Designated roads and tracks

Submitted: Friday, Aug 07, 2015 at 13:04
ThreadID: 129904 Views:2121 Replies:7 FollowUps:5
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Does anybody know of a website where I can find out what tracks and roads are available to transverse legally. I do realise some permits are required from parks and aboriginal communities. There are tracks/roads on the Hema maps leading to various sites of interest but no indication whether these are on designated roads/tracks. I do not want to open a can of worms and cause a bunn fight, just an indication where to start for forward planning on my next trip.
location - Warragul -Victoria
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Reply By: Notso - Friday, Aug 07, 2015 at 13:46

Friday, Aug 07, 2015 at 13:46
You probably won't find that info all in one spot. This Link covers a fair bit of WA.

ANFC Info
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Follow Up By: GarryR - Friday, Aug 07, 2015 at 15:22

Friday, Aug 07, 2015 at 15:22
ANFC info site invalid when I tried.
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Follow Up By: Rob K (VIC) - Friday, Aug 07, 2015 at 15:58

Friday, Aug 07, 2015 at 15:58
Click on the link shown on the redirect page and you'll be able to download the attached pdf file.
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Follow Up By: GarryR - Friday, Aug 07, 2015 at 18:41

Friday, Aug 07, 2015 at 18:41
I also emailed Hema and they have advised that all the roads and tracks submitted are of public access unless there has been an ownership change. Permits on some tracks and roads still need to be obtained (onus is on me to check), but in general, from my assumption from what Hema is stating is, if its on the maps it is accessable by the public. These tracks are not taken from aerial imagery but are physically driven to obtain this information. I've also looked at the ANFC website referred by Rob K and also informs me of further guidelines (thanks Rob). Should others have other info to help me plan my next trip, (all plans sometimes go astray), it will help me tremendously..... Thanks for the input, as it takes me nearly 12months to plan a trip route, and this helps me research in what to do correctly as much as possible. thanks GarryR
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Reply By: Charlie - Friday, Aug 07, 2015 at 15:56

Friday, Aug 07, 2015 at 15:56
Often it just boils down to who maintains the road, if it's the local council you should be able to pass though, don't know much about aboriginal communities.

If you zoom right in Google Earth you can see the property lines in very light grey, if a roads one hundred percent legal it will follow the road reserve and have a light grey lines either side.
In some cases the roads informally made and will wander outside the road reserve so your technically trespassing and relying on the good will of the landholder.
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Reply By: Member Boroma 604 - Friday, Aug 07, 2015 at 19:10

Friday, Aug 07, 2015 at 19:10
Gooday,
I bought a Hema Publication about 4 years ago which I have obviously lent to somebody and have to claim it back, thank's for the reminder, was called Desert and $WD tracks of Australia I think.
Felt it gave good detail maybe someone else has one and can look at it and tell you whether it is suitable if still available.
Cheers,
Boroma604.
AnswerID: 588981

Reply By: LandCoaster - Saturday, Aug 08, 2015 at 09:13

Saturday, Aug 08, 2015 at 09:13
this is an interesting document, not specific to your post but it holds commment and notes about roads that may assist...
https://www.nhvr.gov.au/files/201410-0172-ce-bulletin-restricted-access-vehicles.pdf
AnswerID: 588998

Reply By: equinox - Saturday, Aug 08, 2015 at 17:11

Saturday, Aug 08, 2015 at 17:11
Good question Garry,

To be honest I do not think there is a single website that can help you with your query.
I would look at the tenure of the land that the road or track crosses first, and go from there.

On many tracks it is of course obvious that they are permitted to traverse without permission. For those with doubt then contact the landowner directly. If the answer does not satisfy you then contact the relevant head organisation of which almost all major landowners are a part of. I say "not satisfy" as the landowner manager may be unaware of the answer themselves and give a wrong answer, or may just not want the hassle of people traveling through their property and may try to dissuade you.

I am amazed at Hema's reply to you that all of their marked roads are public access. I'd be careful on that point, and remember that they do have a disclaimer of sorts on their maps.

You say you are in the planning stage so there is plenty of time to do a bit of research, however you do not mention any specific area, and as there are different governing bodies for different states and territories and their landowners I cant really offer much more other than that I have found most landowners pleasant to converse with, and generally are accommodating to the bona fide traveller.

Cheers
Alan




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Reply By: Bill D6 - Saturday, Aug 08, 2015 at 18:34

Saturday, Aug 08, 2015 at 18:34
I was interested in the comment that all tracks shown on HEMA maps are public access. So I looked at the HEMA map I have and it shows the tracks/roads on my farm ... which are definitely not public access. And I don't think HEMA have checked them out as they claim.
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Follow Up By: GarryR - Sunday, Aug 09, 2015 at 13:58

Sunday, Aug 09, 2015 at 13:58
Hi Bill, I also stated that Hema said the onus was on me to check. Yes, I found that many tracks on the map were not accessible due to signs being placed at various points. I visited a nature reserve just recently and on arrival I asked the ranger to alternative tracks out of the reserve, as there were many on the map that I thought I may be able to use. The Rangers statement was NO.. you MUST ..go back the same you came in, as the owners of the various stations around the nature reserve were private tracks. This point was taken. As you Bill, are a farmer of a property, my question is to you is why are these tracks still listed on the map ( no offence applied, just a simple question to understand what is going on). My next trip away needs to be planned to sort out what permits I need to obtain, but it makes it rather difficult if I need to contact every landholder whose tracks are shown on the map. This would be a absolute nightmare to track down an owner (not manager). I seem unable to find a simple solution, as if I make a mistake, some landowner/manager may not feel obliging to my mistake.
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Reply By: Bill D6 - Sunday, Aug 09, 2015 at 14:40

Sunday, Aug 09, 2015 at 14:40
Most of the maps are taken from CMA topo maps. In our area these have not been updated for a very long time. They show old paddock tracks that have not existed on the ground for years and years, historical tracks where leasehold land has been converted to freehold, private tracks and roads, easements, rights of way specific to certain properties, etc. I don't think there was any regard to differentiate private access from public when these maps were drawn up - this is often not an issue anyway. For example, if you are trying to get to a fire and using the map. These maps have then been uplifted with the errors. To be practical about it .... just ask at the nearest homestead if you are in any doubt. Its not the wild west and most farmers will appreciate a chin wag and have a genuine interest in what you are doing and where you are going. If you establish contact like this I don't think you will have any problem at all. If you later have a break down, get bogged etc. you will have a friend to help. I have had many people over the years come onto our place thinking it was a public road ... most have had the courtesy of introducing themselves when they realise they have made a mistake. There are ferals who sneak onto land and shot, steal etc and these people when caught don't get a good reception ... so just introduce yourself and get the benefit of the local knowledge.
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Follow Up By: GarryR - Sunday, Aug 09, 2015 at 16:02

Sunday, Aug 09, 2015 at 16:02
thanks for the insight, informative and to the point. My next trip is in sth Qld to another nature reserve for a 3day tag along with the caretakers of this property. My aim was to take a different route out to other points of interest to do some photography without having to travel the same piece of road twice. My exercise was to try and plan early with what time frame I may have, as there seemed to be no clear answer to access of properties apart from what I read about aboriginal and government land (both State and Federal). Thanks Bill you have now given me a path on which to work
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