Spotlight Covers

Submitted: Thursday, May 20, 2004 at 09:08
ThreadID: 13024 Views:3563 Replies:5 FollowUps:15
This Thread has been Archived
Does anyone know the ruling in Queensland for having amber or yellow spotlight covers on their 4WD as I was booked for this.
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: flappan - Thursday, May 20, 2004 at 09:42

Thursday, May 20, 2004 at 09:42
More info would be good . . . like the offence , and the law that they booked you under (should be on the ticket).

Not sure on Amber , but Yellow is a fog light . . . . its a non issue.

I have seen blue light covers with non problems.

Blue or Amber lights on the ROOF are a different ballgame entirely.
AnswerID: 59385

Follow Up By: Rosscoe - Thursday, May 20, 2004 at 09:53

Thursday, May 20, 2004 at 09:53
I think blue is not allowed in NSW. Fog lights are not allowed to be used unless there IS fog or similar.
0
FollowupID: 321029

Follow Up By: shears - Thursday, May 20, 2004 at 20:02

Thursday, May 20, 2004 at 20:02
This is what is on the ticket:

Under Code and Identifying particulars of the office, the following comments:
Code 9493 - Fit a light not covered under S5 or a guideline.

and then under Information about the offence:
Amber covers on spotlights
0
FollowupID: 321114

Follow Up By: flappan - Friday, May 21, 2004 at 09:41

Friday, May 21, 2004 at 09:41
Shears , I think you are a victim of what we are discussing below.

Fitting Amber or Yellow Covers to spotties doesn't make them Fog lights , so therefore , if you have them on , its illegal.
0
FollowupID: 321161

Reply By: Rosscoe - Thursday, May 20, 2004 at 09:51

Thursday, May 20, 2004 at 09:51
Were the spot lights on at the time? In NSW it is illegal to have "fog" lights on unless there is fog or similar.
AnswerID: 59387

Follow Up By: Julian - Thursday, May 20, 2004 at 13:27

Thursday, May 20, 2004 at 13:27
Many people seem not to realise that foglights are designed to be low-set flat beams in order to iluminate the road underneath the fog.
There are numerous w****rs who insist on using them at the same time as dipped headlights in clear conditions, just because they've paid for them as an extra and they like to show them off.

These people need enlightening.
0
FollowupID: 321065

Follow Up By: Savvas - Thursday, May 20, 2004 at 16:26

Thursday, May 20, 2004 at 16:26
Julian ... they are also known as "look at me" lights
0
FollowupID: 321086

Follow Up By: shears - Thursday, May 20, 2004 at 20:04

Thursday, May 20, 2004 at 20:04
Yes they were on.
0
FollowupID: 321115

Reply By: Member - Roachie (SA) - Thursday, May 20, 2004 at 10:57

Thursday, May 20, 2004 at 10:57
This also raises the question...."what is a fog light?"

I have 2 golf-ball size lights low on my bullbar (as well as 2 similar ones mounted high on the back of my roof rack). They are the type that uses those cheap halogen globes the same as "down lights" used in some houses/shops these days.
These lights are next to useless as far as seeing anything with, but I use them in dull conditions (including fog) so as to be seen by other motorists. They were not sold as fog lights and the coppers have never bothered me about them. I usually put them on as the sun goes down (when I'm out on the open road) and then change over to my proper headlights when I need assistance to see the road myself.
AnswerID: 59395

Follow Up By: flappan - Thursday, May 20, 2004 at 11:15

Thursday, May 20, 2004 at 11:15
105. Front fog lights (1) A pair of front fog lights may be fitted to a motor vehicle with 4 or more wheels. (2) A pair of front fog lights, or a single front fog light, may be fitted to a motor cycle or trike. (3) A pair of front fog lights fitted to a motor vehicle with 4 or more wheels must have the centre of each light not over 400 millimetres from the nearer side of the vehicle unless the centres of the lights are at least 600 millimetres apart. (4) If the top of the front fog light is higher than the top of any low-beam headlight on the vehicle, the centre of the fog light must not be higher than the centre of the low-beam headlight. (5) A front fog light must-- (a) when on-- (i) project white or yellow light in front of the vehicle; and (ii) be a low-beam light; and (b) be able to be operated independently of any headlight; and (c) be fitted so the light from it does not reflect off the vehicle into the driver's eyes
0
FollowupID: 321039

Follow Up By: flappan - Thursday, May 20, 2004 at 11:17

Thursday, May 20, 2004 at 11:17
Forgot to add.

So technically , spotties like Lightforce , with yellow covers , are NOT fog lights , and cant be used as such . . . ie they need to be dipped just like you would when using high beam and spotties.
0
FollowupID: 321040

Follow Up By: Member - Roachie (SA) - Thursday, May 20, 2004 at 11:48

Thursday, May 20, 2004 at 11:48
Thanks Flappan,
So I guess that means I'm using mine illegally too. I only do it to conserve my headlights (I know that sounds a bit wanky).
Having ridden motorbikes in my younger days and having had to take drastic evasive action to avoid being cleaned up by motorists who "didn't see me", I've evolved as one who likes to know I've been seen, even if I am driving 3 tonnes of bullbar-equipped, double-diff'd grunt that most lesser vehicles steer clear of. Doesn't matter what you're driving, you can always come across the hat-wearing volvo driver who wouldn't know if the Queen Mary was up him unless it lowered a life raft. These people need all the help we can give them to see us.
0
FollowupID: 321053

Follow Up By: flappan - Thursday, May 20, 2004 at 12:36

Thursday, May 20, 2004 at 12:36
Roachie , what sort of wattage are they though ?

If they are what I think they are , they would be around the 25/30w mark . . . Call em Daytime Running Lights , not fog lights.

(4)

When on, a daytime running light must—
(a) show a white or yellow light visible from the front of the vehicle;
and
(b) not use over 25 W.
(5) Daytime running lights must be wired so they are off when a
headlight, other than a headlight being used as a flashing signal, is on.
0
FollowupID: 321061

Follow Up By: Member - Roachie (SA) - Thursday, May 20, 2004 at 13:49

Thursday, May 20, 2004 at 13:49
Flappan,
Not real sure what watts they are, but I've always thought of them as being 55's for some reason. Not even sure how I'd go about checking that?
They aren't wired to go off when the headlights are on, but I do always turn them off when I switch the mains on. They are simply wired independantly through a switch and relay. Not very bright and unlikely to dazzle anybody. (bit like me , really!!! LOL)
0
FollowupID: 321066

Follow Up By: flappan - Thursday, May 20, 2004 at 14:10

Thursday, May 20, 2004 at 14:10
They those piddly little things either side of your winch ?

If so . . . who cares . . .
0
FollowupID: 321070

Follow Up By: Member - Roachie (SA) - Thursday, May 20, 2004 at 14:20

Thursday, May 20, 2004 at 14:20
Yepppp; that's them (I'm surprised you can see em on the photo; I can't)
They are piddly and the cops have never hassled me about em so far; so guess your right; who cares???

Thanks mate
0
FollowupID: 321077

Follow Up By: Member - Jeff M (WA) - Thursday, May 20, 2004 at 18:23

Thursday, May 20, 2004 at 18:23
flappan, what if you use your headligts as daytime lights. I always drive with my headlights on, regardless of time of day or weather. Stops my deep cycle aux from charging 100% though :-( I get a 0.2V drop when headlights are on.
I started doing that when I had a grey car and kept having people pull out in front of me, been doing it ever since.
0
FollowupID: 321102

Reply By: Rob! - Thursday, May 20, 2004 at 11:37

Thursday, May 20, 2004 at 11:37
Shears,

The best answer I can give, is for you to look at the QLD legislation - TRANSPORT OPERATIONS (Road Use Management) ACT 1995 -

http://www.legislation.qld.gov.au/Legislation%20Docs/CurrentT.htm

(the website seems to be not working at the moment so try later)

It says in there what is allowed (in part 7 I think, under "lights and reflectors"). However, at the end of the day it's open to interpretation.

So unless you're prepared to mortgage your house and pay some over priced lawyer $100 000 an hour to present your case before a judge, I'd just pay the fine, and hope that you don't get pulled up again.

Good luck.

R.
AnswerID: 59399

Follow Up By: flappan - Thursday, May 20, 2004 at 12:33

Thursday, May 20, 2004 at 12:33
"However, at the end of the day it's open to interpretation. "

You betcha.

AFAIK , Vic is the only state that doesn't have Fog light rules , however , they relie on the Misaligned and Dazzling Lights , Law they have.

0
FollowupID: 321060

Reply By: Member - Jeff M (WA) - Thursday, May 20, 2004 at 18:30

Thursday, May 20, 2004 at 18:30
All in all it normally takes and arrogant mean powertripping cop with no real intent on protecting the people that pay their wages to give out a fine for this type of thing.
Unfortunatally there seems to be more and more reports of this crap going on...
Police.... Where'd the good ones go?
I had an accident once when I was yonger, wrapped my 1994 bluebird around a re-enforce power pole. My girlfriend was bleeding internally and in agony on the driveway of a strangers house. It was bucketing with rain. Two police sat in the paddy wagon and refused to help because "they were'nt traffic police".
Instead the neighbours helped us calm her down and do what we could with limited first aid knowledge until the abulance arrived.
They obviously didn't want to get wet.... One of several personal stories that end up leaving a bitter taste in your mouth regarding the people who are supposed to be looking after us.
AnswerID: 59446

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)