Remembrance day

As we near Remembrance day we know that there are a lot of EO members with Military ties. We will leave this thread stuck to the top of the list until after 11 November for your collective use to remember, honour and recognise the effort of so few for so many.
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Reply By: Oldbrowny - Friday, Oct 31, 2014 at 20:32

Friday, Oct 31, 2014 at 20:32
Lest we forget.
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Follow Up By: Member - bill j (VIC) - Friday, Nov 07, 2014 at 10:56

Friday, Nov 07, 2014 at 10:56
Lest We Forget

Australian national war memorial song. Heroes anthem.


http://youtu.be/SmHWCJ8zbUA

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Reply By: Member - batsy - Friday, Oct 31, 2014 at 20:47

Friday, Oct 31, 2014 at 20:47
Remember to buy a Poppy & give thanks to those who fought for us to keep us free, those who never came back, those who came back & still fight their demons & to the men & women of our defence force...thanks seems so inadequate.
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Follow Up By: scruffy - Friday, Oct 31, 2014 at 21:52

Friday, Oct 31, 2014 at 21:52
AMEN and thanks. Bob
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Reply By: BunderDog - Friday, Oct 31, 2014 at 21:18

Friday, Oct 31, 2014 at 21:18
My Dad in Darwin, February 1942 just a few days after the first raid with an unexploded Japanese bomb.

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Reply By: Sapper D - Friday, Oct 31, 2014 at 21:59

Friday, Oct 31, 2014 at 21:59
Appreciate your patriotism, what a great bunch of members we have---Thanks from an old digger
Sapper D
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Reply By: Ron N - Saturday, Nov 01, 2014 at 02:00

Saturday, Nov 01, 2014 at 02:00
I find it hard to imagine the suffering and trauma the WW1 blokes went through.
I have Volume XII of C.E.W. Beans & H.S. Gullets "Official History of Australia in the War of 1914-1918".
This is the "Photographic Record of the War". The pictures of the devastation, in France in particular, are unbelievable.
The devastation in the landscape pictures shows something like a moonscape.
It's incredible that anyone survived - although we know hundreds of thousands didn't.

The impact of WW1 is shown in Australia by the vast number of WW1 War Memorials that exist in nearly every major park, and in every town - including every little country town.
WW1 affected such a huge number of families in the Australian population, so many families lost one or more members.
We must always remember those who selflessly gave their tomorrow, so we could have our today, free of dictatorship and oppression.
Lest we forget.

Clapham Junction - Ypres

Sanctuary Wood - Ypres

View from "Stirling Castle" - Ypres

The Ypres pictorial collection
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Follow Up By: Bonz (Vic) - Saturday, Nov 01, 2014 at 08:06

Saturday, Nov 01, 2014 at 08:06
I dunno if you've been to Ypres or not Ron. I have. And it was the most moving place.

I cam home and read a book called Over the Top. My son is tied up with the Military and I recommended it to him, as well as anyone who wishes to appreciate the activity of WWI.

All the best mate

Bonz
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Follow Up By: The Original JohnR (Vic) - Saturday, Nov 01, 2014 at 09:01

Saturday, Nov 01, 2014 at 09:01
My grandfather fought with the British Honourable Artillery Company in WW1 and we followed up this year going to The Somme and the Western Front areas. They played many supporting roles for the Allies.

I have to agree with you Bonz about Ypres or Ieper, and you really understand the foundations of Europe were built on the blood of those soldiers. So many cemeteries, as Ron says in every small village.

Pleasing that the next two generations of males in our family are to make a pilgrimage next March to the Australian hallowed grounds of Gallipoli, the Somme Valley and Flanders Fields.

Lest we forget
Cheers,
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John

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Follow Up By: River Swaggie - Saturday, Nov 01, 2014 at 15:09

Saturday, Nov 01, 2014 at 15:09
A Debt That Can Never Be Re-paid.. Lest We Forget.

Thanks for the links Ron,Gee I hope the kids are being taught about this during there school years, it should be mandatory in my opinion if it isn't already.

The site is a credit to the Canberra War Museum.
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Follow Up By: The Original JohnR (Vic) - Saturday, Nov 01, 2014 at 18:38

Saturday, Nov 01, 2014 at 18:38
River Swaggie, 15YO grandson is the motivator to go with his school group. Son going too as guiding parent. Grandson is doing a history project that is his driver, and he has chosen to examine ourAustralian history, but also my grandfather's service. You really understand why our ancestors didn't talk of their service.
Cheers,
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John

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Reply By: Member - Rod N (QLD) - Saturday, Nov 01, 2014 at 09:31

Saturday, Nov 01, 2014 at 09:31
My Great Uncle was a first reinforcement at Gallipoli, landing 10 days after the first landing. He was WIA and eventually invalided out.

Another relative was KIA at the Somme and has 'No Known Grave'.

RIP and thanks to them and all subsequent Military personnel.
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Reply By: Member - Jeff O (VIC) - Saturday, Nov 01, 2014 at 19:20

Saturday, Nov 01, 2014 at 19:20
My grandfather enlisted on 17 august 1914.
Private James Barker Lees. 26 year of age.
12th Battalion .A Company.
He embarked from Hobart on board Transport A2 Geelong on 20 October 1914.
Died of wounds at Gallipoli on the 8th of August 1915. He was 28 at the time of his death.
His place of burial-Beach cemetery Plot 11,Row G.Grave no 6.
My grandmother was 8 weeks pregnant (with my mum) at the time of his departure.
My mum was granted a war pension of 13 pounds per annum.
Gran was granted a pension of 15 pounds per annum.
I visited his grave several years ago.
So sad!
So proud!
Lest We Forget.
Jeff.O

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Reply By: Sulphur1 - Saturday, Nov 01, 2014 at 21:10

Saturday, Nov 01, 2014 at 21:10
Watched the Centenary of ANZAC: Albany Commemoration Service on Friday night.
I wondered what would have been going through the Anzacs' minds a long time ago.
An excellent commemoration - made me emotional and proud,
Cheers
Jon
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Follow Up By: Rob J8 - Sunday, Nov 02, 2014 at 20:18

Sunday, Nov 02, 2014 at 20:18
My Dads brother V H Jones left from Albany 10th light horse.As a kid the only thing uncle Vic told me was he brought his young brother, my dad, a present. It was a German compass. All the weekends I spent at his and Aunty's while at boarding school in Perth, he never spoke of war.
I know he and dad did sometimes as I saw tears on the odd occasion.
My Dad was 2nd 16th and he didn't speak much of his involvement either. We will remember them.
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Follow Up By: david - Tuesday, Nov 04, 2014 at 15:14

Tuesday, Nov 04, 2014 at 15:14
Went to Albany for the weekend. The town did a great job to honour the memory of those who gave their all during WWI. Can recommend going to the new ANZAC centre also.
Cheers
David
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Reply By: Member - Will 76 Series - Sunday, Nov 02, 2014 at 21:13

Sunday, Nov 02, 2014 at 21:13
An important day the 11 Nov. How lucky are to be living in this cournty. I always think of not only the WW1 & WW2 & Vietnam Vets that defended and diid what our cournty requested of them but lets not forget also our more recent vets such as the Gulf War which was longer than Vietnam (10 yrs). Thank God for our World friends and how important alliances, freindship and common quality of life is.
We salute our ADF!! and Thank you!!
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Reply By: Member - Peter H1 (NSW) - Monday, Nov 03, 2014 at 16:24

Monday, Nov 03, 2014 at 16:24
My father joined up the first week in 1914, #346, sailed via Albany with the first convoy. Served at Gallipoli, 1st Field Ambulance, 1st AIF. He was 28 years old.
Simpson [the man with the donkey in the same unit].
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Follow Up By: BunderDog - Wednesday, Nov 05, 2014 at 08:25

Wednesday, Nov 05, 2014 at 08:25
My Grandfather #4091 joined up 5/1915 and also served with the 1st Field Ambulance
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Reply By: Pushy - Tuesday, Nov 04, 2014 at 14:08

Tuesday, Nov 04, 2014 at 14:08
My wife and daughter were in France recently and at the last minute decided to visit the graves of two relatives who fought and died on the Somme. Initial research identified the resting place of both, coincidentally both served within a short distance of each other,were both brothers of our maternal grandmothers and were both 24 and single when killed.

One is buried at Corbie and my wife is sure that she is the first relative to visit.

The other was killed in the battle of Mouquet Farm just to the n-w of Pozieres.This month long battle for the Aussies resulted in over 10,000 casualties. All for the taking of a 500 m strip of land approx 2 km wide.He was killed on the last day before the Aussies were withdrawn due to depletion of numbers.His body was never found, either blown to bits or covered in mud. All that was returned to his family was a set of goggles.

Both are sad indictments of the total waste of warfare.
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Follow Up By: Bonz (Vic) - Wednesday, Nov 05, 2014 at 18:44

Wednesday, Nov 05, 2014 at 18:44
Hey Pushy, I have been to Belgium, Ypres and surrounds. Appalled at the loss of life for seemingly useless advances across mere metres of mud and wasteland, I shed a tear at Tyne Cot Cemetary at the sheer magnitude of the loss. But what I reckon is that EVERY LIFE LOST contributes to our current way of life. It may seem a total waste but I asked myself, what if they hadn't fought? What of they hadn't pushed back? What if we'd laid back and been steamrolled by every dictator, zealot, barbarian over the years. Our life would be very different now.

We owe them all a huge gratitude, for what we all have now.

Cheers mate

Bonz
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Follow Up By: Mick O - Thursday, Nov 06, 2014 at 23:14

Thursday, Nov 06, 2014 at 23:14
My great uncle Charles died in the 3rd battle of Ypres (Battle of Paschendale) in 1917. He was 22 years of age and with the 4th Division Ammunition Corp, killed when a shell hit his donkey laden with ammo on his way to the front line. His brother Dick was ahead of him and didn't realise what had happened till he stumbled on Charlies remains on the way out. Dick loaded what he could recover of Charley on his donkey and carried it out. He is buried in the small cemetery at Westhof Farm.

Dick went ashore at Gallipoli in reinforcements a short time before the withdrawal. He saw action in some of the worst of the battles in the Somme and survived to come home. He lived to be 98 passing away in 1982, hearty and hale to the end. As an 18 year old I listened with rapt attention as he recountered his war years as if they were only last month. Very matter of fact, very free of emotion, very shocking and incredibly humbling. The youth of our young nation slaughtered. Lest we forget.


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Follow Up By: Bonz (Vic) - Sunday, Nov 09, 2014 at 16:50

Sunday, Nov 09, 2014 at 16:50
Been to that exact place Mick, I am in awe of the goings on there
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Reply By: vk1dx - Wednesday, Nov 05, 2014 at 08:35

Wednesday, Nov 05, 2014 at 08:35
It's been a long time since I posted but this thread is very dear to me.

My father got wounded in Darwin. A part of the war that we are now thankfully also remembering. His ship, the AHS Manunda (A Hospital ship !!!!), was bombed in Darwin Harbour where he was wounded and many years later in 1964, he was finally at peace.

We have also visited Albany and I must say the memorial at the top of the hill got me going. What an expedition and no bloody wiki leaks to ruin it all. None! How the people must of banded together. 100% of them keeping Mum, is beyond me. Simply amazing.

Please note that the rest of this post is not intended to take anything away from our fighting members of the serves of both sexes, but . . .

What I also think of are all those wives and girlfriends and families , like Mum, who were suddenly left alone with a bunch of kids, no job because most women looked after us at home, and maybe a family to feed and a home to manage on a pittance of a military wage. No shoulder to share the burden with. God it must have been hard. You know she never spoke about it. Neither did Dad talk about the war. At least I was able to talk to my wife over the phone occasionally and ease some of the burden.

Who has been to Geraldton and seen the statue of the woman leaning into the western wind against all odds, looking into the western sky, waiting and hoping for her man to come home. She will forever remember. Poignant isn't it. The image shook us up when we went there. It still does.

I always have and will remember them all.

Thanks for the thread.
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Reply By: Member - johnat - Wednesday, Nov 05, 2014 at 21:40

Wednesday, Nov 05, 2014 at 21:40
Just back from a short trip to WA, down through the South West. Hard to forget the town of Kojonup, where just about every property had a display of poppies. The town seems to have really got behind the centenary, and good on them!
The school has painted poppies on a "mural" on their fence, businesses in town have poppies growing in containers all around the place and houses have them in their front gardens.
Thoughts are with the current crop of guys and gals sent into harm's way - come back safe, all of you!
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Follow Up By: Ron N - Friday, Nov 07, 2014 at 10:51

Friday, Nov 07, 2014 at 10:51
John, Kojonup is the town with the statue of Brigadier Arnold Potts, MC, DSO, MID, OBE - who was an outstanding Gallipoli veteran and the hero of Kokoda.
Potts farmed at Kojonup for many decades and regarded it as his home.

Potts distinguished himself at Gallipoli, and all through WW1 - but was shot in the chest at the Battle of Hamel (the famous battle run by Major General Sir John Monash which established standard battle tactics for all wars since, and which was won precisely in 93 minutes. Monash had allowed 94 minutes for the action).

Potts injuries at Hamel were so severe he was invalided out of the military. However, he had recovered enough by 1939 to be declared medically fit and was again inducted into the military with the rank of Major.

Potts was responsible for establishing the jungle fighting tactics of the AIF troops placed under his command, and was then placed in charge of "Maroubra Force", the 2 militia battalions (39th & 53rd) and the 3 regular battalions of the 21st Brigade.
The militia battalions of this era were 18 and 19 yr old kids with only a few weeks of basic military training.

Maroubra Force was sent up the Kokoda track to meet head-on with the 10,000 battle-hardened Jap Marines coming down the spine of PNG.
Potts realised he was outnumbered and outgunned - and he was also short on every basic requirement from food to ammo.
The Jap snipers hidden in treetops took a terrible toll on the Aussies. So he organised a highly strategic fighting retreat - but was immediately relieved of his command and told by MacArthur and Blamey that he and his men were cowards.

Nothing was further from the truth and the incompetent Blamey and arrogant MacArthur had no idea of the battlefield situation, due to a total lack of intelligence. Blameys angry speech to the remnants of Maroubra Force where he claimed they were "running rabbits", was greeted with anger and disbelief.

Potts stands head and shoulders above all the PNG campaign military leaders - but he and his men of Maroubra Force were never given the recognition they deserved for many decades.

It wasn't until MacArthur and Blamey had been dead for years, before the truth was revealed about the gravity of the situation that had confronted Potts and his men.
The man is worthy of more than just a statue, he's one of our great War heroes who suffered much maligning, due to incompetence at high levels.

Arnold Potts - Wikipedia
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Reply By: Pradobob - Thursday, Nov 06, 2014 at 10:16

Thursday, Nov 06, 2014 at 10:16
I work in a Child care centre to High school in SA. The 700 kids range from 1-19 years old. The local RSL has given us 700 poppies to put on our school oval, which in turn will form a large poppy on a raised knoll, visible from the road. Older kids will assist the little tackers and it will lead to the service after.
As an ex-serviceman, I think this is the best tribute to our fallen that I have ever been involved with. (in a school) We hope it runs smoothly. I'm sure my late uncle, killed in action, 1942, ex-2/48th Battalion, would approve.
Lest we forget.
Bob
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Reply By: Bob Y. - Qld - Saturday, Nov 08, 2014 at 13:00

Saturday, Nov 08, 2014 at 13:00
Bonz,

There's a great website that some people may not know about, if they had relatives that served in WWI. It's called Discovering the Anzacs.

Website is discoveringanzacs.naa.gov.au

Can't do a link with this over intelligent iPad. :-)

I've just spent an hour or more, going through the details of a great uncle who served in Gallipoli and France. Some 51 pages of letters, documents and reports.....very interesting and nostalgic.

Bob

Seen it all, Done it all.
Can't remember most of it.

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Follow Up By: Bonz (Vic) - Sunday, Nov 09, 2014 at 16:52

Sunday, Nov 09, 2014 at 16:52
Thanx Bob, what a great read
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Reply By: RodH, Sydney - Saturday, Nov 08, 2014 at 18:09

Saturday, Nov 08, 2014 at 18:09
I am in London at the moment with work, staying right in the centre of London. The huge involvement of the public in the lead-up to the 11th is emotional on its own. I can't imagine what Tuesday is going to be like.
Rod, Perth

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Reply By: Member - Terry (SA) - Sunday, Nov 09, 2014 at 15:38

Sunday, Nov 09, 2014 at 15:38
Mark Knopfler from Dire Straits play The Last Post on the guitar,as his WW 1 tribute

Cheers
Terry
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Reply By: DBN05 (tas) - Monday, Nov 10, 2014 at 13:52

Monday, Nov 10, 2014 at 13:52
Thanks Boz,

for remembering, but lets not forget " The forgotten War " we all remember WW1, WW2 Viet Nam the Gulf wars etc BUT the Koran War never gets spoken about. A war that the 3rd battalion RAR stood fast against hordes of charging Chinese troops while the USA troops pulled back and left them on their own. The president of America awarded 3RAR a Presidential citation for their action. The RAAF and our Navy also fought many battles.
In my eyes you are not forgotten Thank You.

DBN 05
I NEVER get lost, but don't i see a lot of NEW places.

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Reply By: Manfred b - Monday, Nov 10, 2014 at 21:38

Monday, Nov 10, 2014 at 21:38
Our Vietnam Vets went off to war, some not even of their own volition, when they returned they were spat on, abused, called child killers and forgotten by all including their own government. Many fought for years for compensation and rehabilitation, some are still fighting to this day. A shameful period in our nations history. A very special thank you to our Vietnam Vets, heroes in every sense of the word!
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Reply By: Sir Kev & Darkie - Tuesday, Nov 11, 2014 at 08:43

Tuesday, Nov 11, 2014 at 08:43
At the going down of the sun...

I crouched in a shallow trench on that hell of exposed beaches... steeply rising foothills bare of cover... a landscape pockmarked with war’s inevitable litter... piles of stores... equipment... ammunition... and the weird contortions of death sculptured in Australian flesh... I saw the going down of the sun on that first ANZAC Day... the chaotic maelstrom of Australia’s blooding.

I fought in the frozen mud of the Somme... in a blazing destroyer exploding on the North Sea... I fought on the perimeter at Tobruk... crashed in the flaming wreckage of a fighter in New Guinea... lived with the damned in the place cursed with the name Changi.

I was your mate... the kid across the street... the med. student at graduation... the mechanic in the corner garage... the baker who brought you bread... the gardener who cut your lawn... the clerk who sent your phone bill.

I was an Army private... a Naval commander... an Air Force bombardier. no man knows me... no name marks my tomb, for I am every Australian serviceman... I am the Unknown Soldier.

I died for a cause I held just in the service of my land... that you and yours may say in freedom... I am proud to be an Australian.


Words of Rememberance


Russell Coight:
He was presented with a difficult decision: push on into the stretching deserts, or return home to his wife.

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Reply By: Wayne's 60 - Tuesday, Nov 11, 2014 at 12:15

Tuesday, Nov 11, 2014 at 12:15
Greetings Bonz,

It is almost the appointed hour in W.A. and we too honor those who gave to protect our way of life.

We have been in the Brookton area (of W.A.) running a little research for future tours.

On our last trip we were advised that the Brookton Shire had the largest ratio of Noongar aboriginals sign up for active duty through a number of wars. The current Brookton Historical Society members are trying (like crazy people) to have this contribution to OUR war effort recognised.

Apparently, no aboriginals are recognised for their contribution.

This is being rectified.

Lest we forget.

Regards,
Wayne & Sally.
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Follow Up By: Member - Duncan W (WA) - Tuesday, Nov 11, 2014 at 16:43

Tuesday, Nov 11, 2014 at 16:43
G'day Wayne I was at the Katanning Ag Show a couple of weeks ago and they had a display of all the Aboriginals from the area who had gone to war. I was gob smacked by just how many of them there were.

Agree that these guys should get the recognition they so rightly deserve.

Dunc.
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Follow Up By: Wayne's 60 - Tuesday, Nov 11, 2014 at 17:54

Tuesday, Nov 11, 2014 at 17:54
Hi Dunc,

Ditto at being amazed at the large number of aboriginals who fought.
Recognition is long overdue.

Cheers for your comment.

Wayne & Sally.
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Reply By: eric t - Tuesday, Nov 11, 2014 at 19:42

Tuesday, Nov 11, 2014 at 19:42
May we. Never forget thanks to all that fought and gave so our lives are what they are today
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Reply By: B1B2 - Tuesday, Nov 11, 2014 at 19:51

Tuesday, Nov 11, 2014 at 19:51
This is taken from 'Anzacs at War' by Dr. Peter Pederson.

Lieutenant Frank Bethune's hand written order to his machine gun section before the German offensive on the Western Front 13/3/1918.

Special orders to No1 section

1. This position will be held, and the section will remain here until relieved.
2. The enemy cannot be allowed to interfere with this (sic) programm.
3. If the section cannot remain here alive, it will remain here dead, but in any case it will remain here.
4. Should any man, through shell shock or other cause, attempt to surrender, he will remain here dead.
5. Should all guns be blown out, the section will use Mills grenades and other novelties.
6. Finally, the position as stated, will be held.

I was really moved by this, and these blokes had already been fighting for 3 or more years,

Bill

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