Uhf

Hi guys in my cruiser when I got it. It had a uhf in it but was removed before I orginally looked at it. The wiring is still there. I just don't know what brand it was so I can put one back in. I will attach a photo of the wiring

It's not a good photo but hopefully it helps
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Reply By: Frank P (NSW) - Tuesday, Nov 17, 2015 at 12:38

Tuesday, Nov 17, 2015 at 12:38
Beastly,

I think you're looking at a simple 12V supply with +ve and -ve and an antenna connector.

You could cut off the 12V plug (Isolate the battery or remove the fuse if there is one in that circuit. The original fuse could have gone with the old UHF) and install another to match whatever is on your new UHF.

The antenna connector won't match a Uniden, but it may match a GME or other good brand. If there's enough free cable you could cut that off too and install a connector to suit your new UHF if necessary.

Do you still have an external antenna mount wired up and ready to go?

Cheers
FrankP

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Follow Up By: beastly666 - Tuesday, Nov 17, 2015 at 12:44

Tuesday, Nov 17, 2015 at 12:44
Ohhhh...... still pretty new to the 4wd game.... I thank you for your reply. Its given me an understanding.

I still have the mount on the bullbar it just doesn't have an antenna on it.
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Follow Up By: HKB Electronics - Tuesday, Nov 17, 2015 at 13:06

Tuesday, Nov 17, 2015 at 13:06
My GME doesn't use a BNC connector either.

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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Tuesday, Nov 17, 2015 at 16:10

Tuesday, Nov 17, 2015 at 16:10
That is a BNC connector. Our GME uses the PL259 style. One of my antenna leads is BNC like yours and I just use an adaptor.

Phil

PS Basically any 12V UHF radio will work. Go to a radio shop and get them to quote and show you a solution. You may even get them to install it for you. It all costs but it beats blowing something up.
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Reply By: MEMBER - Darian, SA - Tuesday, Nov 17, 2015 at 14:35

Tuesday, Nov 17, 2015 at 14:35
There might not be much point in seeking to exactly duplicate the radio again - if you are just after a basic UHF with the latest regulated configs, it won't cost the earth .... there are plenty of good makes and models to choose from#. Every time an installed UHF is replaced, renewal of wiring, connectors and fuses etc. (even the location of the power source) may be required - and that way, you know its all done properly. A warning though....if you have to put a new plug on the antenna coax cable, the soldering and checking of the finished work must be precise, or you can 'cook the innards' of the new UHF. If not into that, you may be able to buy a completed coax setup from end to end.....you just need to get the fat plug through the car's firewall (if routing that way :-)....good luck with the project.
#have a look athttp://www.prestigecom.net.au/ as an online example (keen pricing and free delivery - I have no affiliation))
(*radio tech-speak :-)
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Follow Up By: Phil 23 - Saturday, Nov 21, 2015 at 08:03

Saturday, Nov 21, 2015 at 08:03
Bought a new aerial a few months back, a Uniden from memory.
What surprised me was that the coax was fitted with an Female FME connector.

They also supplied a FME to PL-259 adaptor.
Figured the reason they did it was to make it easier to get thru the firewall.

Actually needed BNC as the final connection to an Icom Hand Held, so made a male FME to BNC fly lead to avoid a 2" stack of adaptors on the hand held.

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Reply By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Tuesday, Nov 17, 2015 at 14:42

Tuesday, Nov 17, 2015 at 14:42
Hi Beastly

From the picture that you have posted, I would say it was a Uniden UHF and the BNC fitting I am not sure.

GME use a completly different power lead and antenna fitting.

If it was me, I would test the power lead to make sure that it is live and has power. If so you can easily cut the end off and solder new fittings to the end.

Seeing that you do not have an antenna, I would disguard the coax and start from fresh with a new antenna and lead. If you can follow the old coax through the firewall, use that to pull your new coax through.

If you want to hide the head unit, there are a number of new UHS's that will do the job for you, leaving only the microphone visible.

If you are handy with a soldering iron, it is a dead easy job.



Cheers



Stephen
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Follow Up By: Member - Ian T6 - Wednesday, Nov 18, 2015 at 15:10

Wednesday, Nov 18, 2015 at 15:10
Agree with the abandoning of existing Bnc and co ax it may be 75ohm if it was a VHF set hard to tell from photo better to replace.

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Follow Up By: Nomadic Navara - Thursday, Nov 19, 2015 at 01:35

Thursday, Nov 19, 2015 at 01:35
I have not seen a two way radio aerial with 70 ohm coax since the 60s. Not much chance of it being 75 ohm coax.
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Follow Up By: Zippo - Thursday, Nov 19, 2015 at 15:13

Thursday, Nov 19, 2015 at 15:13
Agree wholeheartedly with PeterD.

I'd check the coax for short/continuity and if OK stick on an antenna of your choice and use the appropriate adaptor at the radio - beats the heck out of replacing a working coax that has already been run point-to-point.
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Thursday, Nov 19, 2015 at 18:30

Thursday, Nov 19, 2015 at 18:30
Hi Zippo

Peter has not mentioned anything about using this cable. The issue I see in re using the cable that is there is that you will have to have joiners and adapters to connect the new antenna to the old coax.

If you know what you are doing, it is not a hard job to run coax from the front of the car to inside the cabin. Doing it that you, you are starting off with fresh new coax and not having to use 4 plugs and joiners inside of only using 1.

These are my thoughts only and what I would be doing if it was me.




Cheers



Stephen
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Follow Up By: Zippo - Thursday, Nov 19, 2015 at 19:25

Thursday, Nov 19, 2015 at 19:25
Stephen, no - I was agreeing with PeterD's comment re the coax not being 75 (70) ohm.

The O/P did say "I still have the mount on the bullbar it just doesn't have an antenna on it." and from that I would read that the antenna base is there and still connected to the coax.

While I may be well off target, if this is the usual ex-miner they would simply have removed the radio and the antenna, considering the base/coax/power lead not worth the effort to recover. In that case, the only adaptor would be at the transceiver itself, and that is assuming IT doesn't come with a BNC. I would consider a trade install - as the vehicle would have had in their workshop - to be at least the equal of most DIY coax termination efforts, so if it measures up I would re-use it.
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Follow Up By: Nomadic Navara - Thursday, Nov 19, 2015 at 20:04

Thursday, Nov 19, 2015 at 20:04
Stephen, I did not say the coax could be used again as there are a lot of unknowns. You are making the the opposite mistake, saying it in not reusable.

The cable will have to be visually inspected to see if there is external damage to it. Is the antenna base still OK. Is there enough cable at the inner end to reach the new installation. If these are all OK then all that needs to be done is for an adaptor purchased to fit the radio and a suitable whip sourced to screw onto the base.

Working this way most members who can re jig the power wiring are capable of installing a new radio. I would not bother to mention the little extra loss an adaptor will introduce as the poor sighting of the antenna anywhere else than the middle of the roof of the vehicle will have a larger effect on efficiency of the system.
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Reply By: muzbry - Tuesday, Nov 17, 2015 at 14:47

Tuesday, Nov 17, 2015 at 14:47
Gday
The red and black wire is only a power lead , the other is an ariel end that will push into and twist to fit.
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Reply By: Slow one - Tuesday, Nov 17, 2015 at 14:48

Tuesday, Nov 17, 2015 at 14:48
Those 12v and aerial plugs go with a Motorola 338 radio and most likely a vhf unit, although you can get a uhf, looks like the vehicle was used for commercial work.

Their should be a fuse on the 12v cable as it is genuine motorola and as said you can change the the plug to suit the new rail and also the aerial connector.
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Reply By: SteveL - Tuesday, Nov 17, 2015 at 18:19

Tuesday, Nov 17, 2015 at 18:19
The power cable is quite thick so it was most likely a commercial radio, not a standard 5 watt UHF.The fitting looks to be what Motorola use.The antenna connector, however, is BNC.Motorola usually use Mini-UHF.So not sure there.
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Reply By: Stu & "Bob" - Wednesday, Nov 18, 2015 at 14:04

Wednesday, Nov 18, 2015 at 14:04
G'day,
As others have said, probably a commercial set was installed previously.
No biggie, just chop off the power connector and fit the one that you wish to use with your new radio.
The co-ax fitting can be either used as is, my GME Tx3600's use a BNC fitting like that one, or you can get a BNC to PL259 adaptor to change it over to a standard UHF fitting.

HTH
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Reply By: The Bantam - Friday, Nov 20, 2015 at 14:45

Friday, Nov 20, 2015 at 14:45
As others have said, don't bother trying to get a radio that just plugs in ...... the power is power ..... make sure its fused at its source ...... hopefully its a feed straight from the battery.

As for the coax ....... I know you have a cable leading to the bullbar. but that is possibly the worst place you can mount an aerial.

If you can manage to get the aerial mounted high and clear, you will be doing ya self a big favour ....... if you buy a 3to4db gain rubber ducky ( that are nealy indeistructable, or a 6.5db elivated feed whip ( the best band for bucks areail arround) they will both come with a pre-terminated coax, at leat at the aerial end some will come pre-terminated both ends.

There is a real good argument for running a new coax.

Avoid the big white sticks ...... they are simply overpriced and underperforming and give you very little choice but to mount in the worst location ... the bullbar.

cheers
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