Tyre Pressure Monitoring System, Which one?

Submitted: Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 07:32
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Hi all, we are preparing for our trip in August and we need to update our TPMS, as our old system no longer works and we cannot get parts. so my question is, Which one is better?
Regards Judy
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Reply By: HKB Electronics - Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 07:59

Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 07:59
Check out inawise, they maket a very good product, display has extended
aerials that in most cases make repeaters unnecessary if you have a typical van and if you have something bigger long range sensors are available again negating the need for a repeater.

Also has some nifty features such as simple one button push to reset alarm settings
if pressuring tyres up or down.

Customer service is also excellent.

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Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 09:43

Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 09:43
Another vote for the Inawise
Had mine for a bit over 2 years and happy with it.
Contact them direct for purchase, they are very helpful in choosing the best model for your needs.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 10:47

Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 10:47
I agree on Inawise. Been using mine for several years. Has alerted me twice before tyre damage.
Few, if any, others accomodate two spare tyres. And, as above, very quick and easy to switch settings for 'aired-up' and 'aired-down' with their "4WD" models.
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Allan

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Reply By: Mick O - Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 11:06

Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 11:06
I've used a few over the years and have always come back to the Sensatyre with internal sensors. They have a variety of sensors to suit most travel requirments. I'm notoriousely rough on tyres so external, valve mounted sensors can suffer a lot. Most travellers would find screw on sensors or valve based sensors satisfactory.

I've had mine in five years now and still going strong. I've also found Hannibals customer service to be second to none and always prepared to assist you or trouble shoot over the phone with you (I buggered up some of the leads - replaced in a day)

I did a bit of a review here.

http://www.exploroz.com/Members/92954.750/12/2010/Product_Review_No_6_-_Tyre_Pressure_Monitoring_Systems__TPMS__-_Sensatyre___Tyredog_Systems.aspx



Cheers Mick
''We knew from the experience of well-known travelers that the
trip would doubtless be attended with much hardship.''
Richard Maurice - 1903

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Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 12:03

Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 12:03
I am interested in fitting internal sensors, but have doubts that transmission would be satisfactory through the ALL steel tyres that we run which are effectively a Faraday cage.
Anyone with practical experience?

Cheers,
Peter
OKA196 Motorhome.
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Follow Up By: HKB Electronics - Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 13:23

Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 13:23
My Polaris works with steel belts as does my Inawise, the Polaris TPMS is built into the GPS/Sound/video system and looks after cars tyres, I doubt they would work if fitted to the van. The Inawise looks after the van and spares, the Inawise has remote antennas that can be passed through the firewall for example and can be located under the vehicle to ensure it can pickup the sensors. Inawise also have long distance sensors that have a stub antenna for maximum range if required.

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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 14:31

Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 14:31
Hi Mick,

Your endorsement of the Sensatyre is a sound recommendation to me.
The 'strap-on' sensors seem superior to the internal valve-stem type. (I understand that 'strap-ons' are quite popular with some individuals. lol)
At my next tyre replacement I will consider changing to Sensatyre.

I carry two spare tyres and for my Inawise system it is necessary to swap the 'Code Keys' on the receiver to match the tyres in use. A somewhat fiddly operation. How is the matching achieved with the Sensatyre?

The Inawise adjustment for 'air-up' and 'air-dowm' is reasonably convenient with a simple switch operation between the two modes. How is this operation achieved with the Sensatyre?

I agree with you that travellers who are not 'going into the rough' would find external screw-on sensors satisfactory.
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 16:16

Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 16:16
Peter,

I doubt that the steel belting in your tyres would act as an effective Faraday Cage.

What are "ALL steel tyres"? Are your sidewalls fully covered by steel wires?
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Allan

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Follow Up By: Mick O - Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 16:17

Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 16:17
Alan, the sensor keys are only entered once at the time of setting up. I'd imagine these are already pre-coded if you buy it in kit form. I had mine stretched over eight tyres so I had Hannibal program the sensor with all the codes prior to sending (they then marked each sensor according to the tyre it was to go in).

If you are moving tyres around after that, it's very simple. You simply select the tyre using the display screen and scroll through to the position you now want it to be on the vehicle and display and press select...Done. It's all fully prompted so an easy maneuver.

"Air-up or down", are you talking about setting the pressure alerts for high or low pressure?
''We knew from the experience of well-known travelers that the
trip would doubtless be attended with much hardship.''
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 16:39

Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 16:39
Thanks Mick,

Selecting tyre position sounds easy. Probably much easier than fiddling with little 'key' modules of the Inawise.

Yes, by "Air-up and "Air-down" I was referring to changing tyre pressures from say 45psi for highway to 18psi for sand. My Inawise has a simple switch that sets the 'highway' lower threshold at 27.5psi and the "sand" lower threshold at 11.6psi.
Quick and easy but only if those pressures are acceptable to the user.
How is your setting changed in that circumstance?
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Mick O - Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 17:01

Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 17:01
Allan, I simply lower my warning threshold to the desired pressure then lower the tyre pressure. I must confess I've never examined if there is a push button preset available. Raising and lowering threshold pressures is a very simpler operation.

Found this on Youtube. A promo video but gives you an idea.


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trip would doubtless be attended with much hardship.''
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Follow Up By: Mick O - Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 17:14

Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 17:14
Peter, I use big, ugly steel belted radials myself and have never had an issue. I've seen the Faraday cage line used from one bloke on the Oka forum some years ago but I reckon his set up back then may have been at issue. I'm at a loss to see just where an insulated tyre would generate enough internal charge to act as a faraday cage. You'd have to have bare wire conducting to the steel of the rims at the very least. If anything it's the vehicle body itself that acts as the cage and not the tyres.

These things are used in all manner of tyre and vehicle. If in doubt I'd simply ring Hannibal and ask their advice. If it was to be an issue, you may have to go with external sensors.

Cheers Mick
''We knew from the experience of well-known travelers that the
trip would doubtless be attended with much hardship.''
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Follow Up By: Echucan Bob - Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 19:09

Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 19:09
I started off with an internal system years ago (Smartire). It worked well but what a PITA needing to remove the tyre to fit the sensor.

I then moved to a screw on system (Tyre dog). It was OK too. Despite being screw on I have never lost or damaged a sensor despite a fair bit of off track desert work. It had a mickey mouse little receiver, but displayed each tyre's data continuously.

I have recently acquired a Steelmate system with scew on sensors. The big advantage is that it uses Bluetooth to talk to your phone or iPad, rather than another bit of kit need dash space and a connection.

I haven't given it a serious run yet, so unable to comment on effectiveness.

The only sensors ever to be damaged were the internal ones - damaged when changing a tyre despite advising the tyre lad of its presence.

Bob
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 19:22

Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 19:22
Bob, I see a problem. What if your wife's on the phone to her sister when the tyre event occurs? lol
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Allan

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Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Wednesday, Mar 04, 2015 at 11:59

Wednesday, Mar 04, 2015 at 11:59
Re.....
"I doubt that the steel belting in your tyres would act as an effective Faraday Cage.

What are "ALL steel tyres"? Are your sidewalls fully covered by steel wires?"

Yes Allan, the sidewalls are all steel as well as the belt, so including the rim, the sender will be totally enclosed by steel.

Cheers,
Peter
OKA196 Motorhome.


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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Wednesday, Mar 04, 2015 at 12:04

Wednesday, Mar 04, 2015 at 12:04
Well Peter, in that case there may be some attenuation of the transmitted rf signal although it is more difficult to create an effective Faraday Cage than you might think.
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Allan

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Reply By: pop2jocem - Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 11:46

Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 11:46
I'm also looking for a TPMS for car and van so thanks Judy and Laurie for posting.

A couple of newby questions.

With the externally mounted sensors I would imagine you would just remove and fit to the appropriate wheel/tyre when rotating the tyres. With the internally mounted ones is it a simple "re-programming" of the sensor so that you know not only that a tyre is deflating, but which one???
I'm assuming here that they do let you know which particular tyre has the leak.

I have 2 sets of wheels and tyres for the ute which I fit to suit the terrain I am about to tackle so probably an external set for me unless I fit 2 systems. The van only one set so no worries there.

Cheers
Pop
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Follow Up By: HKB Electronics - Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 13:30

Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 13:30
Most system use a key code that corresponds to the individual sensor, it can be keyed into some systems (not to bad) when you change the tyre location, other system have to relearn the code by sleceting the tyre position and then letting air out of the tyre so the the sensor transmits and alarm and unit learns the code (a fiddly and painful system)

Inawise have a key, you plug the key into the position on the display that corresponds to its wheel position (easy and quick)

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Reply By: The Landy - Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 14:50

Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 14:50
Hi Judy

I use the Doran 360 and wrote a review. It continues to function perfectly 18 months down the track!

Doran 360 Review - The Landy

Cheers, Baz – The Landy
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Follow Up By: evaredy - Wednesday, Mar 04, 2015 at 13:26

Wednesday, Mar 04, 2015 at 13:26
Another Doran user here and am very happy with it. Very good unit and easy to setup and use.
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Reply By: Idler Chris - Vic - Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 17:23

Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 17:23
Sensatyre for this little wood duck too. Peter at Hannibal, the distributor, gives great service. They simply do the job perfectly and mine have been going for years. Knowing the temperature of your tyres enables you to look after them and prolong their life. Basically if they are heating up either slow down or put some air in, and the reverse if their temperature is below normal. I am about to get some new Toyo Open Country tyres and at $400 each, tyre monitors are good insurance. On a rough road a puncture may not be noticed until the tyre is destroyed, but with tyre monitors you know straight away and usually you just put a plug in and you are away again in 5 minutes.
What other people think of me is none of my business.
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Follow Up By: Member - Jim - Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 18:09

Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 18:09
For me it is the Sensatyre from Peter at Hannibal.
I have 10 tyres monitored at the present (5 on Cruiser and 5 on Van) and never had a problem.
Easy to do for the rotate (once you get your head around the process) and the ability to monitor both pressure and temperature.
I have the additional receiver under the caravan in my setup

Cheers,
Jim
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Follow Up By: TomH - Wednesday, Mar 04, 2015 at 13:13

Wednesday, Mar 04, 2015 at 13:13
Can I ask Jim how the 5th sensor (presumably on the spare ) worked.

I tried the same and it never worked because there was no rotation to "Wake it up"

It therefore always read the same or frequently not at all.
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Follow Up By: Member - Jim - Wednesday, Mar 04, 2015 at 17:14

Wednesday, Mar 04, 2015 at 17:14
Tom

I know that some of mine are asleep on initial start up and they don't send data until the car/van moves.
With the spare it may well be a bit of vibration that kicks it off but both spares come up on the display.
Mine have been in use for 3 years now and have not given any issues.

Cheers,
Jim
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Reply By: disco driver - Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 18:37

Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 18:37
After some consideration, I decided to go with the "Boots" system.
It's cheap, works well, doesn't need any sort of connection and there's nothing to go wrong.
Before I move off I check all the tyres using the system, all's well so off we go.
Every time we stop for a break I get the system out and check all tyres again.
With experience one can tell whether or not the system needs to be brought into operation while still moving but you do have to stop.
This is the only disadvantage. The "Boots" system can only be used when the vehicle and trailing unit are stationary.

How does it operate?
The driver opens his door, alights from the vehicle and walks round the outfit kicking each tyre in turn(that's where the boots come in). Again, with experience he can determine if any tyre has lost pressure since the last check by the sound and rebound the boot makes when contacting the tyre. If necessary, remedial action can take place, either pumping up or changing the wheel.

IMHO this system is far more reliable than any others on the market, nothing to go wrong, no cost to the owner, cheap and easy to carry and operate,

What more do you need??


Disco
(written with tongue firmly in cheek)
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 18:52

Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 18:52
Disco, I think you are confused.
What you describe is the system used to evaluate a car on the used-car lot. It must be performed with an air of nonchalance. lol
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Allan

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Follow Up By: disco driver - Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 19:16

Tuesday, Mar 03, 2015 at 19:16
No Allan,
You've got them mixed up.
The guy kicking the tyres in a used car yard, he's just a casual tyre-kicker. He's got nothing else to do.

The bloke kicking tyres seriously is applying the "Boots" system to check on the state of pressure in his tyres prior to setting off on a long trip. He's making sure that he wont have problems further down the track.

Does that clear up the misunderstanding.

Disco.
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Follow Up By: noggins - Wednesday, Mar 04, 2015 at 13:04

Wednesday, Mar 04, 2015 at 13:04
Ahhh Yes of course
Now I see it
Just like the transport driver with an iron bar hitting the tyres and listening to the sound produced, only in a smaller scale.

Works great for a lot of people and has been around since time began ( early drivers of beasts would have given the beast of burden a kick or two I imagine )

Harder the boot the better the sound and of course ,the result.




ZZ
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Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Wednesday, Mar 04, 2015 at 13:45

Wednesday, Mar 04, 2015 at 13:45
The "Boots System", Disco? Didn't know you were an old truckie......? :-)

This is my heavy duty "Boots" applicator. Saves the shins, and kneecaps, when kicking the inner duals.



Bob

Seen it all, Done it all.
Can't remember most of it.

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Follow Up By: pop2jocem - Wednesday, Mar 04, 2015 at 13:51

Wednesday, Mar 04, 2015 at 13:51
Nah, you blokes have all got it wrong. Well apart from noggins who has nailed (no pun) it part way anyhow.

Ya see, it all started during the era of the horse and cart. Now it's been well known that "the noisy wheel gets the grease". Equally well know is that the "willing horse gets the work".

So keeping those 2 well known philosophies in mind, and casting our thoughts back a while, picture, let's say the legendary Farmer Brown, on his way to market with his horse drawn cart loaded with produce for sale.
As he wends his way to market on the atrocious roads of yesteryear, some of you will say "what's changed", but moving right along, he hears the distinctive sound of one of his cart wheels getting in need of attention. Now as in that bygone era there were no such devices such as per the subject of this thread our good farmer needed to determine by trial and error which wheel was the noisy one.
This is where his trusty hard working horse came in handy. Being a beast that was more in tune with his surroundings than most draught horses he would have noticed which wheel was holding up proceedings, so to speak, as they went along. All the our erstwhile farmer had to do was walk around the cart kicking each wheel in turn.
When he came to the troublesome one that good old horse would let out a loud whinny.
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Follow Up By: pop2jocem - Wednesday, Mar 04, 2015 at 13:58

Wednesday, Mar 04, 2015 at 13:58
So fast forwarding a few generations, and remembering that practical knowledge gets past on from father to son.
We have the tradition of kicking the wheels of a car that we may be considering purchasing.

See it's a little know fact that lacking a little "horse sense" the modern horseless carriage will actually communicate with us through it's wheels and tyres.

And so the latter day practice of tyre kicking has actually been past down through the years.



Cheers
Pop
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Reply By: Member - Laurie K (WA) - Saturday, Mar 07, 2015 at 03:21

Saturday, Mar 07, 2015 at 03:21
Please excuse me for re-publishing my Inawise review in full, but the link will take you to my website which is against the forum rules.
I noted that someone said that changing the modules around was a pain when rotating wheels ..... it's not necessary to change them. A TPMS is there to alert you to a problem before you wreck a tyre (or yourself). and the Inawise does this well. I ran this review past Inawise before publishing and they approved of what I wrote with no changes.

TPMS-203 Tyre Pressure Monitoring System

Review by Laurie Kibblewhite

I have had numerous incidents with my caravan over the past few years, where I have lost a wheel, destroyed a rim, and managed to save one by pulling into a rest bay by sheer chance just after one of my caravan tyres shredded itself. I have also had a couple of punctures that we discovered because of a device I was using at the time. It was always a back wheel that was the culprit (I have a tandem axle van).

Now the wheel loss was my fault entirely - didn’t check the wheel nuts after a service ..... but the rest .....
I use a Weight Distribution System, which keeps my caravan incredibly stable - even on three wheels - we followed the drag marks 40 kms back along a dirt road trying to locate my lost wheel - never did find it ...... and it was noise that alerted me to the wheel that got destroyed. A twitch going down a hill was also an indication, but all caravans twitch at some stage .......
I installed a Tyre Pressure Management System (TPMS) on my caravan. (basically a car system, but fitted to my van - I figured I would know when my car tyres were going down). It worked with the transmitters fitted inside Dust Caps, and sent tyre pressure and tyre temperature information to a display affixed to the windscreen. It alerted me to two punctures that we got - one in a rest area, and one in a service station, and those two alerts basically paid for the TPMS. However, two caps were destroyed when tyres disintegrated, and the replacement caps were $100 each.
And so for a while (I was also off the road with illness for 18 months) I basically had no warning system on the van. When planning for my current trip, I recalled that I had a tyre go flat on the Kalumburu Road and it was another traveller who brought my attention to it - we were travelling with reduced tyre pressures, and the road being rough, were sliding around a bit anyway. And so I decided to look at what was available, and it was a post on Facebook by another traveller, (I can’t remember who it was and can’t find the review) that led me to investigate the TPMS manufactured by INAWISE.

I decided that I needed an 8 wheel system, one that covered my car AND my caravan. I found their website (www.inawise.com), found my local distributor (Albany Bridgestone Tyre Service - ABTS), and made my enquiries. ABTS had been a distributor for two years and had never had an enquiry, and so handed me the brochure I required, and I headed off to do my homework. I worked out from my experience with my previous system what I needed to know about this unit, and went back to ABTS, who contacted INAWISE and passed on my queries. Eventually, I needed to know a few more technical details, and so ABTS gave me the number of the company, and I spoke to Eddy from INAWISE about my concerns.
The main points were
Does the unit register when you lose a wheel?
How are the transmitters fitted to the wheel?
How much does it cost to replace transmitters?
How long do the batteries last?

There was not a convincing yes to losing a wheel. The company is working on that scenario, but it wasn’t perfected at that time.
The transmitters replace your valve stem - they are fitted inside the wheel, and so loss of battery and/or dust cap is not a problem
The figure was quite low - much less than the $100 for my old system
The battery life should be the life of the tyres at least ( and most tyre sets last several years - in my case more often - every couple of years) and so time will tell.

We decided to go ahead with the system, and ABTS were excited when it turned up, to be involved in installing this high tech gear into my wheels. The instruction book came out, and we decided to wire the unit through the cigarette lighter - it can be hard wired. The antenna has a really strong magnet and hangs underneath the car.
Ironically, the day of the fitting coincided with their second enquiry about the system, and the so the enquirer was able to see the system and watch it being fitted.

OK, so how well does it work?

I towed my van home, and next morning came out to my car, and the unit started beeping, and one of the numbers on the display unit was flashing, and the tyre pressure was indicating low........... and so, I checked the tyre, pumped it up, and towed the van back to ABTS, who found the valve stem was loose. They pulled the tyre off and checked the alignment of the sender as they tightened up the stem. All fixed, and no more problems.

We were travelling north, when the beeper took off and I took a few seconds to realise that the TPMS was talking to me, and one of the numbers was flashing. The tyre pressure on one of the tyres was reading high. WHY?

And then I remembered. The unit is factory set at 50 psi, and will tell you if you are 30% over or 20% under that figure. Well, on the van, that was fine, but I had been running my car at 40 psi. And so we had to tell the unit that that was our cold tyre pressure number. This is done by pressing a button at the back of the unit for 5-6 secs, and this resets and overides the factory setting. Fine, except I later set my rear tyres on the car to 44 psi, and when they got hot and increased the tyre pressure to 52psi, the unit told me so. ( 30% of 40 psi is 12 psi, and 52 psi had been exceeded.) And so it meant that I needed to reset the cold tyre pressures.
We were doing a run on dirt roads out of Halls Creek, and so I reduced the tyre pressures to 30 psi, and was again warned by the TPMS that my tyre pressures were below the 20% threshold, and a display reset was required to fix that.
The unit works, and works well.
My only gripe was the display unit itself. It is Green LED lighting behind a dark, glossy convex screen. The book tells you for best results to mount it away from the sun. Being a windscreen mounted unit, that isn’t easy to do, and so, during a bright sunny day it is difficult to monitor (even more so when wearing sunglasses,)
I phoned Eddy at INAWISE, and we discussed this. Surprisingly (or maybe not), they have had requests from owner to install a switch to turn the display OFF, and just have the audio working. They found the unit a distraction. Me, I like to see what is happening, and when the warning signal is transmitted, I can see instantly which wheel is having the problem (flashes).
INAWISE are addressing these concerns.

The unit works, it covers ALL of my wheels (and will do up to twelve wheels - it was developed for trucks), and is in my opinion well priced. You only have to save a couple of tyres at $300 each to have the unit pay for itself.

Incidentally, I paid for this unit, and have written the review to alert caravanners that such a system does exist, and works, and in my opinion, is cheap insurance.

FOOTNOTE: If you are reading my trip blogs on the Savannah Way, you will have noticed that I had a slow leak that wasn't immediately obvious from looking at the tyre. The pressure was set at 40 psi, and once the leak got below that, the TPMS did it's job when I fired up, and let me know that I had a problem, which wheel, and the current pressure. This review was written a number of weeks before that incident.
1.9.13

We had a couple more tyre problems that this unit alerted me to. One was near Winton in Qld, when I obviously ran over something that really whacked the underside of the vehicle. A second or two later, the TPMS started beeping, and inspection revealed that the rear tyre (same one as before as it turned out) was flat. It turned out to be a different problem, a wide cut in the tread of the tyre - possibly a piece of metal, and the tyre was dead.

On my way back to WA, the TPMS watned me again that I had a leaking tyre. I chose to pump the tyre and keep going. It alerted me again next morning. It was certainly doing its job. Turns out that on my diversion to have a look at Ivy Tank (video on YouTube), I managed to stake a tyre, and the twig was still embedded in the wall of the tyre.
21.12.13

Surprisingly, ALL of these tyres were on the car, and the caravan tyres gave me no problems at all.
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Reply By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Saturday, Mar 07, 2015 at 12:54

Saturday, Mar 07, 2015 at 12:54
It seems to me that a very simple economic system could be designed whereby the receiver did not attempt to display the actual pressure of individual tyres. Merely monitoring the transmissions from each tyre and annunciating an alarm if any deviated outside of the set parameters. It would then be necessary to inspect the tyres to determine which one raised the alarm, a not too onerous task. (This is where steel-capped boots are handy)

Such a system would be much simpler and cheaper to manufacture, occupy less real estate on the dash, be very easy to set the alarm point with merely an up-down button, and most importantly have no limit to the number of sensors nor require individual coding. Any spare tyres fitted with sensors can be reasonably expected to remain within the set points and not produce an alarm.

One of the problems of modern appliances is that many are designed to have a multitude of complex 'bells & whistles' simply because it is reasonably easy to do so rather than simply doing the primary job correctly. Who needs 36 different programmes on their washing machine?
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Idler Chris - Vic - Saturday, Mar 07, 2015 at 14:40

Saturday, Mar 07, 2015 at 14:40
Temperature is just as important as the temperature maybe changing but has not reached to warning point which warns you before any real damage not after it has started to happen. Also from cold the warning will be going until the tyres warm up, people will not use it. When I pay $400 a tyre I want to look after them so I want to know the temperature and pressure all the time the same as engine temperature.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Saturday, Mar 07, 2015 at 15:04

Saturday, Mar 07, 2015 at 15:04
Chris,

As with existing units including your Sensatyre, temperature would of course also be monitored with the system I proposed above. The system would work exactly as existing models but as an alarm only without readout of current pressure/temperature.

I cannot follow what you are referring to regarding the"....warning will be going until the tyres warm up". Does your system do that? Neither will my proposal.

If you want to closely monitor all vehicle variables then of course you will need gauges on everything that concerns you. My proposal was for the relaxed driver who only wishes to be advised if variables deviate from the "safe zone".
Cheers
Allan

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