up all over the inside of the tyre when he removed it.
As of this writing I have had no response from "Puncture Proof" people.
I would be interested to hear if others have any input.
But in the meantime:
DON'T WAISTE YOU TIME OR MONEY WITH THIS PRODUCT AS, FROM MY EXPERIENCE IT DOES NOT WORK.
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Reply By: PSG46 - Wednesday, Oct 08, 2014 at 12:13

Wednesday, Oct 08, 2014 at 12:13
Update: I've finally had a conversation with Tim at Puncture Proof, he says that the product was wrongly installed: IE too much product.
So now back to the installer, see what he says.
AnswerID: 540082

Follow Up By: allein m - Wednesday, Oct 08, 2014 at 14:13

Wednesday, Oct 08, 2014 at 14:13
I had a slow leak in my ford few months back and I was going to put some thing like that into the tyre and guy at the shop said not it stuffs your tyres up so I went to local tyre place and had the puncture fixed

turned out to be a nail embedded deep into the tread
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FollowupID: 825812

Follow Up By: PSG46 - Wednesday, Oct 08, 2014 at 17:28

Wednesday, Oct 08, 2014 at 17:28
Since posting I have had a really good response from Puncture Proof, no resolution yet, but they are being very responsive.
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FollowupID: 825833

Follow Up By: Freshstart - Thursday, Oct 09, 2014 at 08:59

Thursday, Oct 09, 2014 at 08:59
Personally I would give all those things a miss and just stick to the right pressure for the work at hand. Check them more often in real rough terrain. Last flat we had was in 1969. We also run Coopers with a set of rims fitted with AT's and a set with ST Maxxs which we change depending on the overall trip conditions. Take care of the tyres and don't overload them or let them overheat. Watch out for sharp objects and don't drive on the "edges" of tracks where shrubs have been cut or broken off leaving a "stake" to rip the side of the tyre off. And watch out for "stakes" if just turning around or camping and not actually on a track or road. Touch them. Wind the windows down and also listen to them. Any strange movement or feeling in the steering or the way the car moves - stop and check.

Apologies if you know this already. Okay. Just trying to help.
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FollowupID: 825863

Follow Up By: Freshstart - Thursday, Oct 09, 2014 at 09:03

Thursday, Oct 09, 2014 at 09:03
oooops Wrong "Response" button. My post was supposed to be else where not in response to Allien and PSG. maybe if a moderator is around then they may want to delete it.
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FollowupID: 825864

Reply By: PSG46 - Wednesday, Oct 08, 2014 at 14:17

Wednesday, Oct 08, 2014 at 14:17
I won't do it again, currently going the rounds with Puncture Proof folks who are saying installation was incorrect, will post when I have outcome from them or the installer, Sydney RV Centre
AnswerID: 540087

Follow Up By: allein m - Wednesday, Oct 08, 2014 at 16:40

Wednesday, Oct 08, 2014 at 16:40
some information you might want to read


some more information
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FollowupID: 825826

Follow Up By: PSG46 - Wednesday, Oct 08, 2014 at 17:26

Wednesday, Oct 08, 2014 at 17:26
Thanks, Good article, yes I have some of those American tyres, I'm on my second set having got around 70'000 k out of the first set even with all the balance problems the the puncture stuff.
I also ran the same brand whilst living in the states and have no complaints. I don't run fat tyres waste of money, my rims are standard factory size.
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FollowupID: 825831

Reply By: CSeaJay - Wednesday, Oct 08, 2014 at 17:18

Wednesday, Oct 08, 2014 at 17:18
Not sure why one would put that stuff in a brand new tyre
CJ
AnswerID: 540093

Follow Up By: PSG46 - Wednesday, Oct 08, 2014 at 17:27

Wednesday, Oct 08, 2014 at 17:27
Ah one learns from experience, lot of mining and other equipment use it.
once bitten twice shy.
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FollowupID: 825832

Follow Up By: MEMBER - Darian, SA - Wednesday, Oct 08, 2014 at 18:27

Wednesday, Oct 08, 2014 at 18:27
The general idea of puncture sealing 'gloop' is widely used in various tyre types (tubeless tyred mountain bikes for example). Tyre plugs are very effective for cars though, so this stuff might be an answer looking for a problem :-).
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FollowupID: 825835

Reply By: John and Regina M - Wednesday, Oct 08, 2014 at 19:26

Wednesday, Oct 08, 2014 at 19:26
And it may be fantastic when installed correctly.
And when installed correctly you may never know it works well as you may never get a puncture.

I guess the 'self install' stuff may be rubbish though. Although the quality of 'armchair installation professionals' known to frequent some sites will always say it's crap.
AnswerID: 540102

Follow Up By: PSG46 - Wednesday, Oct 08, 2014 at 20:02

Wednesday, Oct 08, 2014 at 20:02
There is no self install with this product as far as I know.
And think you are right, if done properly the proof would be that you never know if you get a puncture, but then how would you know :-)
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FollowupID: 825849

Reply By: Freshstart - Thursday, Oct 09, 2014 at 09:00

Thursday, Oct 09, 2014 at 09:00
Personally I would give all those things a miss and just stick to the right pressure for the work at hand. Check them more often in real rough terrain. Last flat we had was in 1969. We also run Coopers with a set of rims fitted with AT's and a set with ST Maxxs which we change depending on the overall trip conditions. Take care of the tyres and don't overload them or let them overheat. Watch out for sharp objects and don't drive on the "edges" of tracks where shrubs have been cut or broken off leaving a "stake" to rip the side of the tyre off. And watch out for "stakes" if just turning around or camping and not actually on a track or road. Touch them. Wind the windows down and also listen to them. Any strange movement or feeling in the steering or the way the car moves - stop and check.

Apologies if you know this already. Okay. Just trying to help.
AnswerID: 540123

Reply By: Alloy c/t - Thursday, Oct 09, 2014 at 10:14

Thursday, Oct 09, 2014 at 10:14
The problem with nearly all 'puncture proof' type of products [ self install or 'professional' ] is that no one actually follows the instructions fully , being a rubber - latex liquid it turns to a clump if not spread evenly , correct use is …. remove valve - pump in correct amount of liquid - replace valve - pump up tire - spin wheel to distribute liquid evenly - drive to generate heat in tire so liquid turns to semi solid membrane ,,, easy as …...
AnswerID: 540125

Reply By: The Bantam - Friday, Oct 10, 2014 at 22:15

Friday, Oct 10, 2014 at 22:15
Puncture sealing goop that you put in tyre has been arround for donkies.......it pops it uggly head up every 10 years or so......at the momement there seem to be several brands of this product having a go.

They pop up...get sold heavily...people think they are a great idea....people realise the whole idea is a crock.....the products mostly disapear from the market till people have forgotten or there is a new crop of suckers....then they re-appear again.

The whole concept is fundamentally flawed....among those who have seen it before, the problems are well known and they occur will all the similar products.

I tried one of thse goops in my pushbike tyres when I was a kid back in the 70's.....that was enough of a lesson for me.

the problems that occur with all of them.

They pretty well ruin the rim and the tyre (or the tube).....the goop gets all over both and if you are paying someone it simply may not be worth paying to get the rubbish cleaned out.

Yes the clumping and putting tyres out of balance is very common.

It is common for it to bung up the valve stem.....to such a point where the tyre can be neither inflated or deflated..

The idea that the goop will stay liquid inside the tyre, but cure on contact with air when comming thru a puncture, is optomistic to say the least....um...the tyre is full of air.

If you have a 4wd you need to change air pressures frequently if you are off roading....this brings fresh air into the tyre than will make the goop go off..real quick.


even the idea that some sort of goop inside the tyre will seal punctures is flawed......it makes no allowance for removal of a item penetrating the tyre...like a nail or screw......for any seal to be effective it would have to be a small, simple, clean puncture with no fireign body remaining in the tyre.

I could go on about the whole flawed premiss behind these products and the falssely created need and benifit in the sales pitch.

Do ya self and everybody else that may deal with your tyres a big favour and leave this stuff alone.

cheers
AnswerID: 540197

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