Canning Stock route/Gazetted Rd

Submitted: Sunday, Mar 08, 2015 at 13:11
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Hi All,Asking for a friend.Is the Canning a gazetted rd and are you covered by insurance should your car burn,need to be abandoned ect.I can not give info on their insurance ect.Pls be positive in reply's.Thank you all.

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Reply By: The Explorer - Sunday, Mar 08, 2015 at 13:43

Sunday, Mar 08, 2015 at 13:43
Hello

The Canning Stock Route proper (not the track itself) is a gazetted stock route. The track used by travelers etc (also referred to as the Canning Stock Route, but not really) is not specifically gazetted in anyway, though it does fall within the gazetted stock route boundary over much of its length (but not all). No idea how this affects insurance.

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Greg
I sent one final shout after him to stick to the track, to which he replied “All right,” That was the last ever seen of Gibson - E Giles 23 April 1874

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Follow Up By: equinox - Sunday, Mar 08, 2015 at 13:59

Sunday, Mar 08, 2015 at 13:59
According to Phil Bianchi (Work Completed, Canning 2013) page 403 the Canning was never a permanent stock route reserve.
It was only ever a temporary reserve, "long since lapsed and reverted to unallocated crown land".


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Follow Up By: The Explorer - Sunday, Mar 08, 2015 at 14:12

Sunday, Mar 08, 2015 at 14:12
What would he know :)

My mistake...the boundaries of the stock route are still shown in state cadastral data so I was making an assumption. Just had a quick flick through data attributes and most sections are indeed shown as "crown" with some areas being "reserve" though one section is shown as "stock route" but not sure if this is current or if in fact means it is gazetted as a stock route or if it means something else. Either way the track isn't a gazetted road (bit still dont know how this affects insurance).

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Greg
I sent one final shout after him to stick to the track, to which he replied “All right,” That was the last ever seen of Gibson - E Giles 23 April 1874

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Follow Up By: Ron N - Sunday, Mar 08, 2015 at 21:42

Sunday, Mar 08, 2015 at 21:42
Landgate (W.A.) runs a Crown Reserves Register, which enables one to check on the precise status of Crown Reserves.

This info is available under the Landgate SLIP system (State Land Information System), for which you have to be registered, via the SLIP enabler.

Once registered, you are entitled to peruse some data on the SLIP system, but not all.
To access the full range of data and services on SLIP, you have to pay for a subscription service.

The SLIP Enabler currently provides access to over 350 datasets from over 20 government agencies.
However, you can only access the following info via a paid subscription;

Administration Boundaries
Cadastre
Geodetic
Aerial Imagery
Tenure
Topography
Crown Reserves
Road Centreline

So, as you can see, any info on the CSR Reserve status is held within the subscription section of Landgate, and you will have to fork out to view it.

Cheers, Ron.
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Follow Up By: Ron N - Sunday, Mar 08, 2015 at 21:44

Sunday, Mar 08, 2015 at 21:44
EDIT - Sorry, the line should read, "SLIP (State Land Information Platform)" ...
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Follow Up By: Member - John Baas (WA) - Tuesday, Mar 10, 2015 at 21:30

Tuesday, Mar 10, 2015 at 21:30
Free SLIP data is available for viewing on GoogleEarth from Landgate on their 'Locate' page. You just need to download the KML file on to your PC; then open GE and then open 'Locate' from the File menu. You may need to wait a few minutes for the layers to become viewable.

I've found it very useful and easy to use - just 'check' the layers you wish to see.

Landgate 'Locate' Page

Cheers.
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Reply By: Ron N - Sunday, Mar 08, 2015 at 13:56

Sunday, Mar 08, 2015 at 13:56
Grundle - The CSR is only a Gazetted Stock Route, it is not a Gazetted Road.
It is not maintained in any way, and it meanders back and forth across the actual Stock Route Reserve, following no designated, surveyed, alignment.
In many places there are multiple tracks, as vehicle operators have taken alternative routes because of flooded sections, boggy sections, or other hazards.

For all intents and purposes, it is a track that is defined as "operating in an off-road environment" and it's not covered by any standard insurance policy that has strict definitions of "roads".

Your friends would either need to contact an insurance company that is prepared to insure vehicles operating in an "off-road environment", and arrange specific insurance cover for their CSR trek - or talk to their current insurer, to see if they are prepared to advance additional cover, at additional cost, for their CSR trek.

Cheers, Ron.
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Reply By: Member - Megan and Kevin D (AC - Sunday, Mar 08, 2015 at 22:30

Sunday, Mar 08, 2015 at 22:30
You could ask the insurance company about this. I'd be interested to know the company's response. All the best. Megan
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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Monday, Mar 09, 2015 at 08:31

Monday, Mar 09, 2015 at 08:31
GIO gave us an assurance that we are covered "off road" and on "non gazetted" tracks etc. Luckily the statement has never been tested, so it may have been a sales "pork pie".
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Follow Up By: Member - John (Vic) - Monday, Mar 09, 2015 at 15:59

Monday, Mar 09, 2015 at 15:59
Normally if your legally allowed to be there, your covered.

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Follow Up By: TomH - Monday, Mar 09, 2015 at 16:19

Monday, Mar 09, 2015 at 16:19
The only correct answer is the one given by the insurance company.

To say if you are legally allowed somewhere is very misleading.

You are legally allowed on the likes of Ivanhoe crossing but if its in flood when you cross it and you get swept away I doubt you will be covered.
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Follow Up By: andoland - Monday, Mar 09, 2015 at 16:21

Monday, Mar 09, 2015 at 16:21
Agree John. I've asked the question of my insurance company regarding where I am insured and for what events and their answer was that you are insured wherever you are (i.e. gazetted road or not, public or private property, in the middle of a creek, etc) as long as you are not doing something illegal.

I'm not sure why there is a view that insurance only covers gazetted roads.
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Follow Up By: Member - John (Vic) - Monday, Mar 09, 2015 at 21:35

Monday, Mar 09, 2015 at 21:35
Comprehensive insurance covers your loss and liability to others if the damage was caused by your legal actions

If we used Tom's example then nobody would have coverage for any situation to which you caused your own damage.
Example, it's raining and the road is slippery, you chose to drive knowing it was wet and had a prang, using Tom's example you would have no coverage.
If Ivanhoe Crossing was closed by authorities and you are not permitted to pass a closed crossing sign or gate and got swept away, then you were not legally allowed to be there.
Now you may have insurance issues and rightly so.

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Follow Up By: Member - Megan and Kevin D (AC - Monday, Mar 09, 2015 at 22:39

Monday, Mar 09, 2015 at 22:39
In response to my own comment above (!), I think if you try to get a definitive answer from an insurer they will tell you to make a claim and then it will be assessed. That way you'll find out!
Megan
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Follow Up By: andoland - Tuesday, Mar 10, 2015 at 08:36

Tuesday, Mar 10, 2015 at 08:36
Megan I rang my insurance company before a trip once and asked them the question. They were more than happy to advise what I was covered for. I gave them a bunch of examples (and specifically the example that TomH used above) and they said yes to everything. Of course another persons cover may not be the same as mine but my point is you don't have to make a claim to find out, although at that point you will get a definitive answer!
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Follow Up By: TTTSA - Tuesday, Mar 10, 2015 at 14:35

Tuesday, Mar 10, 2015 at 14:35
My Policy clearly states that I am covered within the "Whole of Australia"

Cheers
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Follow Up By: Member - Megan and Kevin D (AC - Tuesday, Mar 10, 2015 at 16:25

Tuesday, Mar 10, 2015 at 16:25
Thanks for all those responses. When I selected the Thanks button I got a message saying that I needed to log on - which I am - so am not sure why that didn't work. Megan
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Reply By: Phil B (WA) - Monday, Mar 09, 2015 at 15:33

Monday, Mar 09, 2015 at 15:33
Hi folks - sorry I've been off the air with a computer glitch.

As Alan says the CSR is no longer a gazetted anything - it lapsed soon after construction. I got this info from Dept of Lands and from Landgate. Yet many still say (including Native Title determinations) that there is a gazetted route.

cheers


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Reply By: Ron N - Tuesday, Mar 10, 2015 at 00:06

Tuesday, Mar 10, 2015 at 00:06
Insurance is a minefield and it ALWAYS pays to check with your insurer, and read your policy document T&C's very carefully, to see what is covered, and what is not.
Some insurers are very particular about what circumstances they will insure, particularly the "budget insurers".

The essence of insurance is "good faith". You tell the insurer in good faith, all the insured conditions you are operating under, and they accept claims in good faith, providing you are not making a fraudulent claim.

However - T&C's are quite clear today, they are written in terms that lay people can understand - and insurance companies stick to those T&C's.
So, read all the T&C's in your policy document, and if there is still any doubt in your mind, call your insurer and ask if specific conditions that you are intending to go into, that are not mentioned or not clear to you in the document, are covered.

Many of the references to "gazetted roads" in insurance policies, are where the insurance covers recovery of a damaged, inoperable vehicle (i.e., rolled-over).
Naturally, the cost of recovering a damaged, inoperable vehicle, from halfway along the CSR is horrendous - and no insurance company is going to want to pick up the tab on a claim for what they consider to be an event outside the scope of their average recovery costs in settled areas.

Cheers, Ron.
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Reply By: get outmore - Tuesday, Mar 10, 2015 at 22:35

Tuesday, Mar 10, 2015 at 22:35
You need to read your product disclosure statement
this tell you where your not covered
...everwhere else you are covered
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