100 series Landcruiser electrics problem

Submitted: Monday, Feb 02, 2015 at 21:07
ThreadID: 110962 Views:2050 Replies:6 FollowUps:4
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Hello members....I've got a brand new battery slowly losing amps bit by bit each day, and can't for the life of me--(and my local autolech) find the reason why.---Even switched another fully charged battery in to see if maybe I had a dud new battery, but it too lost a bit each day. In a week it'll drop from about 12-60 charged to 11-70ish----we've checked the usuals for leakage,--radio, uhf, all lights, even a recently fitted chip and compressor, every thing I think is electrical---they all appear innocent-----anyone had a similar issue, or have heard of the problem---appreciate any advice .....
Regards...SapperD
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Reply By: Zippo - Monday, Feb 02, 2015 at 22:20

Monday, Feb 02, 2015 at 22:20
In the absence of any other responses, here's the procedure I would follow ....

Start by sourcing a suitable clamp-on meter to check for this residual current drain. Then, with the meter in place - clamped across the main positive lead(s) - start pulling fuses. If that doesn't reveal a culprit and you end up with ALL the fuses out (unusual) you will need to relocate the meter to the fixed/unfused circuits and those fed via a bolt-in fusible link. A wiring diagram for the vehicle is important in your endeavour.

If you can't find a clamp-on meter ("tong-tester") then plan B is to lift the battery positive terminal and insert your multimeter in series there ("+" to battery and - to terminal, of course) on a suitable current scale (*). This will of course kill the power to the ECU etc so be prepared for the re-learning. Measure what the parasitic current draw is. It should be no more than 50mA or so. Again, pull fuses while noting any significant reduction in current. The culprit is there ....

Most often these problem currents come from aftermarket items but not always. OEM alarm systems have been known to get into "a state" and load up more than their spec current.

(*) On initial connection, a sizeable inrush can occur, so don't start out on a low current range.

Whichever way you go, DO report back here so others can keep track of what you find.
AnswerID: 545255

Follow Up By: Darren B2 - Monday, Feb 16, 2015 at 13:30

Monday, Feb 16, 2015 at 13:30
Dont forget to also try isolating your alternator as faulty/grounded diodes can also draw current. Good luck.
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FollowupID: 833696

Reply By: Member - Stuart P (WA) - Tuesday, Feb 03, 2015 at 08:48

Tuesday, Feb 03, 2015 at 08:48
the most common causes are clock, radio, interior light, glovebox and centre console lights
not forgetting those lights if fitted to sun visor makeup lights and of course any accessory ever fitted. if you have one of those rust preventers try disconnecting that. some alarm systems draw more when dis armed
AnswerID: 545267

Reply By: Gronk - Tuesday, Feb 03, 2015 at 11:21

Tuesday, Feb 03, 2015 at 11:21
As said, shouldn't be hard to trace...at least to a circuit anyway....but I doubt whether the auto lec is trying too hard...or he's a dud !!
AnswerID: 545280

Reply By: Phil B (WA) - Tuesday, Feb 03, 2015 at 11:45

Tuesday, Feb 03, 2015 at 11:45
I had the same prob with my 100series and it drove me nuts, I had batteries checked all good, but still kept losing power. Eventually went to a battery place that had the old style battery tester (resistance thingy) he soon found I had a cell on the way out but it didn't show on the electrical/electronic battery tester.

The Cruisers ECU had detected the fault and kept 'hunting for correct voltage' in doing so was using up the battery power. When I replaced the battery it all stopped.

It was a weird situation but I got there. Moral of the story - get the old fashioned battery load tester onto it to make absolutely sure your batts are okay.


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AnswerID: 545281

Follow Up By: Krooznalong - Tuesday, Feb 03, 2015 at 14:15

Tuesday, Feb 03, 2015 at 14:15
Phil - he said he tested a different battery with same result. Unlikely both would have a dying cell!
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FollowupID: 832825

Follow Up By: Phil B (WA) - Tuesday, Feb 03, 2015 at 14:36

Tuesday, Feb 03, 2015 at 14:36
Hi Krooznalong
That's true re him trying a different battery.

Being a 100 series he would have at least two batterys. The new battery may not be the problem, the other old battery may now be showing up because the new battery is in place.

I reported this on LCOOL and found another person had the same grief.

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FollowupID: 832827

Reply By: Krooznalong - Tuesday, Feb 03, 2015 at 14:16

Tuesday, Feb 03, 2015 at 14:16
Sapper - go to LCOOL site and post your question on there.
AnswerID: 545286

Reply By: Sapper D - Tuesday, Feb 03, 2015 at 19:53

Tuesday, Feb 03, 2015 at 19:53
Thanks all for your input, I'll follow up with those suggestions,----Phill !--about the two battery's,- as most LC owners do, I've split them to have one as the crank only, and the other as a auxillary,--the aux hasn't lost a drop, it's the brand new crank that's the problem.---incidently the previous replaced battery did the same to completely dead, so I assumed it had run it's race and bought this new one, --as things have turned out, it was probably ok--goose me!
AnswerID: 545303

Follow Up By: TomH - Tuesday, Feb 03, 2015 at 20:26

Tuesday, Feb 03, 2015 at 20:26
I had a similar problem. I had rigged an EGT gauge and a Trans temp gauge up incorrectly and they were drawing power all the time. Put a relay in and that fixed it.
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FollowupID: 832846

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