Potable water Plastic 20Lt jerry Cans?

Submitted: Wednesday, Nov 11, 2015 at 19:13
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I am looking to buy two plastic potable water jerry cans. After searching the internet I came across a company called Proquip and purchased two of their "food grade" jerry cans via Supacheap Auto (retail outlet).

After giving the containers a good rinse, I used them over a two week period but could not get rid of the strong vanilla/floral taste and smell.

I contacted the company and was told that a particular batch had been overinjected with vanilla,(to give the cans a pleasant smell,) and to add bicarb soda and boiling water then screw on the cap. The vapours produced were supposed to open the pores in the plastic and release the overdose of vanilla. I tried this to no avail and also tried lemon juice and nappysan to no avail and am now left with two containers that I cannot use for the purpose intended.

Wondering if anyone has been able to find potable water jerry cans if they exist, or ones that do not give off the plastic taste and smell please?



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Reply By: garrycol - Wednesday, Nov 11, 2015 at 19:34

Wednesday, Nov 11, 2015 at 19:34
The standard "light blue" plastic jerries available from all the usual outlets like BCF, Supercheap, Anaconda etc all work fine.

Garry
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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 00:21

Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 00:21
We got some from Bunnings - no problems at all with them.

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Follow Up By: Zippo - Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 17:06

Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 17:06
Same as Motherhen. We opted for 10L with a bung/tap. Been around the block twice, still tastes like Perth water.
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 17:40

Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 17:40
The light blue ones allow light to penetrate through & grow algae after a period of time. The khaki ones from places such as Aussie Disposals are much better.

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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 17:44

Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 17:44
At least you can see the algae Shaker. Soak in a bleach solution, shake and rinse well. Best keep all plastic out of the light anyway because it degrades and can split when you have it in the car full of water :O



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Follow Up By: Shaker - Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 20:56

Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 20:56
No thanks, I would rather have one that didn't grow algae in the first place.

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Follow Up By: garrycol - Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 21:13

Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 21:13
Never had a problem with algae in mine.
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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 22:15

Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 22:15
Are you certain there is none in yours Shaker?

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Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Friday, Nov 13, 2015 at 05:48

Friday, Nov 13, 2015 at 05:48
Been using light blue Willow brand for over 25 years. No taste and never had Algae.
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Reply By: Member - Odog - Wednesday, Nov 11, 2015 at 19:57

Wednesday, Nov 11, 2015 at 19:57
Hey toucan, have a try with vinegar, just put half a litre or so, of white vinegar, give it a good swish around, and a good rinse.. I have used it in the past, with good results.. Cheers Odog
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Reply By: TomH - Wednesday, Nov 11, 2015 at 19:59

Wednesday, Nov 11, 2015 at 19:59
My two Supercheap ones Ive had for 7 years still are Ok No taste from the water.
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Reply By: Sand Man (SA) - Wednesday, Nov 11, 2015 at 21:21

Wednesday, Nov 11, 2015 at 21:21
My water containers are of the olive Jerrycan style, but with round screw type caps. They accept a screw in tap at the bottom, but the caps are big enough to drill out to attach a manual water pump. Using this, I can leave the containers in their racks at the rear of my caravan. I added a length of food grade hose to pick up water from the bottom, thus ensuring I can pump virtually all water out while the containers remain upright.

I bought them from Anaconda, who have two different styles.
Oh! and the containers have been of potable quality from new.
This is my drinking water supply when bush camping. My on board water tank does have a slight "plastic" taste regardless of what I have tried to eliminate it. It is gradually getting better, but I use this supply for washing, etc. at present.
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Reply By: Dion - Wednesday, Nov 11, 2015 at 22:34

Wednesday, Nov 11, 2015 at 22:34
Depending upon your intended use and life cycle of water containers, are 10L boxed water bladders better?
In 2007 on a two week long expedition along the C.A.R from Port Augusta to Alice Springs I used water containers. We carried sufficient water with is and didn't need to top up at all, and didn't run out. The downside was when we did empty containers, as the containers were to good to not bring home, we found volume taking up space (containers of course are not collapsible) for no further reason.
Repeating the same trip in 2011, same duration etc, instead of water containers, I brought a dozen 10L boxed water, from Big W or Woolies. They were $4.15ea, so with just some small change from $50, we had 120L of water, six boxes in each ute. This was actually sufficient for our needs, including dish washing, brushing teeth, cooking, drinking etc.
As each box was emptied, the bladder was completely purged of all air so that they were flat, the cardboard boxes were ripped up and burned, handy for getting the fire going. So what at the start of the trip, each box actually taking up the space of 12L, created space as they were consumed, less the empty flattened bladder.
Currently I'm now working in Alice Springs, in a rental. I'm still buying boxed water for use as Potable Water, from Woolies at just under $4 for a 10L box.
If you can buy the boxed water at large department stores in suburbia before heading bush, I reckon they are great value for the convenience of being able to dispose of the box once consumed. I have seen though, in some of the more remote places selling 10L boxed water at around the $10 mark.
Anyway, it is just a suggestion.
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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 00:26

Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 00:26
We purchased a collapsible 20 litre water canister for $5 for extra water to take camping a few years ago. We don't need it when caravanning but take it along in case we have to remove grey water from a campsite. It takes up next to no room when collapsed down. The only drawback was the tap could get bumped on a little in transit and spill. Sitting it in the large bowl we carry when camping contained any spillage.

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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 00:27

Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 00:27
Dion, I am at a little loss here. What was the value of achieving more space as you proceeded? What did you use the space for? And what did you do with the collapsed bladders?
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Follow Up By: Member - John - Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 01:19

Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 01:19
Allan, I use empty wine bladders as "space fillers" as stuff is used in the fridge or storage boxes etc. Maybe that is how the empty bladders got used, but maybe not when the OP says folded flat.........
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Follow Up By: Dion - Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 08:31

Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 08:31
Hi Allan,
the creating of space whilst the trip is progressing, I understand your question. Perhaps it's psychological for me, gives a physical indication of a trip progressing. A bit like watching the fuel level decreasing as the trip has progressed.
What I didn't explain in my initial post, is the configuration of my utes.
Fair to say as a generalisation, most utes used to do a 4WD trip of our wonderful country are twin cabs, so lets say 80%. Of those twin cabs, then again 80% of them have a canopy, then perhaps 80% of those with canopies have a drawer system. Some people like that organisation and structure in what and how they carry their equipment and victuals for their trip. A generalisation remember.
My utes have been Rodeo's, R9, RA's and now a D-Max. All of these have been space cabs with tubs. I'm not a fan of canopies (had one on a Commodore ute once) I've always used hard lids on my 4WD utes. To have a dedicated drawer system would eat into height, as my loading within the tub can only go up to water level. Most fridges (mine are Engels) just come in for height, allowing the lid to shut. I think my loading is different to the generalised norm.
Usually when I go away, I find that both utes are absolutely full. I just find that by being able to dispose of boxed containers of water that have served their useful purpose, every morning thereafter when breaking camp, we don't have to be so anal in placing things exactly, if we have that little extra space.
As for the emptied flattened bladders, they are binned where bins are provided. Although the first couple are always retained, for 'just in case'
Another thing I like about the boxed water, just buy them and go. No need to examine every water container, flush it out, give it a sniff, give the water a taste, then filling it. Boxed water, from large department stores is always fresh.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 09:21

Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 09:21
Thanks Dion, I understand. Roz seemed to from the start. She said "It just gives you room to move"!
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Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Friday, Nov 13, 2015 at 19:38

Friday, Nov 13, 2015 at 19:38
Hi Allan, Now our kids are grown and gone, we just take the Patrol and leave the off-road trailer home. When we head off, we are loaded to the hilt and getting to some things means removing neatly packed gear to get to them. We find it a relief when our supplies starts to thin out a little, makes packing and unpacking a little easier. We take a few square 25 liter water containers but I'm liking the cask and or bladder type idea, it would really make a difference to the space as we use it! Regards, Michael
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Reply By: wholehog - Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 10:08

Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 10:08
As our extended trips progress, I look forward to the reduced vehicle tare..not the increasing cabin volumetric gains..??
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Reply By: toucan2489 - Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 11:37

Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 11:37
Many thanks for all the responses. Good tips and alternatives to consider. Really appreciated.

Thanks again.

Toucan
AnswerID: 592623

Reply By: disco driver - Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 11:52

Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 11:52
My experience with water jerricans is that they all tend to taint, and that's all it is, the water for some time after purchase.
However after a period of time in use the taint totally disappears and the water is completely palatable.

Persist with them, fill them up, let stand for a few days and empty onto the garden. Repeat for as long as necessary and the smell and taint will go.

Disco..
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 13:02

Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 13:02
I have 3x 40 litre poly tanks built-in to the Troopy and like Disco we experienced a taint at first. Used "Tank Cleen" product from the camping shop but didn't help much. Some may recommend "NappiSan" or the like. However, with time and water use, the taint is gone.
Between trips, I keep the tanks filled but drain and refill before each trip.

Disco's advice on filling and draining is good but I would extend the stand time to 2-4 weeks. Not to improve the treatment but to save on water and work.
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Reply By: BluePrint Industries Pty Ltd - Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 13:11

Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 13:11
If your in Perth have a look at Bluebag they do collapsible ones which have replaceable food grade inserts.

They can also ship anywhere in Aust.
AnswerID: 592626

Reply By: Batt's - Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 14:37

Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 14:37
Well we all use large amounts of plastic products in our daily lives and lots of times you do get a taste you don't like from plastic drinking containers and we disguise that with something else but the truth is plastic regardless of it's food safety claims it's making some of us ill and possibly increasing the rate of cancer related deaths sorry about being so blunt. From the day a plastic item is made it starts breaking down and poisoning us and our planet even your toothbrush is causing harm to you so plastic is just something that has become part of our lives that we can't seem to do without it's called progress. Stainless drinking containers might be a better choice for the long term. Sorry it may not be the answer you were expecting.
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Reply By: Member - backtracks - Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 19:35

Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 19:35
I've never given it a second thought or had a problem. 5 , 10 and 20 litre clear plastic jerries from, no idea, all good to me .
AnswerID: 592645

Reply By: Peter_n_Margaret - Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 21:24

Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 21:24
We have not carried water in "loose" containers for many years, but when we did we used "Fuel Safe" (Nylex) fuel containers (that had never been used for fuel, obviously).
Made from the same basic plastic as top quality "water" containers, but much tougher.

Cheers,
Peter.
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Reply By: Idler Chris - Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 22:30

Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 at 22:30
I use old liquid pool clorine 15lt containers. Cheap, tough as nails, easier to carry than a 20 lt container, and after one rinse no taste. I have put a caravan type hand pump into the lid of one of them which makes getting the water out very easy. Also being portable you can move it anywhere you like.
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Reply By: LandCoaster - Tuesday, Nov 17, 2015 at 15:48

Tuesday, Nov 17, 2015 at 15:48
recently i swapped out one of my water jerrys for a round 20 litre food grade drum with lid. Not the ones from bunnings, i got mine from a resturant, it had contained mayonaze and i rinsed it clean with detergent and vinigar.

Before loading I filled it with water then tested it by kicking it around the yard, rolling it around the yard, dropping it off hieghts, slamming it into concrete walls, fliping it along end over end and finally, stomping on it, swinging it around really really fast and letting it launch...

I was amazed, it didnt leak a drop. So i found space for a second one.

Those round drums are just so versitile. During thier service as a water contianer they can also be used as other items like a table or a chairs or some form of stand or lean.
Once they are empty they are even more versitile. They make an excellent sealable rubbish bin, they are very easy to fill from a creek, great for a handwash bucket and the list goes on...

They also stack inside each other.

Yep, those drums are very very useful indeed...
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Reply By: LandCoaster - Tuesday, Nov 17, 2015 at 15:51

Tuesday, Nov 17, 2015 at 15:51
forgot to add, vanilla attracts cockroaches, pro-quip would know this....
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Reply By: Member - KeithB - Tuesday, Nov 17, 2015 at 16:32

Tuesday, Nov 17, 2015 at 16:32
You might like to try this stuff from Whitworths, which you can also buy from them online. It's got the plastic taste out of tanks for me and made my el-cheapo Bunnings plastic jerries sweet as can be. It also cleaned up the two 200 litre tanks in my boat after they were tainted by filling with a very old garden hose.

Star Brite Aqua Water Shock 475ml
SKU: 85034

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Reply By: toucan2489 - Tuesday, Nov 17, 2015 at 17:51

Tuesday, Nov 17, 2015 at 17:51
More good ideas and the water shock from Whitworths sounds promising.

toucan
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