Comment: Small Blue Flower - help please

Submitted: Wednesday, Jan 21, 2015 at 13:34
ThreadID: 110829 Views:1639 Replies:2 FollowUps:22
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Plant gurus, help is needed to ID this little flower. There are 2 photos posted, one from the Badgingarra area and one from around Bremer Bay, so it would seem to be quite widely distributed. Neither photo shows much in the way of leaves. The flower structure is a bit unusual so I cant even guess at a family let alone anything more specific that that. Any ideas?
Cheers,
Val
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Reply By: pop2jocem - Wednesday, Jan 21, 2015 at 19:57

Wednesday, Jan 21, 2015 at 19:57
Billardiera variifolia???

Maybe!!!

link

Cheers
Pop
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Follow Up By: pop2jocem - Wednesday, Jan 21, 2015 at 19:59

Wednesday, Jan 21, 2015 at 19:59
Forgot, click on google images after getting to page.
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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Wednesday, Jan 21, 2015 at 23:20

Wednesday, Jan 21, 2015 at 23:20
Not at all like the climber we have here Pop.

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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Wednesday, Jan 21, 2015 at 23:43

Wednesday, Jan 21, 2015 at 23:43
I now see the photos Val has shown us were taken in September. The Billardieras I know are summer bloomers.

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Follow Up By: Member - John and Val - Thursday, Jan 22, 2015 at 18:39

Thursday, Jan 22, 2015 at 18:39
Hi Pop,
I think the centre of the unknown flower is rather different to Billardiera. Keep the ideas coming though, I think this one will be a tough one.

Cheers,

Val
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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Thursday, Jan 22, 2015 at 18:42

Thursday, Jan 22, 2015 at 18:42
I was up until near midnight Val, and I didn't get a lead on it, but I bonused because I got a few of my elusive ones. That little blue flower is exquisite so had me fascinated.

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Follow Up By: Member - John and Val - Thursday, Jan 22, 2015 at 22:05

Thursday, Jan 22, 2015 at 22:05
Thats a marathon effort MH! Glad you got some spin offs though. I am really stumped on this one.

Cheers,

Val.
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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Thursday, Jan 22, 2015 at 22:11

Thursday, Jan 22, 2015 at 22:11
Not a lot of activity on that Facebook page Val, but you never know. So hard to identify wildflowers without a name - a real catch 22.

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Follow Up By: pop2jocem - Thursday, Jan 22, 2015 at 23:04

Thursday, Jan 22, 2015 at 23:04
Val,

Have you considered the possibility that you have come across a plant that is yet to be classified?

Hmmm, xxxxxxxxxxx valeryii does sort of roll off the tongue.

Good hunting.

Cheers
Pop
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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Thursday, Jan 22, 2015 at 23:11

Thursday, Jan 22, 2015 at 23:11
I doubt it Pop, as the two photos are from very different places; Bremer Bay and Badgingarra (allowing for a typo) and have similarities. While I bet there are flowers out there not classified, they would have their family classified.

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Follow Up By: pop2jocem - Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 00:08

Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 00:08
You sure MH,

lizard

This little guy didn't just stand there. He scampered around the sand dunes just south of Perth and still only just got "discovered".

What are the chances that some little blue,red, yellow flower got missed in the vastness of our bush.

Just saying.

Cheers
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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 00:19

Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 00:19
New species of creatures are being discovered all the time, and with flowers most times it is because when seen were thought to be a specific plant, but botanists decided it was different and another sup species or species was named.

valeryii does sound good, and such a pretty flower, but odds on someone has already put a name on it.

PS: Val will have her answer when she wakes in the morning; it has been ID'd by an expert, so I won't tell tales out of school ;)

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Reply By: Nomadic Navara - Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 00:17

Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 00:17
An introduced species - Wahlenbergia capensis - widespread in WA?
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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 00:24

Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 00:24
Yes, that's it Peter.Florabase
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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 00:39

Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 00:39
Belated birthday greetings for yesterday Peter - I missed it this year :O.

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Follow Up By: pop2jocem - Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 01:20

Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 01:20
Well done Peter.

So after all that it turns out to be an introduced weed that apparently originated in the cape area of South Africa and found our soil types and climate to it's liking.

Sounds a bit like the ever present (during spring) Cape Weed (Arctotheca Calendula), and not let's forget the ubiquitous dandelion. (;=)).

Cheers
Pop
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Follow Up By: Member - John and Val - Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 07:19

Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 07:19
Thanks so much Peter - you get the chocolate frog award! And as MH spotted (she must have eyes in the back of her head LOL) I got a response from a WA wildflowers Facebook group too so there is no doubt that this pretty little flower is in fact an introduced weed. Not much like our east coast Wahlenbergias either - though in the flesh might be more recognisable.

So now Cienne, what is your next challenge for us? Your photos have really kept us on out toes.

Thanks everyone for your efforts.

Cheers,

Val
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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 09:53

Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 09:53
Not as invasive as Capeweed Val, and much prettier, but is certainly has spread a long way, as has the far less appealing South Aftrican Orchid Disa bracteata which has also spread from Albany to Geraldton and much of the hinterland.

Yes, eyes in the back of my head Val; I am a Mother after all. You had a good victory with that page.

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Follow Up By: Member - John and Val - Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 17:14

Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 17:14
MH I didn't know what to expect from that FB group - often there are nice photos there but no names which is really frustrating. So I was pleased to get such a quick response.

That little blue flower is a good example of something that looks quite innocent but is nevertheless a weed. I wonder how it got here - garden escape maybe.

Cheers,

Val.
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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 17:33

Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 17:33
Probably as a garden flower Val as it is so pretty. The Disa I mentioned was a garden escapee as are a number of listed wildflowers. It doesn't make them a weed, just an alien species. The alien species tag comes up quite a few times on Florabase. I have seen a number of wildflowers around here that I suspect were originally not native to this area; same with birds and insects.

When I first joined Facebook (under a pseudonym for my family's privacy) I joined a WA Orchid page, and Di correctly ID'd an orchid I found and posted. So I followed her home and joined her WA Wildflower page too, although it is a lot less active than the orchid page.



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Follow Up By: Cienne - Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 21:43

Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 21:43
Thank you everyone for all your efforts in identifying my beautiful weed.

I am a novice to wildflowers. Easy to take the pictures, but trying to identify them is something else!

I'll see what else I can find.....

Cheers.
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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 21:53

Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 21:53
So well photographed Cienne. I have a lot of trouble getting my camera to focus on blue and white flowers. I have some lovely little rich blue Lobelia gibbosa flowering outside my front gate, and in three days of trying to get them, all my photos have failed :(.

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Follow Up By: Member - graeme W (WA) - Friday, Jan 30, 2015 at 02:26

Friday, Jan 30, 2015 at 02:26
Hi Motherhen. A couple of things for you try that may help. Use an umbrella or such so that the flowers are not in full sun and if still overexposed back the exposure off till they are right. Not sure what camera you have but it will probibly have to be a manual setting to do this. I usually have mine set on AV 10 or higher and use manual focus. Because the shutter speeds will be slow a tripod will help. If you can use the rear screen to focus through even better as you should be able to increase the subject size and focus more clearly. Hope this is some help.
cheers Graeme.
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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Friday, Jan 30, 2015 at 13:34

Friday, Jan 30, 2015 at 13:34
Hi Graeme and thanks for your tips :). The umbrella is a great idea as often a mixture of light and shade in the bush makes it difficult. I use point and shoot cameras and it is just about impossible to get them with an eye view these days. I cannot use the screen for accurate focus so use automatic settings.

Cheers

Judy
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