Tpms damage

Submitted: Saturday, Aug 22, 2015 at 05:50
ThreadID: 130058 Views:2476 Replies:9 FollowUps:19
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Hi
I have external tpms on my car and van

I have been traveling for awhile with only a small amount on dirt road and have noticed my rims are being scratch my the tpms sensor.

Has any one else had this and have a solution.
Has anyone experienced other issues from using these tpms sensors eg to the valve stem

Rich
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Reply By: Member - Mark (Tamworth NSW) - Saturday, Aug 22, 2015 at 06:58

Saturday, Aug 22, 2015 at 06:58
I guess it depends on the valve stem length and rim design.
I purchased some for a trip to Cape York this year, probably done 10 000km so far with them including approx 2000km of dirt/gravel with no major markings on my rims.

Some previous threads about this problem talk about using shorter valve stems and/ or drilling a valve stem sized whole through a champagne cork diameter length of rubber/neroprene to hold the valve stem (and therefore monitor) away from the rim.

Do a thread search on TPMS and you will find the details

Mark
AnswerID: 589508

Reply By: Member - John - Saturday, Aug 22, 2015 at 06:59

Saturday, Aug 22, 2015 at 06:59
Rich, I have been told that if you fit metal valve stems it stops the stem and sensor flexing and hitting the rim, causing damage to the rim and sensor. I haven't fitted my TPMS yet............
John and Jan

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Follow Up By: Member - Rich - Saturday, Aug 22, 2015 at 16:59

Saturday, Aug 22, 2015 at 16:59
They probably wood work but reckon a lot of effort I think, never done it myself but will investigate.

I suppose you would have to remove the tyre off the bead at least?

Richard
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Follow Up By: PhilD - Saturday, Aug 22, 2015 at 20:45

Saturday, Aug 22, 2015 at 20:45
That is spot on. I have my steel rims double drilled and use a stainless steel stem to carry the sensor. In addition, I put a small piece of foam in the cap. Result, eradication of the vibration problems and in extreme conditions breaking the joins for the battery holder. The second stem also means you can deflate/inflate without having to remove the sensor each time.
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Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Sunday, Aug 23, 2015 at 18:07

Sunday, Aug 23, 2015 at 18:07
That's a top idea, PhilD.

Thanks
FrankP

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Reply By: BFreer - Saturday, Aug 22, 2015 at 07:22

Saturday, Aug 22, 2015 at 07:22
I had similar problem, also the occasional sender dropping out - fitted steel valve stems and not a problem since. No More rim marking and no sensor drop-outs.
AnswerID: 589510

Reply By: AlanTH - Saturday, Aug 22, 2015 at 09:14

Saturday, Aug 22, 2015 at 09:14
I had the same problem and cut some approx. 30mm squares out of some 2mm rubber sheet I had, punched a hole through the valve stem size, pushed them over the valve and refitted the senders and all fixed.
Just done a trip up the Gary and Talawana with horrendous corrugations plus some hwy running and they're working well.
Cheap easy fix.
AlanH.
AnswerID: 589516

Follow Up By: Member - Rich - Saturday, Aug 22, 2015 at 09:52

Saturday, Aug 22, 2015 at 09:52
Alan
As I am traveling now this is the easiest for me to do
I assume you push the rubber down onto the rim

Rich
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Follow Up By: AlanTH - Saturday, Aug 22, 2015 at 10:39

Saturday, Aug 22, 2015 at 10:39
Correct Rich, just seat them down and all your troubles are over. :-)))
Enjoy the trip.
AlanH.
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Follow Up By: Member - Rich - Saturday, Aug 22, 2015 at 16:17

Saturday, Aug 22, 2015 at 16:17
Alan
Just checked my van and car and don't think that will work for me unfortunately

Richard




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Follow Up By: AlanTH - Saturday, Aug 22, 2015 at 17:38

Saturday, Aug 22, 2015 at 17:38
Maybe just push the rubber down to just under the sender unit and see of that works. As the valve bends with speed it should hopefully stop it hitting the wheel.
Or cut the rubber a bit bigger but don't make the holes more than a push fit over the stem.
It's an easy thing to do so it's worth a try.
Good luck.
Alan.
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Follow Up By: Member - Rich - Saturday, Aug 22, 2015 at 21:42

Saturday, Aug 22, 2015 at 21:42
Alan
I was thinking of a rubber washer or something like that

Worth ago as you said

Richard
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Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Sunday, Aug 23, 2015 at 18:12

Sunday, Aug 23, 2015 at 18:12
I have used a chunk of closed cell foam from Clark Rubber. I used a hole saw twisted by hand backwards to cut a circular plug about 25mm dia with a hole in the middle. Push it over the stem. The sensor will sit proud of the foam so it's easily accessible but will not bash itself to death on the rim.

Cheers

FrankP

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Follow Up By: Member - Rich - Sunday, Aug 23, 2015 at 19:15

Sunday, Aug 23, 2015 at 19:15
Frank
Sounds good

Richard
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Reply By: Member - Rich - Saturday, Aug 22, 2015 at 09:53

Saturday, Aug 22, 2015 at 09:53
Thanks all to replies
AnswerID: 589517

Follow Up By: Mike S2 - Saturday, Aug 22, 2015 at 11:18

Saturday, Aug 22, 2015 at 11:18
Hi Rich,another thing that is worthwhile is to fit silicon covers to the sensor they protect the plastic cap from damage and will also protect the rim,available form tyredog at about $3.each got them on mine and very happy,cheers,Mike
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Follow Up By: Member - Rich - Saturday, Aug 22, 2015 at 16:56

Saturday, Aug 22, 2015 at 16:56
Mike
Good idea but mine are not tyre dog
Could use a rubber stopper, just have to cover the metal bit hitting the rim.

Richard
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Reply By: AlbyNSW - Sunday, Aug 23, 2015 at 13:45

Sunday, Aug 23, 2015 at 13:45
I have internal ones now but when used external ones I just put a bit of heat shrink over the stem and sender
Worked fine
AnswerID: 589558

Follow Up By: Member - Rich - Sunday, Aug 23, 2015 at 14:04

Sunday, Aug 23, 2015 at 14:04
How did you get them off then?

Richard
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Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Sunday, Aug 23, 2015 at 14:32

Sunday, Aug 23, 2015 at 14:32
The heat shrink only sits tight on the sender and is like a collar below it over the stem if that makes sense
So you can still wind them off no problems
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Follow Up By: Member - Rich - Sunday, Aug 23, 2015 at 14:53

Sunday, Aug 23, 2015 at 14:53
Yep
That would put a cover over the bit of the sensor doing the damage which would be good.

Rich
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Reply By: Member - Rich - Monday, Sep 14, 2015 at 17:30

Monday, Sep 14, 2015 at 17:30
As suggested I got some of the insulation tubing from burnings which slips over the valve stem and even the bottom part of the sensor
















AnswerID: 590358

Reply By: The Landy - Tuesday, Sep 15, 2015 at 06:06

Tuesday, Sep 15, 2015 at 06:06
Hi Rich

I use Doran 360 and have been on the vehicle for 60,000 kilometres without any noticeable marking on the rims.

I use rubber stems, but as others have said you can use steel stems.

And as a further note, the Doran 360 is a brilliant system, has never failed me at all.

Cheers, Baz - The Landy
AnswerID: 590372

Reply By: vk1dx - Tuesday, Sep 15, 2015 at 07:56

Tuesday, Sep 15, 2015 at 07:56
Morning all

Just looked at the Doran 360 system. Haven't got a price yet but that can wait. While solo time is not really an issue. In convoy it may irritate some. I don't like to irritate anyone at any time and also am curious about a change in pressure programming duration.

Over the period of one plus a bit days during the last Simpson trip we went from 35 to 25 to 20 and then to 16 PSI. If I had a TPMS system that would mean three changes of the programming. That was Oodna - Mt Dare - Old Andado and the first big dune.

When leaving the Madigan we went up to 20 PSI for the QAA line and back to 16 for Big Red (I tried just a slow drive up at this pressure and all good with the car weighing 3500Kg). And then back to 35 after Big Red.

I have no idea how long each change of pressure programming would take. Solo - no hassles. Travelling in convoy - do you think we would hold up the rest?

What would you educated peoples reckon? How long to program a change in tyre pressure stop?

Phil
AnswerID: 590373

Follow Up By: The Landy - Tuesday, Sep 15, 2015 at 10:16

Tuesday, Sep 15, 2015 at 10:16
Hi Phil

In terms of the Doran 360, it is very user friendly. Time to change pressure on the monitor isn't an issue - if I had to put a time on it, say 30 seconds all up for all tyres. What I am saying in the process of airing up or down, changing the monitor would even count as far as time goes.

They don't come cheap, but nor do tyres, mine have been on for 60,000 klms and just covered another 10,000 klms of a mix of tracks and off-track dune work and they have never failed to work.

Noting, some in our group had internal monitors and they worked well also, not sure which brand.

Cheers, Baz


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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Tuesday, Sep 15, 2015 at 10:57

Tuesday, Sep 15, 2015 at 10:57
I am not arguing about the cost. It's an "insurance" risk decision and dependant on each of our own situations.

What about battery life in the monitors? How are yours lasting?

I read somewhere that for the sealed ones, where you can't change the battery, you would have to buy a new monitor and at $50 each, that would mean another $300 (two spare tyres) at battery end-of-life. Ouch.

Phil
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Follow Up By: The Landy - Tuesday, Sep 15, 2015 at 15:58

Tuesday, Sep 15, 2015 at 15:58
Hi Phil

Have lasted 2 years so far, life is expected 3-5 years.

Problem with ones that you can replace batteries is that you will never seal them properly, leading to possibility of dirt and water ingression.

Cheers...
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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Tuesday, Sep 15, 2015 at 16:35

Tuesday, Sep 15, 2015 at 16:35
Figured that. But at $30 (plus inflation & exchange rate etc) per new sensor . $180 . . That's a bit outside the park mate. I may still look at internal ones though. We got up in the high country many times and the last thing I want to do is rip one off and damage the stem.

Hard decision actually.

Phil
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FollowupID: 858405

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