Hi-beam and spotlight etiquete

Submitted: Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 15:57
ThreadID: 116939 Views:2843 Replies:13 FollowUps:38
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Hi all,

We've just moved to the southwest region of WA from Perth so I've been doing a lot of driving backwards and forwards over the past couple of weeks and a lot of early morning and night runs to avoid peak traffic times. One thing I've noticed is that it's quite common for people to leave their hi beams and spotlights on when they are on the opposite side of a dual carriageway. With the plethora of super bright LED's etc on the market now it seems every second vehicle is sporting some after market lighting of some sort. They seem to think because they are on the opposite side of the highway and it's broken up by a bit of shrubbery that it won't burn the retina's out of drivers coming in the opposite direction. Well it does and it's dangerous! It's worse when you flash someone for it and they start to flash back at you like you're the one doing something wrong! Anyway rant over :)
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Reply By: Batt's - Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 16:59

Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 16:59
There's a lot of people out there who just don't care then play the innocent card when they know better all you can do it play the game and blind them back by leaving yours on it's a pathetic game but some driver are dumb asses that's why I ended up fitting 4 spotties bugger them. More often than not I've used mine because I travel roads that lots of arrogant miners use. It's just like all the w**kers that insist on blinding us with their fog lights which are totally illegal to use when it's not foggy I blame the cops for not stopping it they have little pathetic blitzes which achieve very little you can easily sit on the peak down hwy and book 50 plus drivers a night but some are still stupid enough to persist using them. A while ago I had an idiot behind me that keep persisting in using his high beam when he was about 200 mts behind me they were bright lights on a modern car I tapped the brake lights then eventually had to flash him with the reverse light but he persisted to put them on when we hit straight sections so I ended up leaving it on until he dropped way back. When we got to the next town he speed up behind me and it was a hwy patrol car but he didn't have the guts to pull me over because he knew he was in the wrong I was hoping he pulled me over regardless of me flashing him.
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Follow Up By: Work2Travel - Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 17:30

Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 17:30
Hi Cruiser,
This reply from Batts is a big part of the problem. This bloke buys four spotties so he can be involved in a "pathetic game", where he will blind other drivers and leave his spotties on if he feels he needs to. He also has some sort of rear facing light so he can blind people coming up behind him. Imagine the kaos on the road if everyone took this attitude.
If I am coming up to a vehicle that is still on high beam, I will give them a quick flash with mine, and generally they will then dip theirs. But if they still leave them on, I dont do anything else, they will be past you soon enough, and they wont be your problem anymore. Its not worth getting worked up about it, as some people do.
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Follow Up By: Batt's - Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 19:02

Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 19:02
Already had 2 on their but what should I do just slam the brakes on and pull over to the side of the road hoping nobody rear ends me. Obviously you have courteous drivers in your area and not the arrogant ones like up here who deliberately leave their light on when cresting a hill after you have flashed a warning that is very visible and also quite often people leave there headlight on when their heading toward you even after you have flashed them several times and refuse to drop them until their within a couple of hundred meters or less. So you have never seen a vehicle with a separate reversing light used for camping or reversing along bush tracks amazing I've been using them since the 80's. I prefer not to have the need to react and should't have the need to but there are more idiots on the road so what should I do buy them a cup of tea and talk about it.
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Follow Up By: Fab72 - Friday, Mar 06, 2015 at 20:01

Friday, Mar 06, 2015 at 20:01
In the late 70's they introduced a small lever thing on the bottom of rear view mirrors to tip them to an angle whereby the light from following vehicles won't blind the driver.

Even better, today most cars have electric wing mirrors....a simple adjustment on the switch has the same results.

Yes I get the trailing lights might get annoying, but losing your cool while driving is dangerous and simply not worth it. If it bugs you that much, pull over, let the guy pass, then return on your merry way.

Being right doesn't help you if you're dead.

Fab.
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Follow Up By: Batt's - Saturday, Mar 07, 2015 at 21:20

Saturday, Mar 07, 2015 at 21:20
Most tray back utes don't have electric mirrors and I have slowed down before and let people pass and returned the favour of blinding them back why not some people can only learn the hard way. But don't get the impression that deliberately go out driving looking for idiots if someone is a bit slow turning their lights of that's normal because we all are guilty of that I don't lose my cool I have though decided to react to the arrogant types who have no consideration for other road users and as I mentioned there's plenty of them around these days. And a reverse light is also good for tailgaters who keep persisting in sitting extremely close when you're doing the speed limit for no reason even after you have tapped the tail lights several times or slowed down a bit they sometime learn how dumb they are very quickly but then they usually go on to continue tailgating the car in front so I'm over the la di da approach which has never worked and do this when necessary to create a safety gap to protect myself and or family from dangerous drivers but for some reason I have been labelled as the dangerous one. So should we just encourage these dangerous drivers to keep driving dangerously and support them in their bid to try and kill someone or do you have a legitimate way of fixing the problem which I doubt you have because pulling off the road is indicating to most people that they are on to something that helps them get away with whatever they choose to do. A few yrs ago while doing 80 kph in an 80 zone I had an idiot tailgating me in a cruiser ute I tapped the brakes lights several times eventually slowed down a bit he got up beside me and swerved at me then he lost it going through a round about and mounted the gutter on the opposite side spinning out sideways and stopped on the grass but in some goodie goodie peoples eye I would be in the wrong because I should have pulled over and let him break the law and speed pass trying to kill himself and possible others.
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Follow Up By: Fab72 - Sunday, Mar 08, 2015 at 09:53

Sunday, Mar 08, 2015 at 09:53
Batt,
I respectfully disagree mate. I have a rear mounted reverse light but don't use it for the reasons you've listed.

There are that many drugged up psychos out there that even flicking on the reverse light for a second could push them over the edge. You don't know what sort of day they are having.

Just recently there was a case on the Eyre Peninsula of a guy shooting at a slow moving car. Yeah there is probably more to the story but nevertheless, I wouldn't subject my family to that. As a man and father, it's my job to protect my wife and children. If the sensible thing to do is pull over, then I'll do just that. It's not a case of letting the guy think he's got one over you, it's a case of "it aint worth it".

http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/news/south-australia/highway-to-hell-emergency-calls-released-by-court-reveal-road-rage-terror-on-eyre-hwy-near-kimba/story-fni6uo1m-1227002545532

Thinking that any sort of "duel" on the road has a winner and a loser suggests to me that both people are in the wrong frame of mind. It's a bit of bright light and an inconvenience. Not worth it.

Fab.
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Follow Up By: Fab72 - Sunday, Mar 08, 2015 at 09:55

Sunday, Mar 08, 2015 at 09:55
Sorry folks....used the wrong method to insert the link. opy the full link and paste if interested.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Sunday, Mar 08, 2015 at 11:09

Sunday, Mar 08, 2015 at 11:09
At last a voice of reason from raised by Fab.

Even so much as a toot or a gesture and you may find a madman accost you with a tyre lever at the next traffic lights.

It simply is not worth it for the sake of 'winning' and putting yourself and family at risk. It is not cowardice to let it pass, in fact is is a stance of conviction to be prudent.
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Batt's - Sunday, Mar 08, 2015 at 15:15

Sunday, Mar 08, 2015 at 15:15
Maybe we all should just stay at home where we feel safe in case the mail man drives past with an attitude it's a big scary world out there lol
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Reply By: Member - Outback Gazz - Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 17:08

Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 17:08
Ah Etiquette - I remember that, it used to be around in large amounts in the early days but seemed to die off in the late 60's and early 70's !!


Happy and safe travelling
( with dimmed lights )


Cheers

Gazz
AnswerID: 549464

Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 20:43

Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 20:43
Ah, yes Gazz. It disappeared along with the good music of that era.
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Member - Outback Gazz - Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 22:26

Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 22:26
Howdy Allan

Looks like we've finally agreed on something - ha ha ! Certainly can't beat the music of that era - those days a musician had to rely on his/her song writing skills and ability to play an instrument without assistance from computers etc. We could go on about dancing styles of that time as well but comparing a ballroom waltz or a Foxtrot to someone who was just zapped with a cattle prod isn't really a comparison.

It's funny really - I drive a very modern late model 4wd with bluetooth etc etc and plug my modern day Ipod into the usb port to listen to my favourite music of the 50's 60's and 70's - weird but good !

All the best

Gazz



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Follow Up By: Fab72 - Friday, Mar 06, 2015 at 20:02

Friday, Mar 06, 2015 at 20:02
The musicians made way for the electricians.
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Follow Up By: Alloy c/t - Sunday, Mar 08, 2015 at 17:06

Sunday, Mar 08, 2015 at 17:06
As did common sense , and the foot operated headlight 'dimmer' switch .
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Reply By: Member - Twocrowsdown - Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 17:27

Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 17:27
Oh, my favourite subject! We all have moments when we're a bit slow on the dip switch but I've noticed a lot people travelling dual carriageways in Perth don't seem to even have switches fitted. Really frustrates me! Fog lights, as mentioned before, is another issue the police seem to ignore. Keeping left unless overtaking? Ha, totally optional here in the west! Ok, I'm a professional driver and spend pretty much all my work time on the road and get to see a lot of this misbehaviour.
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Reply By: Rob J8 - Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 18:11

Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 18:11
Mostly city folk I reckon Cruiser.
I live in Busselton and know where there is plenty of bush in the median strip but lets face it, the Forrest Highway is pretty wide not too many spots where you get blinded.
Used to drive for South West Coach lines, you will get used to it.
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Follow Up By: Member - Cruiser74 - Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 18:20

Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 18:20
Thanks Rob,

I think some people just don't realise how powerful their spreads are as they don't really get to see them work from an oncoming perspective in a highway situation. Or maybe I just have really sensitive eyes!
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Follow Up By: Batt's - Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 19:11

Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 19:11
That's no excuse when people buy lights they mainly shop for something that's powerful it's mainly pure arrogance.
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Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 19:22

Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 19:22
Yeah, powerful alright!!!

Take HID for example. 35 watt examples are so bright you can see what's happening next week, but what do they do? Bring out 55 and 100 watt units as well.

Some dude thinks: "my halogens were 100 watt, I'll get some of them 100 w HID's" so we're all suffering from an ill informed discussion, on the highway.

Bob

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Can't remember most of it.

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Follow Up By: Roachie.kadina.sa.au - Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 19:57

Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 19:57
I've gone full circle....got rid of the various HIDs I'd tried over the years and now have a brilliant set of Fyrlyt 150s (halogen).

As for blinding other drivers on dual carriage ways....I often do a night mail run to Adelaide (from Kadina) and I get to travel back up Hwy 1 between Adelaide and Port Wakefield around 10 to 11 pm. This highway is separated by vegetation of varying density and there are times when it is quite okay to leave my high beam on even though I am conscious of oncoming traffic. They leave their high beam/spotties on too.

However, when the vegetation is sparse and it is obvious that the oncoming driver would be distracted, it is common sense to dip down. If, after I dip, the other driver doesn't, then I take that as my queue that he/she isn't bothered by the bright lights, so I put mine back up again......not out of spite or anger, simply because it is obvious that both of us are okay about the light they are 'seeing" from that oncoming vehicle.

As for vehicles approaching from behind who don't want to dip......well I have one of these "fancy new" vehicles that has ....wait for it....electric wing mirrors. Yes, I know, not many vehicles have this type of mirror (sarcasm flowing freely from my gob at this point!!!!). So, guess what I do??? I adjust all 3 mirrors so the light of the clown behind me doesn't bother me. Depending on my mood, I will either just let it be, or slow slightly so the clown can overtake me, then either blast him with MY lights (not likely really, but I have done it more than once), or I will just let him keep going if my mood is serene at the time.

Back a few years, when we went on long night trips in the 4WD club (say up the Stuart Highway to Woomera for example), we would tell each other in the convoy, to just leave their lights on high beam/spotties and we'd all adjust our mirrors. We were always about 500 meters apart anyway, so not as if we were tailgating each other like they show on those bloody 4WD Action magazine videos etc!!!

Anyway, it all comes down to common sense.

Roachie
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Follow Up By: Ron N - Saturday, Mar 07, 2015 at 14:31

Saturday, Mar 07, 2015 at 14:31
I've noticed a lot of cars today, with their weird-shaped headlights - and therefore, weird-shaped reflectors, throw a lot of their (increased) light to the sides of the road.

This exacerbates the glare problem, as compared to the older lights where the beam was concentrated on the lane.

I came down the Gt Eastern Hwy on a Friday night from Kalgoorlie to Perth recently (something I haven't done for a while), and ran into all the interstate trucks heading East.

I must admit, I was staggered at the brightness of the lighting on all the modern trucks.
It seems the last couple of years the truckies have ugraded everything to LED's and projector-style lights, and added enormous amounts of "chicken lights" (to borrow an American term - i.e., clearance lights), that just by themselves, light up the countryside like there's no tomorrow.

I was quite glad to get off the highway and away from the extra brightness of the truckies lights after 5 or 6 hours of putting up with them.

They probably don't notice the effect of brighter lights today, as they sit so high in their cabs.

Cheers, Ron.
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Reply By: Bob Y. - Qld - Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 19:13

Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 19:13
Probably one of the negatives of that type of highway, Craig. Something we don't have in western Qld. :-)

And then you have the "---- you, I'm okay, Jack" attitude of some people too. Maybe try high beam only, and only dip for the few considerate ones that dip for you?

The advent of LED & HID lamps, while aiding heavy transport & night travellers no end, has brought out the "fuIokJ" tuggers, who fit these lights to intentionally blind oncoming traffic as much as to improve night vision. And road rules don't help; they say you only have to dip headlights at 200 metres. Most of us would be legally blind by the time that limit was reached!!!

As Twocrowsdown said, we all have an occasional slow moment on the dipper switch, but some blokes are so slow, they're very likely fatigued big time, and shouldn't even be on the road. When they haven't dipped their lights, after an acceptable interval, I get on the UHF and say: "Mate, the dipper switch is on the column now, they stopped fitting them on the floor in the '60's" or words to that effect.

Stay safe,
Bob

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Can't remember most of it.

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Follow Up By: SDG - Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 20:47

Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 20:47
Better change that to the 70's. My 74 Torana had them lol
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Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 21:46

Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 21:46
Ha ha, was really just a guess, SDG.

'70 model Holden ute I had, still had it on the floor. Bought a '78 Datsun Skyline with everything on the steering column.

Bob

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Follow Up By: SDG - Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 21:58

Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 21:58
So much easier and cheaper to replace if needed
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Reply By: Gone Bush (WA) - Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 19:56

Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 19:56
Especially the low mounted foglights that people insist on using.

The only time someone will go blind because of someone ELSE'S wanking.

I'm glad I ain't too scared to be lazy
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Reply By: pop2jocem - Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 20:42

Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 20:42
Personally I can live with the fog lights usually mounted low on the bumper.

It's the 5,000,000 candle power spotties mounted on the roof rack in banks of 8 that I find a little intrusive.

Here's a tip, you only need to SEE 'roos, cows or whatever wandering around on the road.

You really don't need to cook them to somewhere between medium rare and well done with your wank wank i'm a macho man lights.
AnswerID: 549474

Follow Up By: Echucan Bob - Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 22:03

Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 22:03
Four extra driving lights, including the LED bar, is the legal limit.
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Follow Up By: Member - johnat - Saturday, Mar 07, 2015 at 22:07

Saturday, Mar 07, 2015 at 22:07
And, at least in NSW (and I suspect, in the rest of the country via the uniform road rules) they must be mounted at the FRONT of the vehicle, that means NOT on the roof rack, or the wanker bar at the front of the tub of your dual cab.
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Follow Up By: Fab72 - Sunday, Mar 08, 2015 at 10:01

Sunday, Mar 08, 2015 at 10:01
Johnat,
The law (SA law..... probably NOT uniform across all states) actually states "Infront of the driver" so technically the forward edge of a roof rack is legal in most instances. The dual cab tub location is clearly not.

In most cases this means somewhere forward of the area between the B and A pillars. It is clearly subjective given the driver's seating position is adjustable to a certain extent.

Fab.

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Follow Up By: Alloy c/t - Sunday, Mar 08, 2015 at 17:17

Sunday, Mar 08, 2015 at 17:17
You'l find that lights ,be they light bars or spot lights that are mounted on roof racks or behind the actual driving position are legal only for 'off road" use and technically should be wired independently , trouble is 'wankers' fit all the lights and then use them all the time cause they are scared of the dark.
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Reply By: Echucan Bob - Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 22:00

Thursday, Mar 05, 2015 at 22:00
Cruiser

I agree with you.

I'd say the Hume Hwy is the busiest country road with the highest concentration of professional drivers. They certainly dip when there is a vehicle approaching on the other side of the median strip.

The unfortunate aspect of 100W HIDs is that they blind people 20 km away. So in places like the Hay Plains you are turning off your spotties as soon as an oncoming vehicle appears on the horizon. Then with HID hi beams you still have to dip a few kms away from the oncoming driver. The road rules say 200 metres - yeah right.

Bob
AnswerID: 549480

Follow Up By: Member - Cruiser74 - Friday, Mar 06, 2015 at 10:39

Friday, Mar 06, 2015 at 10:39
Thanks Bob,

I won't lie I have a pair of IPF 900xs lights with a HID upgrade mounted on my bullbar but I don't have them switched on while highway driving between Margaret River and Perth unless it's very early in the morning during the country stretches and little to no traffic. I mainly use them on the tracks and when I'm out in really remote areas where you rarely see another vehicle. I love them and they make it a lot easier on the eyes plus you can see what might be lurking on the sides a lot better. I don't understand the need for them however for highway driving in relatively populated areas as you are having to constantly dip anyway for oncoming traffic and traffic you are approaching. Well, considerate people do anyway!
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Reply By: Slow one - Friday, Mar 06, 2015 at 05:50

Friday, Mar 06, 2015 at 05:50
Some mention you have to dip when you are 200 metres apart..

The important one is you are supposed to dip as soon as the oncoming vehicle drips his or her lights, no matter how far you are apart.

At least with the ones coming at you, you know the problem will go away quickly. It is the ones behind that cause me the most grief. On country roads, they will follow for many K's and let you show them where the road goes while lighting up your life for free.

At least you can gauge how tired a driver is by the time it takes them to dip their lights.
AnswerID: 549488

Follow Up By: Michaeljp - Friday, Mar 06, 2015 at 15:26

Friday, Mar 06, 2015 at 15:26
I thought the 200m rule was from someone coming from behind should dip their light 200m from the car in front, and dip your light as soon as you see someone in front coming the other way.
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Friday, Mar 06, 2015 at 16:18

Friday, Mar 06, 2015 at 16:18
In Victoria it is 300 metres or when the oncoming vehicle dips its lights, whichever comes first.

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Follow Up By: Slow one - Friday, Mar 06, 2015 at 16:28

Friday, Mar 06, 2015 at 16:28
I have just grabbed the WA rules as they came up first. Page 52 on this
LINK
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Friday, Mar 06, 2015 at 18:19

Friday, Mar 06, 2015 at 18:19
I lost an argument about his a few years ago, that was when I found that it was 300 metres, i have just double checked & it appears that it has now been reduced to 200 metres in Victoria. With headlights beng brighter than ever now, it defies logic!

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Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Friday, Mar 06, 2015 at 19:05

Friday, Mar 06, 2015 at 19:05
Suppose they have to set a standard, at 200-300M or whatever, but it all comes down to common courtesy. That is, if courtesy is still that common?

Bob



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Follow Up By: Shaker - Friday, Mar 06, 2015 at 22:40

Friday, Mar 06, 2015 at 22:40
Are you suggesting that drivers should indicate to disclose their intentions to other drivers, or God forbid, position their vehicle to allow others to pass when making a turn? Surely not!

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Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Saturday, Mar 07, 2015 at 10:43

Saturday, Mar 07, 2015 at 10:43
No....no, Shaker. Merely in relation to use of very bright lights, at night.

After watching the antics of the general motoring public on that "Dash Cam Owners" site, that Michelle linked in Cruiser's previous thread, I don't think courtesy, common sense or even ability count any more. It seems like many of us are just accidents going somewhere to happen!

Bob

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Reply By: Sand Man (SA) - Friday, Mar 06, 2015 at 07:37

Friday, Mar 06, 2015 at 07:37
I have the best solution.
I don't drive at night:-)

Had a set of spotties on my previous vehicle. They were excellent as far as illumination goes but on a trip to the ExplorOz gathering at Innamincka one year, I "limped" into camp with a drooping spotlight that had broken at the mount, from a combination of corrugated roads and metal fatigue over time. The second one did the same some weeks later and although I purchased replacement housings, spotties on my replacement vehicle was not even considered worthwhile.
Generally we are set up at camp before sundown and on the rare occasion where I need to drive at night, I just lower my speed and make do with the standard high beam lights on the Colorado.
Works for me!

Bill


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Follow Up By: Member - Cruiser74 - Friday, Mar 06, 2015 at 10:51

Friday, Mar 06, 2015 at 10:51
Yes, that is definitely the best solution and one I use when I can but unfortunately for me I have to commute from Margaret River to Perth and back once a week for work and the only feasible time for me to leave home is 3am and then on the return stretch I am leaving Perth around 8pm (not on the same day). It's a 3 hour drive and especially now coming into winter is all during hours of darkness so this is something I will be contending with a lot I'm afraid!
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Follow Up By: Fab72 - Friday, Mar 06, 2015 at 20:21

Friday, Mar 06, 2015 at 20:21
G'day Sandman,
I'm the opposite. With kids that travel better when sleeping and towing a van/camper, I find travelling at night suits me better.

I can plod along at 80-90 without holding up traffic and can avoid the "are we there yet?" questions?

My Pajero has (in total) 2x 120W standard highbeams, 2x100W halogen spreads mounted where fog lights would normally be but angled to illuminate the sides of the road, 2x 55W Lightforce 240 Blitz with HID conversions, 4 x 55W HID's on the roof rack and 2x 35W LED lights mounted on the front corners of the roof rack to light up the sides of the road too.

When travelling on the highways etc, at most I'll use my highbeam and the Lightforce's. The others don't get a run until we've hit the bush tracks. Typical usage would be heading from Parachilna to the gorge where it's windy and has steep drop off in areas, or along places like the Birdsville track where stock wanders.

All the lights are independently switched in banks and not wired directly to the highbeam switch. This way, they are actually classified as "work lights" and don't come under the same legislation as driving lights....well at least not in South Oz.

I can't wait until the kids are old enough to stay home so I can see more than what's directly in front of me.

Fab.
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Reply By: Idler Chris - Vic - Friday, Mar 06, 2015 at 21:52

Friday, Mar 06, 2015 at 21:52
Cruiser you are very lucky. The police have a good little trick when things are a bit slow to follow a vehicle with lights on high beam and not pass. What they are hoping is you will speed up to get away from them and then they have got you for speeding. Be warned.
What other people think of me is none of my business.
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Reply By: Drew - Karratha - Friday, Mar 06, 2015 at 22:04

Friday, Mar 06, 2015 at 22:04
Thank you for posting the exact same thing in the same location that really gives me the sh1ts!!! Now living near Australind I frequently drive back from Perth at night. MOST people (certainly not a few, or some) leave their high beams / spotties on, and no matter of flashing make them turn them off. It is annoying and the glare is dangerous. If only the cops could set up some sort of an 'inconsiderate a-hole' trap (similar to a RBT, but better...)....
AnswerID: 549536

Follow Up By: Member - Cruiser74 - Saturday, Mar 07, 2015 at 15:20

Saturday, Mar 07, 2015 at 15:20
Thanks Drew,

Good to know I'm not alone on this one. It is definitely worse in that stretch between you and Perth particularly on the Forrest Highway. I guess the best thing to do is ensure we can be as safe as possible ourselves. Don't drive fatigued and be as courteous as possible to other drivers even if perhaps they don't deserve our courtesy. We're all trying to get somewhere, to our homes, jobs, families and partners!
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Reply By: Ron N - Saturday, Mar 07, 2015 at 14:22

Saturday, Mar 07, 2015 at 14:22
There's only one thing worse than idiots who have no idea their lights are on high beam and blinding you - and that's the idiots who drive around the city with NO LIGHTS ON AT ALL!!!

God knows, I see at least half a dozen of these idiots every night, with no lights on!
Where do these imbeciles get their licences from??
Surely, glancing at your dashboard every 20 seconds gives you a clue that you have no lighting??
Obviously, they look at nothing inside the vehicle as soon as they crank up and drive off.

I pulled out of a T-junction, turning right, one night a couple of years ago, with a building on the RH corner, blocking my view.
I pulled out cautiously from the stop sign - only to have one of these unlit imbeciles barrel out of the gloom at 60kmh, on my right - only just turning his lights on, as he was 15M away!!

I gunned the car to avoid him, and he swerved to avoid me! I felt like chasing the stupid bastard down, I was so angry!
However, we all know how pointless that is.

I'm convinced we need some seriously upgraded driver training - the same as piloting involves endorsements for every plane you fly, and for every flying situation (visual or instrument flying).
We need some serious upgrading in the training for driving at night, and the correct use of lights!!

Don't even get me started on the imbeciles who don't even know what fog lights are for, and who drive around with them on, continuously!!

Cheers, Ron.
AnswerID: 549553

Follow Up By: Member - johnat - Saturday, Mar 07, 2015 at 22:15

Saturday, Mar 07, 2015 at 22:15
"Don't even get me started on the imbeciles who don't even know what fog lights are for, and who drive around with them on, continuously!!"
They would be the ones who have bought a vehicle with "fog" lights that the salesperson told them were "driving" lights, so they don't have to abide by the rule that quite clearly states that fog lights are ONLY to be used when the use of other lighting is ineffective - ie in (wait for it ...) F O G. OMFG, what a radical concept, use the lights for their actual function, not as decoration!
I have even had one person tell me that their fog lights were not wired to the switch, so the couldn't turn them off! WTF?
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FollowupID: 834978

Follow Up By: Ron N - Sunday, Mar 08, 2015 at 00:33

Sunday, Mar 08, 2015 at 00:33
Johnat - I'm convinced many people don't even know what half the switches on the dash and steering column, actually do.
It's made worse today by the sheer amount of electronics in vehicles.
Add to that, the sheer annoyance of multiple indecipherable symbols for controls and indicator lights.

The Missus' new Camry Atara has no less than 32 warning lights or indicators scattered around the dash and instrument panel!

I have to admit, the new Camry had me beat on switch controls for the lights, until I actually switched all the switches and got in and out multiple times, until I'd confirmed what worked what. The symbols do nothing for me.

It has automatic high beam headlights, plus fog lights. Plus it has 4 positions on the light switch stalk - Off, Park lights, All lights, and AUTO (yes, it actually has WORDS here!).
Just rotating the switch to AUTO merely turns the lights on automatically when you turn the ignition on.

The Auto high beam is selected by turning the switch to "AUTO", and pushing the indicator/light switch stalk, forward! It's deactivated by pulling the stalk back towards you.

The fog lights are on an inner ring on the stalk, and could be easily missed - although there is an indicator light on the dash, for when they're on!

I just find it amazing that so many people take so little time to familiarise themselves with their vehicle and its controls.

I guess it's not helped by the mind-boggling size of owner manuals today.
The Camry manual, which is supposed to be a pretty basic car, is 380 pages alone.

I drove a VW motorhome based on the VW Crafter 50 truck for a couple of weeks in 2012, and there were TWO monstrous manuals for that, that must have run to 600 pages!

The sheer amount of dash indicator light symbols in that rig was mind-boggling. I reckon even people driving them regularly would still only know what half the indicator symbols meant.

Cheers, Ron.
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FollowupID: 834984

Follow Up By: nickb - Wednesday, Mar 11, 2015 at 14:19

Wednesday, Mar 11, 2015 at 14:19
Some vehicles have dashboards that light up whenever the ignition is on regardless of headlights on or off. I got caught out once in a newish Hiace, pulled out of the street which has good street lighting so didn't notice my lights were off!! Took me about 30secs to realise though...
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FollowupID: 835185

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