Tyre Deflators - recommendations?

Submitted: Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 14:11
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Hi there,

What's a good type of deflator that will last for a while?
Looking at ebay there's some cheap ones but they don't look too flash.

I'm thinking of the ones that will stop deflating at a certain (maybe preset) pressure.

Cheers
Alan

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Reply By: TomH - Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 14:33

Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 14:33
Staun are the accepted best. They can be set to a required pressure

I used a Bushranger gauge that had the ability to deflate as well simply by pushing a piece on the line to the gauge
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Follow Up By: TomH - Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 14:34

Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 14:34
Did you look in the shop at these


Tyre Deflator
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Follow Up By: equinox - Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 14:54

Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 14:54
Thanks Tom
Stauns look OK and are reasonably priced - I have now looked at the ones at EO shop (4x4 Equip), they are dearer and a bit bulkier.


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Reply By: Les - PK Ranger - Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 16:09

Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 16:09
Sorry, I have to vote against Stauns, the work fine, but aren't all that practical in many situations.

For the record I had / still have a set of genuine Stauns, and used them a lot for initial trips away.
I found doing sand driving, all good, would have them set for 18psi, and if I needed to go lower, would simply deflate wiht tyre pencil gauge nipple n the back a few more psi or whatever was needed.

Then, when doing Flinders terrain and SA outback track type trips, I set 2 of the Stauns to 24psi, and similarly aired down another couple of pis if needed manually.

Ok, so work fine, but starting to defeat the purpose of walking around for a particular pressure and screwing onto each of the 4 tyre valves in turn, then by the time you finished the 4th one the first was near ready to come off.

Eventually after seeing them used often, I went to an ARB EZ trye deflator, $60 with a little off the price.

Since then, a whole lot of others have flooded the market, and most likely out of same or similar Chinese factories, many of these cheaper ebay ones are in use by fellow 4WDrs without issue.

You can simply air down so much faster with the valve removal, and adjust to precise psi so much easier, as once you have been 4WDing a while you get to realise there is no perfect tyre pressure, you need to adjust up and down fairly often for different terrains and surfaces.
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Follow Up By: Member - Outback Gazz - Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 17:03

Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 17:03
I'm with Les on this

Cheers

Gazz
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Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 18:19

Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 18:19
Me too
My Stauns have not come out of the glovebox for about 3 years
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Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 18:45

Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 18:45
Lol Alby, mine too were delegated to the glovebox for years, just in case needed.
However a few weeks ago I had a big clean up in the glovebox, centre console, etc, and sadly the are now in the storage box of gear in the backyard shed.

If anyone is coonsidering buying Stauns, definitely go for the 6 - 30psi ones, much more flexible for sand driving . . . then again, you don't won't normally have the ability to adjust them in the field, so the 15 - 55psi would cover a normal sand setting too.

I would recommend getting the GENUINE Staun brand though, wouldn't trust the knock offs to be as accurate as the Stauns were.
Still, just checked online a few places, the best you cna find them for is on Wild Earth $73.50 + some shipping . . . or wait for Supercheap to have a 25% of sale and get them for around $67.50 . . . OR better still, request my email and you can have mine for $50, free post Aust wide !!! Lol.
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Follow Up By: Member - Judy and Laurie - Tuesday, Jun 02, 2015 at 17:01

Tuesday, Jun 02, 2015 at 17:01
We are with Les as well , found the ARB good for all situations
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Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Tuesday, Jun 02, 2015 at 17:57

Tuesday, Jun 02, 2015 at 17:57
Hmm, I don't think I'm going to sell my Stauns by the looks :D
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Reply By: Sand Man (SA) - Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 16:47

Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 16:47
I have two pairs of Staun Tyre Deflators, which I have had for some 10 years.
One set is set for 28psi and the other for 18psi.
I placed a drop of red paint on one set to identify the lower settings I use for sand driving.
The higher set pressure (28psi) is for normal off road driving.
With four of them, you progressively screw one on to each wheel and pull the centre pin.
By the time I have gone around the car, the first has reached its set pressure.
All very simple and practical.

I also couldn't help myself and purchased an ARB EZ Deflator.
you have to screw it onto the valve stem, then undo and remove the valve with a specially designed knurled screw attachment, watch the pressure gauge and screw the valve back in.
Doing this for four or six tyres is somewhat time consuming and I haven't deployed this Deflator since first trying it out.

The Stauns are the best devices in my opinion.
Some folk set two at a higher and two at a lower pressure, which takes longer to deflate the tyres to the desired setting, but you only need to purchase one set.

Bill


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Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 17:19

Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 17:19
I could go along with you somewhat, except you really need 2 sets of 4 Stauns to be really practical when setting pressures for sand and general off road.

This topic will end up with two fairly divided camps on Stauns and EZ type deflators.
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Follow Up By: equinox - Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 19:34

Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 19:34
Hi Bill,

Which would you think would be faster over 4 tyres - without rushing I mean...

Cheers

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Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 19:54

Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 19:54
Les,

I misquoted. (Must be the Red I'm sipping.)

I don't have two pairs. (Duh)
I have two sets of four.
Bill


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Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 20:03

Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 20:03
Equinox,

I haven't timed the process, but nothing could be easier than a set of four Staun deflators.

As I said, by the time the fourth wheel has had the Staun installed and activated, the first wheel is ready, at least when going from highway pressure to 28psi which I run on the dirt.

Obviously, airing down to 18psi for sand will take longer, but I haven't experienced any noticable delay.
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Follow Up By: Member - John Baas (WA) - Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 20:43

Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 20:43
Hi Alan.

I've got both Stauns and the ARB.

The Stauns would definitely be faster if you wanted to get to the pre-set pressure. However, I rarely found that I actually wanted the pre-set pressure and wanted to finish either higher or lower.

Being able to be flexible with end pressures has led to me always choosing the ARB in the field; particularly now that I can't even remember what my Staun pre-set pressure is :-).

Cheers.
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Follow Up By: Dave(NSW) - Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 23:35

Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 23:35
I have both Stauns & ARB ones to.
The problem with the Stauns is it only takes a gain of sand or dirt and they will keep deflating, Nothing worse than having to get a compressor out to reinflate again.
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Sunday, May 31, 2015 at 13:16

Sunday, May 31, 2015 at 13:16
I have both Stauns & ARB, but would highly recommend a short twig approx 5mm in diameter!

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Follow Up By: Michael H9 - Monday, Jun 01, 2015 at 07:24

Monday, Jun 01, 2015 at 07:24
Another vote for Stauns. I have one set, 2 are set for gravel and 2 set for sand. I usually beat most others deflating their tyres without the need to squat next to the tyre watching a gauge. The number of times I have needed to modify the pressure due to conditions is quite low. There is no right or wrong in this discussion, just how you prefer the air gets out of your tyres....a first world problem indeed. :-)
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Reply By: Member - ross s - Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 17:26

Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 17:26
I also started with the Staun deflators but found the arb one a lot more user friendly, quicker and equally well made. Once the valve is unscrewed its air down in no time and to what ever pressure you want. The Stauns will get to your preset then you may need the pressure gauge if you want a bit less. You dont really need four of them also as mentioned above.
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Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 19:00

Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 19:00
Another convert to EZ type deflator hey ?
It's not easy to do once you've used the EZ.

But I have to say, to have 2 pairs (set of 4) Stauns set to 2 different pressures (say 18 and 24/6 etc) is not very practical.
If you have to remove them to deflate more with another tool, you might as well use the EZ to start with.

Heck, if you can't remove them without then having to even gauge test pressure, they are a bit of a waste of time.
They are easy to preset to within 1psi, every time.

Remove cap and screw them on going around all 4 wheels in turn, then usually simply walk around again straight away to remove and refit each cap in turn.
Anything more than that is a waste of the only Staun advantage there is.
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Reply By: Member - John (Vic) - Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 18:59

Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 18:59
Al I used the Stauns for quite awhile but found them a little hit and miss, mostly because they stuck open occasionally and kept deflating.

I now use these Ferret Deflators and have found them really good.
Simple to use, just count out the seconds to reach the desired pressure.
Found it to be a pretty accurate method and very quick.

They are hand made by a bloke in WA and pretty cheap at $30- each.



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Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 19:06

Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 19:06
John, I don't mind the look or method of the Ferrets, although I've never used them, or seen anyone using them.

So, you take tyre pressure with gauge, put it on each tyre in turn, open it up, count 1 sec per psi you want to drop, remove it, gauge test again, if it needs readjusting a little you do that with the gauge nipple ??

Will stick to EZ in that case, but the thing I like about the Ferret method, is I use the same 1psi a second rule when using the EZ deflator, it works as pretty well, usually only have to do the collar slide twice, the last one to tweak that 1/2 or 1 psi to finish.
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Follow Up By: Mick O - Sunday, May 31, 2015 at 00:18

Sunday, May 31, 2015 at 00:18
I'm using the key to the Tojo. Simply stick the end in to the tyre valve and then count the seconds it takes to reach the desired pressure and repeat on all four tyres.

If you've got you're mate along, you give him the spare keys to work the other side with and count out together (if it's outback Al Kennedy, you give him a bit of help because math was never a strong point for him ;-)

It works really well and only cost me $62,000 for both sets of keys!

Cheers Mick

(P.S. Jaydub has the ARB deflater and I have a generic one....they are great!)
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Follow Up By: Member - John (Vic) - Sunday, May 31, 2015 at 01:17

Sunday, May 31, 2015 at 01:17
That's about it Lez.

That's works until you bend the key Mick :(

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Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Sunday, May 31, 2015 at 09:34

Sunday, May 31, 2015 at 09:34
Or you have one of those push button start models lol
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Sunday, May 31, 2015 at 10:24

Sunday, May 31, 2015 at 10:24
Alby, don't those fancy pants push button start models adjust the tyre pressure automatically by sensing road conditions?
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Reply By: Idler Chris - Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 20:59

Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 20:59
My Stauns have not left my shed for at least 8 years for the same reasons mentioned by others. The ARB ezy deflator is my choice when I wish to dump a lot of air. On the highway I run pressures of around 50 front 60 rear, so when I hit the dirt I have a fair bit of air to get rid of. As you travel the conditions change so the ideal pressure change. I have a internal tyre monitoring system and with information from them and track conditions I will make pressure adjustments. For these changes I poke a pencil in the valve and I have a rough idea of how long it will take to get to my target pressure. There after at each stop I may do some fine tuning, all very quick and easy. I have an Air-on-Board motor driven compressor with a hose outlet in the middle of my cargo barrier with a curly air hose always connected and just sitting on top of things in the back. This will reach all wheels so any upwards adjustments are just as quick as the downwards adjustments. I find this setup easy and simple so I am now not tempted to drive on hoping the conditions will change but never seem too.
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Reply By: Member - Leigh (Vic) - Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 22:52

Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 22:52
After a decade with the Stauns I gave them away to a novice. Found they were too sticky and lost confidence in them. The ARB unit lets me air down to precisely the pressure I want and for large tyres it is very quick. Suggest you avoid cheap copies too.
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Reply By: 906 - Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 23:31

Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 23:31
ARB ez , easy fast simple
Colin
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Reply By: 322 - Sunday, May 31, 2015 at 00:40

Sunday, May 31, 2015 at 00:40
I have Stauns and an Ezy Deflator. The Stauns just sit in the glove box now unless I'm going on very soft sand. I have them set to 18psi.
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Reply By: Member - Boobook - Sunday, May 31, 2015 at 07:00

Sunday, May 31, 2015 at 07:00
I gave up on my stauns. They never set the same pressure twice, and takes ages.

Maybe not exactly what you are looking for, but after reviewing my whole air pressure setup following my ARB gauge being 10PSI wrong and costing me a set of tyres, I bought one of these.

Automatic tyre inflator / deflator

It works like the new service station ones. Just set the pressure you want ( manually or from 2 adjustable preset pressures), connect on tyre and drink beer. It beeps and stops when it inflates or deflates to the pressure you select. You can even over ride for inflating completely flat tyres or reseating. Deflating takes just over a minute.

It is individually calibrated, ( mine is within 0.3 PSI) and for the first time I have a gauge that agrees with my TPMS exactly, and I have confidence that the tyres are what I think they are.

BTW it is smaller than the dimensions on the spec page. It is 300mm x 100 x 90. About $280 if you shop around.

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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Sunday, May 31, 2015 at 10:37

Sunday, May 31, 2015 at 10:37
Oooooh, that's noice Boobook. I think the contest is over! lol
Cheers
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Follow Up By: equinox - Sunday, May 31, 2015 at 13:56

Sunday, May 31, 2015 at 13:56
Wow that one is a bit different

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Follow Up By: Member - Boobook - Sunday, May 31, 2015 at 15:53

Sunday, May 31, 2015 at 15:53
I've now used it a few time and nuthin is close.

If you are member of Lcool, there is a group buy.

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Follow Up By: Kumunara (NT) - Tuesday, Jun 02, 2015 at 11:48

Tuesday, Jun 02, 2015 at 11:48
Boobook

What is the cost and where can you buy them?
Looks good!!!
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Reply By: Member - Alastair D (NSW) - Sunday, May 31, 2015 at 07:48

Sunday, May 31, 2015 at 07:48
About 7 years ago I bought a set of Stauns and set them to 24psi which is a value I seem to often use. Soon after I was given a different brand (can't remember) for Christmas. I tried using them for a while but often found I wanted a slightly different pressure. I haven't used them in years and continue to use the tyre pressure gauge which connects to the end of the hose for my built in compressor.

It has a lever which you press one way to inflate and the other to deflate. When I want to air down I use it without plugging it on the hose. This is relatively quick and easy and I can go to whatever pressure I feel appropriate. It takes no longer to air down than using the Stauns by the time you go to each wheel remove cap, put them on and then repeat to take off and cap on. I actually don't trust them and always checked the pressure anyway. Mostly they were right but sometimes they were still high by a psi or 3.

I guess the Stauns are still in the vehicle side pocket but not sure.

Buy a quality gauge that can deflate and take te time to look at the scenery - what's the rush that a few minutes difference will make?

Now I wait for incoming !!
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Reply By: TomH - Sunday, May 31, 2015 at 10:32

Sunday, May 31, 2015 at 10:32
I used one of these Saves having two things to carry

http://www.bushranger.com.au/3_in_1_tyregauge.php#.VWpWSEbBaH4
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Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Sunday, May 31, 2015 at 12:21

Sunday, May 31, 2015 at 12:21
Yeah Tom, my air compressor lead had that sort of deflator on it too, was a bit of a pain inflating sometimes (accidentally set on deflate) so I removed it from the air up line.

Ok if you're not in a hurry, the valve obviously isn't removed for deflation, just pushes in the valve tip to air down slowly.

Times PSI Change examples from their website info in your link.

31" x 10.5"
30 to 15 PSI - 1 Min. 55 Sec.

33" x 12.5"
30 to 15 PSI - 2 Min. 30 Sec.

The EZ deflator type tool drops a psi / second, air down would be about 15 - 20 seconds respectively with those 2 examples above.
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Reply By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Sunday, May 31, 2015 at 12:23

Sunday, May 31, 2015 at 12:23
Well Alan, you asked......"What's a good type of deflator that will last for a while?"

Looks like the answer is Staun. After all, there are dozens that have lasted in the glovebox for YEARS. All still like new!
Mine included. LOL
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: equinox - Sunday, May 31, 2015 at 13:58

Sunday, May 31, 2015 at 13:58
Hi Allan,
I noticed there seems to be a bit of a pattern there :-)

Thanks to all for your answers - I think I will pop into ARB after work this week.

Cheers
Alan

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Follow Up By: Member - Outback Gazz - Sunday, May 31, 2015 at 15:23

Sunday, May 31, 2015 at 15:23
......"What's a good type of deflator that will last for a while?"

Looks like the answer is Staun. After all, there are dozens that have lasted in the glovebox for YEARS. All still like new!
Mine included. LOL

Allan B - That's gold !!

Cheers

Gazz
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Reply By: pop2jocem - Sunday, May 31, 2015 at 21:27

Sunday, May 31, 2015 at 21:27
I must be a bit past it or maybe just easy to please.

I have found the little valve depressor on my PBL pencil type pressure gauge works a treat.

Then again I have never entered in the Paris-Dakar rally or any like event so time hasn't been all that critical.

Cheers
Pop
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Reply By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Monday, Jun 01, 2015 at 11:22

Monday, Jun 01, 2015 at 11:22
For those 4WD drivers who have not quite 'got-it-all' here is the ultimate inflation/deflation system....See it here.
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Member - mike g2 - Monday, Jun 01, 2015 at 12:46

Monday, Jun 01, 2015 at 12:46
Like it! ...does this beat all the discourse on manual methods and time taken?.
personally, I've used a ARB deflator with gauge many times , yes takes time down and to pump up at end of your sand/beach run.
Was gunna suggest getting hold of the auto tyre air pressure system that runs on the hummer ? possible to adapt and put it in to his .

was on a beach run once in group with his greenhornguy who had a new hummer, let his tyres down but lost a valve!.. no problem- use the valve in the spare. ..on starting up, black box controller sensed no pressure in 1 tyre ( the spare) and locked up the whole car. had to disconnect his uni joint to tow him out 15k of bush track to the road for assist to arrive! so much for electronics. ( makes for good friday funny)

MG.
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Reply By: Member - Odog - Monday, Jun 01, 2015 at 15:49

Monday, Jun 01, 2015 at 15:49
G'day Equinox,
I just take my missus with me... Sue will start on one corner, just with a stick.. Count to 30 or so, and go to the next, I'll just check with a gauge, and adjust... Doesn't take long.. We looked at all the deflators, but decided we could manage with out... We did a trip to wa, lots of sand and dirt... Wasn't a problem.. Cheers. Odog
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Follow Up By: equinox - Monday, Jun 01, 2015 at 16:15

Monday, Jun 01, 2015 at 16:15
Yes Odog - that's the way I've always done it however on my last trip someone suggested I should conform to contemporary 4WDriving techniques - so next trip I want to show everyone that I've at least spent a $100 on my kit :-)

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Follow Up By: Idler Chris - Tuesday, Jun 02, 2015 at 17:28

Tuesday, Jun 02, 2015 at 17:28
Alan, follow my motto and save yourself some money. Chris
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Reply By: CSeaJay - Tuesday, Jun 02, 2015 at 12:47

Tuesday, Jun 02, 2015 at 12:47
When I was in Dubai, we did a desert trip (organised, we were just passengers, but I'd say about 30 cars in our convoy only, with more than one convoy.)

After the drive to where the sand starts, there is a designated air-down areas, and on the way out there is a designated inflation station as all 30 cars come back at the same time.
The drivers all actually removed the valve. Deflation is so fast without the valve.
What surprised me was that they also remove the valve when Inflating. Again so much faster, even if you have to air up a little higher than required to allow for some air to escape when replacing the valve.

That put me onto the ARB deflator. A little more civilised than removing the valve with a normal valve tool, and no chance of loosing the valve (imagine it falling into the sand - lost forever)

But I would like to add that, in my opinion, the ARB model at $60 is exactly the same as some other 'brands' at $30. Only the packaging looks different, and the carry pouch. I have a 'Dune' brand (Anaconda) and it has not let me down

CJ
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Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Tuesday, Jun 02, 2015 at 15:22

Tuesday, Jun 02, 2015 at 15:22
On that valve thing, I have a couple of different complete replacement valves in my tyre plug kit, and a small packet of valves (short and long).
After a trip where one attendee had a cracked valve and leak, it is a really good idea to take these small extras, they fit in the plug kit under the plugs (but then I have used a full sleeve from the kit).
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