insurance covering 35" tyres

Submitted: Thursday, Jan 01, 2015 at 17:00
ThreadID: 110583 Views:3550 Replies:7 FollowUps:19
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Happy new year to everyone!
just wanting to put a 3" lift and 35" tyres on my 105series landcruiser but just wondering does any body know of a insurance company who WILL cover them! My current one will not so may have to change but dont know if anybody actually will in the case of an Accident
cheers!
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Reply By: TomH - Thursday, Jan 01, 2015 at 17:38

Thursday, Jan 01, 2015 at 17:38
If its not legal in your state possibly no one will cover it and for good reason.
AnswerID: 543577

Reply By: Mick O - Thursday, Jan 01, 2015 at 17:44

Thursday, Jan 01, 2015 at 17:44
Matt, I don't like your chances but give TCIS Insurance Brokers a call. They are 4x4 insurance specialists.

TCIS Brokers

Cheers Mick
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AnswerID: 543578

Follow Up By: matth j - Thursday, Jan 01, 2015 at 17:49

Thursday, Jan 01, 2015 at 17:49
Thanks boys yeah i dont think i will have much luck just wondered how and why so many people run them knowing they dont have insurance! I would if i could find somebody who did
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Follow Up By: get outmore - Thursday, Jan 01, 2015 at 18:51

Thursday, Jan 01, 2015 at 18:51
you assume they have insurance .... much less a license

besides you can still insure it - just dont tell them - then you roll the dice if it gets picked up by an assesor etc
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Thursday, Jan 01, 2015 at 18:51

Thursday, Jan 01, 2015 at 18:51
Because they think they can outsmart the insurers by running home & changing the wheels in the event of an accident.
Bit hard to do from a hospital bed!

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Follow Up By: matth j - Thursday, Jan 01, 2015 at 18:56

Thursday, Jan 01, 2015 at 18:56
Yeah hahah! Ill stick to my 2" and 33's and maybe save up for some lockers cheers boys
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Follow Up By: garrycol - Thursday, Jan 01, 2015 at 19:06

Thursday, Jan 01, 2015 at 19:06
I am glad I have a vehicle that has the equivalent of a 5" lift and and 35" tyres as standard so I have no issues getting insurance as my vehicle is not modified.

Garry
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Follow Up By: matth j - Thursday, Jan 01, 2015 at 19:20

Thursday, Jan 01, 2015 at 19:20
Must be a 105 series yeah
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Follow Up By: Roachie.kadina.sa.au - Friday, Jan 02, 2015 at 19:40

Friday, Jan 02, 2015 at 19:40
Several years ago I had a Nissan Patrol, cut to a dual cab, with a 6.5 Chev Diesel engine....That beast was HEAVY (over GVM; thus technically "illegal"). I was also running "illegal" 35" tyres. I was also running a 4" lift.

We were doing a trip up to Birdsville, and going to cross the Simpson Desert. Just before we reached Cordillo Downs disaster struck....I cracked the chassis of the Nissan.

Had to get it trucked back here to SA and then drove it "bobtail" (ie: I took the box off the back, so it was just the chassis showing) down to a place called "Chassitech" in Adelaide, where it was booked in to be fixed under insurance.

The assessor duly called to the business, looked the Patrol over and confirmed it was to be an insurance job. There was never any question about the tyre size!

Now, if I had have done some sort of damage to the vehicle that could have been attributed to the larger tyres, then the assessor could well have taken that into account and decided NOT to approve the claim.

Such damage could have been caused, for example, if I had a high speed rear-end collision, where it could have been argued that perhaps my braking performance was marred by the larger tyres being fitted.

Same thing goes for the suspension lift....

So, with all due respect to all the respondents above who say your insurance will be voided, I reckon you'll find that you won't have an issue unless the bigger tyres are deemed to be the reason why YOUR vehicle caused an accident.

On the other hand, I would be more inclined to be worried about the constabulary pulling you up and giving you a ticket and/or a canary for having an unroadworthy vehicle. However, there are plenty of blokes running tyres that are technically illegal, but never have any issues.

Roachie

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FollowupID: 830627

Follow Up By: TomH - Friday, Jan 02, 2015 at 20:21

Friday, Jan 02, 2015 at 20:21
With respect, just because you had a illegal vehicle and got away with a dumb assessor doesnt make it right.

How would you go if because of the decreased braking ability you hit a car a killed someone.

Still OK ????
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FollowupID: 830632

Follow Up By: Roachie.kadina.sa.au - Friday, Jan 02, 2015 at 20:52

Friday, Jan 02, 2015 at 20:52
Tom,

I wasn't trying to say it was okay....just that a lot of blokes do it and have no issues (either by causing accidents or getting booked).

In the cae of my Patrol, I had upgraded the brakes with slotted rotors and stainless steel braided lines etc (I spent many hundreds of dollars!!) and that beast stopped better than it did when it was on stock tyres!!

So, no, I don't advocate or encourage people to modify their vehicles and then go out and use them as lethal weapons.

Cheers mate

Roachie
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FollowupID: 830633

Follow Up By: garrycol - Friday, Jan 02, 2015 at 21:10

Friday, Jan 02, 2015 at 21:10
As long as the vehicle with bigger tyres still meets the minimum braking standards then no modifications to the braking system may be needed.

My Landrover with 35" tyres runs drum brakes all around and still meets braking standards.

Garry
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Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Friday, Jan 02, 2015 at 22:51

Friday, Jan 02, 2015 at 22:51
You may well get away with it and many do. It is when you don't the bleep e can hit the fan and affect you financially for the rest of your life

It is a case of whether you are prepared to expose yourself to the potential risk and take a gamble

To all of those who say the insurance company have to prove that the illegal mod contributed to the accident, that all sounds fine and dandy but the reality is your car is off the road sitting in a holding yard, the insurance company are saying we are not paying or fixing it with whatever reason they choose to use and you need your vehicle to go to work etc etc
The dispute can go on for many months and be very costly, you have no vehicle and possibly still paying your car loan at the same time

I saw this happen only a couple of months ago where a friend killed his motor from hydraulic lock after driving through a deep puddle during a flash flood in a storm
Insurance company took water samples and said that there was fluoride in the water and accused the owner of sabotaging his motor
After a couple of months of arguing with the insurance company he gave up and had it towed home and bought a reco motor and fitted it himself so that he could get back on the road

Bottom line is the insurance company has the upper hand as they write the cheques
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FollowupID: 830638

Follow Up By: Crusier 91 - Saturday, Jan 03, 2015 at 08:24

Saturday, Jan 03, 2015 at 08:24
TCIS have recently changed hands, they are now owned by the American Arthur J Gallagher and prices have now shot through the roof.

Shannons seems to be the last frontier for reasonable pricing for legally modified off roading vehicles and terrain, though they do not give salvage writes, only first option to buy wreck.
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FollowupID: 830646

Reply By: gbc - Thursday, Jan 01, 2015 at 20:41

Thursday, Jan 01, 2015 at 20:41
Get your car engineered and swerve tested and you'll get insurance. An engineer might tell you to bugger off for a hundred other reasons first though. Then there's the ncop document. I know of an 80 series that got engineered on 44's in QLD but it was no straight forward process. Your lift and tyres are outside the ncop so the only way is the hard way and it isn't worth it.
AnswerID: 543582

Follow Up By: matth j - Thursday, Jan 01, 2015 at 20:48

Thursday, Jan 01, 2015 at 20:48
I have heard recently a engineering cert is no longer valid anyway! But seems theres alot of money in it anyway. I wont bother cheers mate
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Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Friday, Jan 02, 2015 at 09:32

Friday, Jan 02, 2015 at 09:32
I don't know why a engineering certificate would not be valid if done properly and with a suitably qualified and recognised engineer.

I have one on my vehicle and my rego renewal papers have it noted on them plus they sent me a letter when it was originally done acknowledging the change and giving me revised rego paper with the amendments noted.
That is in NSW, maybe other states are different
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FollowupID: 830589

Reply By: Kenell - Friday, Jan 02, 2015 at 21:40

Friday, Jan 02, 2015 at 21:40
I can't comment on the legalities of the modifications you are contemplating but I can tell you the insurance position on roadworthiness. If a vehicle is involved in an accident and subsequently found to be unroadworthy the insurer can only deny a claim if the roadworthiness issue contributed to the accident. If the insurer finds modifications on an insured vehicle that were not declared at inception it might be non disclosure which can void the policy. It all depends on the actual questions that are asked. In my experience most don't ask about wheel size or suspension mods on 4wd vehicles.
It is Russian roulette on the roadworthy position though. A rollover might be contested and its a hell of a time to be having an argument with an insurer when your truck is deep in the scrub with a caved in roof.

Kenell
AnswerID: 543632

Follow Up By: Crusier 91 - Saturday, Jan 03, 2015 at 08:26

Saturday, Jan 03, 2015 at 08:26
^^^^^^^^^^^
100%
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FollowupID: 830648

Reply By: mountainman - Saturday, Jan 03, 2015 at 22:41

Saturday, Jan 03, 2015 at 22:41
You can get a engineers certificate for about 500 or soo ish..
they will require you to have a speedo correction box
check current tyres match existing or better manufacturers specs and check the efficiency of the brakes

not many in nsw had to go through the swerve test... but QLD anal police or road ministry are pretty strict.
as for engineers certificates..
and modifications AFTER engineered does in fact void certificate.

current engineers certificate are STILL current.. as long as the owner does no more mods.
like go up a tyre size again..
or such as go from a 3seat ute...
to 2 bucket seats.. and engineered..
then to put the factory seats BACK in requires another engineer certificate.

cops do weekend blitzes in the bush all the time.
keep it legal and engineered
then you wont get pulled off the road
AnswerID: 543688

Follow Up By: TomH - Saturday, Jan 03, 2015 at 23:37

Saturday, Jan 03, 2015 at 23:37
You are 100% correct about the plates for the seats I did that when I took all out but front two in a LC Had to get one when I did it and another when I replaced them back to normal, two years later.

Mod numberr is LK1 Also had to take paperwork to TMR and get rego papers altered both times.
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FollowupID: 830699

Reply By: Member - GUPATROL - Sunday, Jan 04, 2015 at 05:55

Sunday, Jan 04, 2015 at 05:55
The best way is to see if it can be engineered by a certifier to the specs you required if it can be and passes then u should have no trouble getting insurance
AnswerID: 543693

Reply By: matth j - Sunday, Jan 04, 2015 at 16:56

Sunday, Jan 04, 2015 at 16:56
Yep wont be putting 35's now i dont want to take such a risk, i may just save for some lockers ;) cheers boys
AnswerID: 543731

Follow Up By: Crackles - Thursday, Jan 08, 2015 at 20:41

Thursday, Jan 08, 2015 at 20:41
Matt this thread is a classic example of people with little or no 1st hand experience giving opinion as gospel. I know 5 people who have made insurance claims with 35" tyres all of which where approved. I personally know of no-one who has been refused.
Toyota & Affinity were 2 that definitely paid out. Not sure of the others.
In all cases the oversized tyres were noted on the policy along with countless other mods.
While I run 35's I have little concern about insurance paying out if the time came. 33" tyres are however a far more sensible choice for those that like to challenge their vehicles attracting less of the wrong attraction.
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FollowupID: 831059

Follow Up By: TomH - Thursday, Jan 08, 2015 at 21:20

Thursday, Jan 08, 2015 at 21:20
To Crackles
Maybe they did but are they legal where the vehicles were located.

Also unless they contributed to whatever the claim was about they may not have been considered.

All very well to say they dont mattter without providing details of the claims.

Some companies may allow them others wont touch them especially if illegal in the state they reside.
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FollowupID: 831063

Follow Up By: Crackles - Thursday, Jan 08, 2015 at 21:51

Thursday, Jan 08, 2015 at 21:51
All 5 vehicles Tom were technically unroadworthy in Victoria, there is no denying that. But that was irrelevant as the companies insured the cars knowing that. Three of the cars were rolled so it could easily have been argued that the big tyres contributed to the accident yet they still paid out.
Definitely agree that most companies wont touch them & why it's important to have the tyres noted on the policy, as it is with almost any modification, legal or not.
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FollowupID: 831066

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