Wading depth; a guide please

Submitted: Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 08:06
ThreadID: 131333 Views:5095 Replies:22 FollowUps:33
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It appears to be 8 years since a thorough discussion of what constitutes "wading depth" has appeared on this site.

Apart from the obvious air intake height, what other factors limit or determine the wading depth?

We plan to be crossing the Pentecost River twice in Late May and there is no manufacturers guide to the wading depth of our vehicle which is turbo diesel and auto. We will use a blind if we think it necessary. The fans are electric. I can disconnect the air box so that the air intake will sit just under the bonnet on top of the air box.

I will refrain from disclosing the vehicle and the comments of the Aust. dealership until later for that will take us off topic quickly.

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Reply By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 08:14

Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 08:14
The top of the wheel is a good indicator, Landcruiser and Patrol are 700mm. A smaller 4x4 will be less than that. Extra lift will increase your wading depth a little. A snorkel is best in case you drop into a hole, 100mm extra drop maybe the difference in drowning your engine, Michael
Patrol 4.2TDi 2003

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Follow Up By: disco driver - Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 14:46

Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 14:46
As a general rule, anything under 400mm should not require any precautions when driven with care.
Between 400 and 700mm proceed with caution
Above 700mm requires some preparation (blinds, no fan, snorkel, etc.)
In just about all cases it is worth walking through to check the state of the bottom (gutters, potholes, rocks, river flow and /or anything else that may create an issue.

If you are not totally confident, don't go there especially if you're on your own.

Disco.
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Reply By: Notso - Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 09:26

Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 09:26
You can add things like does the vehicle have breather tubes on the gearbox and diffs etc? When a hot diff or gearbox hits the water they get cooled down and can suck water in past seals etc. So you need a breathing tube up high somewhere to allow the gear box and diffs breath. Mounting of alternator and or other electrical components unsealed?.
AnswerID: 594764

Reply By: Baz - The Landy - Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 09:50

Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 09:50
The question, which is a reasonable one to ask, if looking for general guidance, reminds of an old flying joke – but it does have relevance to the answer.

Pilot rings the station owner and asks “will I be able to get my aircraft into your bush strip?

“Sure” the Cocky says…

The pilot duly lands and overruns the strip and ends up in the trees, the aircraft damaged and the pilot’s pride bruise.

Irate, he says to the Cocky “you said I’d be able to get it into your bush strip”…

To which the Cocky duly replies “yeah, but you never asked if the runway would be long enough!”

So on wading depth; possibly the answer is very specific to what you are driving and the water course you are crossing…

Cheers, Baz – The Landy
AnswerID: 594766

Reply By: Ron N - Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 10:42

Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 10:42
Your door and body seals are the crucial area involving wading depth. Nothing worse than watching water pour in through badly-fitting seals, drain holes, or air outlet valves that don't seal properly.

The trend in recent years is to install larger drain holes in doors. With larger drain holes comes the ability for deep water to invade the cabin area and soak your floor mats and underfelt.

With many vehicles having poor corrosion protection on the floor panels, that's a recipe for rusted out floor pans within a very short time. Japanese vehicles are particularly bad for this.

The older Hiluxes had a double overlapping panel in the floor pans, and this was a prime area for floor corrosion.

That was what I liked about my old '77 F100 4x4! A galvanised floor pan!

600mm is good general limit for many vehicles. The Amarok recommendation is 500mm. Most of the Toyotas are 700mm, the Ranger is reputed to be 800mm - but I wouldn't like to try it out for regular dunkings at that depth.

Been with the brother when he crossed a fast-flowing creek in his old bog-standard turbo-diesel HJ61 Landcruiser wagon - and the water was lapping the bottom of the windows!
I was getting pretty worried for a while, but the old Cruiser never batted an eyelid and just plowed on through.

Maybe you need to take along an old Suzy! This one puts on a command performance!

Cheers, Ron.

AnswerID: 594772

Follow Up By: vk1dx - Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 12:05

Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 12:05
Just to add a bit to the door seals comment. Take the linings off (they usually just clip in) and make sure the plastic membrane is not damaged and properly secured. We got about 4 - 6 inches of water in the car from the Balfour Track (over 1M deep) because the damned panel beaters didn't replace it. Just stuck it back in place and didn't even repair any dame to it. Useless twits.

Phil
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Follow Up By: Member - Rosco from way back - Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 18:16

Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 18:16
Hang about Ron, he may be driving a Landy, in which case there is absolutely no point in discussing the efficacy of the door seals .. in my last it was quite easy to see the bitumen with the doors closed. So there were adequate exit points (read numerous) for the water that got it to get out again.

Along the same lines as Baz, it reminds me of the old one where Japanese engineers invited pommie engineers around to compare door seals. The Japs tossed a cat into a new Cruiser and shut the doors. They all went off to the pub for lunch and when they came back the cat was dead from suffocation. The poms tried the same thing with a Landy and when they came back from the pub the second time the cat was gone.
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Follow Up By: garrycol - Thursday, Jan 14, 2016 at 22:53

Thursday, Jan 14, 2016 at 22:53
There are Landies and there are Landies - my Landie has door seals that are designed to keep water out for 20 minutes when submerged.
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Follow Up By: Baz - The Landy - Friday, Jan 15, 2016 at 07:43

Friday, Jan 15, 2016 at 07:43
My 'Fenders came with a raincoat to stay dry if it started to drizzle ;)

Good weekend to all...Baz
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Follow Up By: Member - Rosco from way back - Friday, Jan 15, 2016 at 09:39

Friday, Jan 15, 2016 at 09:39
You best hold onto it Garycol. I reckon you've got the only one the ever made with seals that work.
I've had 1 County, 1 Disco and 2 Fenders and they all bloody leaked, albeit the Disco wasn't too bad.
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Reply By: Member - brucek - Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 10:57

Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 10:57
Thanks so far:

What electrics are vulnerable and how can they be protected?
WD40 will do connectors etc but does the alternator or starter need treatment?
Do I need to find all the computers and protect them?

Re door drains & seals, yes, I was planning to tape up the drains and someone has suggested silicone? on the door seals.

BTW love the Suzi!
AnswerID: 594773

Follow Up By: Member - Rosco from way back - Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 18:31

Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 18:31
If it's clean fresh water, it's OK for the starter motor and alternator. Not so with salt water or muddy slush. I wouldn't worry about the door drain holes as they are there for this reason and outside the seals.
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Follow Up By: Malcom M - Thursday, Jan 14, 2016 at 08:05

Thursday, Jan 14, 2016 at 08:05
All electrics are vulnerable! Water and electricity do not mix.
If you are attempting a deep water crossing then squirt a ton on WD40 or lanoloin around the engine bay. Alternator and starter as well. You can't hurt it.
Use heaps and squirt it everywhere but avoid the belts. As well as protecting the electrics, it makes it easier to wash the muck out.
If you have a distributor then look at waterproofing that as well, silicon around the lid junction, plastic bag over the whole thing held down with rubber bands etc.
Most of this is just common sense when you stare at the engine bay.

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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Thursday, Jan 14, 2016 at 22:43

Thursday, Jan 14, 2016 at 22:43
.
Whoa Malcolm! "Silicon around the distributor lid"?

Worked once with a Mini Cooper rally driver who thought that was a good idea........ until he needed to adjust his points. Had to smash the distributor lid to get it off.

But there is a way to create 'removable' silicon joints. Simply put a thin smear of grease on one face and apply the silicon to the other face before bringing them together. Silicon forms a gasket but does not stick to the greasy face.
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: The Bantam - Friday, Jan 15, 2016 at 01:04

Friday, Jan 15, 2016 at 01:04
Probaly best to make sure the gasket on your distributor is in good nick ..... lots of japanese cars have them.

As for the minis and other front wheel drive leyland vehicles .... after a short while they make a plastic boot that covered the whole distributor top.

Lecky tape is good for sealing distributors ..... cheap easy and comes off.

cheers
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Follow Up By: Malcom M - Friday, Jan 15, 2016 at 07:02

Friday, Jan 15, 2016 at 07:02
Hi AlanB

A bit of silicon between the mating surfaces of the lid and distributor body would never require smashing it off.
I'm not talking about potting the thing, just sealing it better.
This is a common enough practice on petrol powered 4bys.

Anyway, smashing it off suggests a successful water crossing :)
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Friday, Jan 15, 2016 at 09:43

Friday, Jan 15, 2016 at 09:43
.
You weren't there were you Malcolm.

He was a skilled and resourceful mechanical engineer.
Believe me, it required to be broken to get it off.

It was not just a face-to-face surface. The distributor cap mated with the body in spigot form needing a shearing action to break the silicon. Essentially impossible.
Cheers
Allan

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Reply By: Slow one - Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 11:05

Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 11:05
There are a lot of vehicle engines destroyed by owners and drivers hitting the water at speed. The wading depth stated for a vehicle maybe 600mm but an engine can be destroyed easily in only 300mm by to much right foot.

Wading depth is at walking pace.
AnswerID: 594774

Reply By: Peter_n_Margaret - Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 11:47

Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 11:47
Front wheel bearings are the first big risk. They are difficult to seal 100%, especially if you enter the water when they are warm.

I have crossed the Pentercost many times. I have never seen it deeper than 300mm. It can back up a little with the tide.
In 2008 there was talk of concreting it. I hope they never do.

Cheers,
Peter
OKA196 Motorhome.
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Follow Up By: Slow one - Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 12:44

Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 12:44
Agree, many trucking companies and operators won't go into water that is more than 300mm deep for a couple of reasons.

Wheel bearings are a big one and some drivers don't know when they should pull up and don't risk losing the truck and load.
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Follow Up By: The Bantam - Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 19:36

Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 19:36
one of the #1 things you should do when preparing a vehicle is change to a water resistant grease ........ that means "lithium complex" or blue grease.
the older greases have pretty much no water resistance at all & if you get water in your bearings with no water resistant greases you will have a problem down the track.

Less of an issue with blue grease.

You can pump blue grease on top of old style luthium ..... in things like ball joints, universal joints and tailshaft slide joints, that you cant easily repack.

cheers
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FollowupID: 863353

Reply By: Batt's - Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 13:08

Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 13:08
Make sure you haven't been on the brakes a lot before hand some are prone to buckling. Electronics these days are the biggest concern cd stackers under the seat etc height at which computers are placed alternators are also nearly always forgotten about, your fan operating while submerged can cause big problems and some may hit the radiator cooling fins Definitely a good idea using a bling if in any doubt quite often people think it's too much of a hassle till it's too late, if you're able to keep up momentum you can drive through very deep water safely. Keep a snatch strap on hand attached to the vehicle so recovery times are reduced.
Have you got much experience doing water crossing if not get some practice in if you can in your local area with some friends it will boost your confidence and it will help you make the correct decision because you'll have a better idea of your 4WD's capabilities. Also you won't be unnecessarily stressing about what you may encounter on your trip.
AnswerID: 594783

Follow Up By: Batt's - Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 13:18

Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 13:18
using a blind not "bling only site on the web without editing capabilities so 1990's"
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Follow Up By: Bigfish - Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 14:16

Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 14:16
No editing capability and yet we put a man on the moon 40 years ago...lol
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Follow Up By: disco driver - Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 14:35

Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 14:35
Simple answer to the no edit feature.
Re-read a couple of times before hitting the "Submit" button.
Has never failed me yet.

Disco.
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Follow Up By: garrycol - Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 14:38

Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 14:38
Yes oh perfect one.
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Follow Up By: Member - brucek - Thursday, Jan 14, 2016 at 13:45

Thursday, Jan 14, 2016 at 13:45
I have nearly drowned the Peugeot a couple of times. But was mostly able to drive out.

Got caught coming out from Yerranderie after a heavy nights rain.
We waited for another vehicle, and thankfully the change of caretaker was happening that day.
The new caretaker had a Holden one ton V8 and drove through the 500mm+ water like it wasn't there, he didn't stop for us.
The old caretaker had an old Hilux and encouraged us to go through but the electrics got thoroughly wet. The Dizzy is insanely low. He ended up kindly towing us through the other 4 or so crossings. The electrics got so wet that we only had to see running water and it would stall.

The best crossing was Lawn Hill Creek where someone took a great photo of us.
Lights on, nice bow wave.

We haven't done any water work with the Citroen but I am now confident we can handle 400mm of water without much difficulty. See my last post for details.

Thanks for your interest and help.
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Reply By: Motherhen - Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 14:34

Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 14:34
The safety of crossing deeper waters also depends on speed of flow. You may chug through deeper still waters, whereas a fast flow will have your car off the crossing. As Peter and Margaret said, the Pentecost is normally a shallow crossing, wide but shallow. Other rivers such as the Durack will likely be deeper.

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Follow Up By: Member - Rosco from way back - Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 18:35

Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 18:35
Quite correct. A good rule of thumb is that regardless of depth (within reason), if you can't easily walk it due to the current, it's not a good idea to try to drive it.
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Reply By: Member - MARIC - Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 18:44

Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 18:44
I believe BruceK is referring to his vehicle which is a Citroën 2wd? In which case I wouldn't go deeper than tyre rim depth.
He is planning a trip gathering around Australia May next year with a nomination fee of around $100
Plus your own costs.
He might be lucky with a dry northern summer at low tide
Cheers
It is only when you see mosquito land on your testicles that you find another way to solve problems without violence

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Reply By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 18:54

Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 18:54
.
What may often be not considered is the buoyancy effect. When the water reaches the body it begins to buoy it up thus reducing the load on the tyres. This is particularly significant with faster stream flow as the vehicle is more likely to be pushed sideways.
A body-lift helps to minimise this effect as does higher vehicle weight. A tray back ute has less body volume in the water and suffers less from this effect. My weighty old Troopy with its high clearance is also less effected, but its weight may give more problem on soft sandy creek bottoms.
The SUV's with low weight and low body height would be more prone to the flotation peril.
The Suzuki in the video above did not suffer as it was simply full of water and had virtually no buoyancy.

Cheers
Allan

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Reply By: Ozi M - Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 19:13

Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 19:13
Probably best not to do this

https://www.facebook.com/autocrazeau/videos/1078315015532182/
AnswerID: 594796

Follow Up By: Member - brucek - Wednesday, Jan 13, 2016 at 18:41

Wednesday, Jan 13, 2016 at 18:41
What about water wings or noodles?
Both this guy and the Suzi were lucky.
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Reply By: The Bantam - Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 19:41

Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 19:41
Unless you have elivated diff and gearbox breathers you should not go over the hubs ...... this is probably THE first mod any body should do to a 4wd.

Some 4wd have elivated diff breathers, but they only go as high as the chassi rails.

OH the one everybody forgets ..... the fuel tank breather ..... it to disapears into the chassis rail on some vehicles.

No trouble ..... this is possibly one of the easiest 4wd mods to do.

cheers
AnswerID: 594798

Reply By: Top End Az - Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 20:37

Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 20:37
One of the best things to do when confronted with a decent water crossing of tyre depth or more is to pull aside for 10 -15 min and let the vehicle cool down. Good time for a cuppa while you are at it. There is the added advantage of someone else coming through whilst you are pulled over, so you can see how that vehicle goes.

We've done this going into Twin Falls Kakadu, and El Questro gorge amongst many others where the water was up a bit. Gives diffs, gearbox etc a chance to cool down a bit.
AnswerID: 594799

Reply By: Athol W1 - Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 20:41

Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 20:41
Brucek

A number of things determine the wading depth of any vehicle, not the least being the engine air intake but also such issues as the engine fan 'propelling itself' in the water and either breaking under the strain or contacting the radiator (or both), also location of diff and transmission breathers (whilst not being obvious at the time, but 0.05% water in the diffs is enough to destroy the bearings and drive gears if not attended to promptly).

Being an auto vehicle one thing to be particularly wary of is the increase in engine revs as you apply power to exit the water, this can result in fan and radiator damage that is less likely in a manual transmission vehicle. (Personal experience with both 3.0LTD Jackaroo auto and Toyota 100S TD Auto, both broke fans and only marked the radiator (very lucky)).

Depending on the wet season by late May the Penticost could be as little as 200mm, and if so should not be an issue for any high clearance vehicle, the Durack may be an different issue.

Enjoy your trip
Athol
AnswerID: 594800

Reply By: equinox - Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 22:33

Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 22:33
Here's me crossing Kings Creek. Not sure I would do this these days to be honest. You could really feel the water pushing against the 4WD.



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Follow Up By: Member - brucek - Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 23:33

Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 23:33
Is that near Kings Canyon?
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Follow Up By: equinox - Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 23:50

Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 23:50
Brucek - Yes just a few kilometers away. In between the resort and the turnoff to the canyon.

Looking for adventure.
In whatever comes our way.
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Reply By: Member - brucek - Wednesday, Jan 13, 2016 at 00:22

Wednesday, Jan 13, 2016 at 00:22
Thanks to everybody, there is a good deal of info here.
Keep up the discussion, I'm sure there is plenty more to learn.

Yes Maric we will be taking the Citroen C5 wagon.
Rhonda doesn't want me to take the Peugeot even though it is already set up and has done about 25,000klms of touring to places including Chambers Pillar and the Mereenie Loop.
The Cit. is more comfortable and uses half the fuel, which is a big saving over 18,000klms.
BTW I have already taken the Citroen up the Blackfellows Hand Track and to The Lost City near Lithgow more than once. No water challenge yet though.

Re the wading ability, which we still can't define;
I can undo the air intake from the air box and jam it on top of the airbox with the bonnet.
(Just for the crossing of course).
I will be organizing a breather extension for the gearbox and maybe for the fuel tank.
The snatch strap will be fitted and slung over the roof rack.
I will talk to my mechanic about blue grease for the bearings.
The Pentecost is fresh water I believe, so no issues with starter or alternator.
We wont be crossing the Durack River but we will go through Lawn Hill Creek.
I have already begun work on the blind.
I will be ready to tape up door drain holes.
I will be ready with the WD40.

Nobody has commented yet about silicon on the door seals.
Nor has there been any comments about under bonnet computers, relays etc
Apart from knowing where they are, what do we do to prep them?

The Pentecost river will probably be only 200mm after all this!

NB The Citroen dealer people are not even allowed to drive their cars through puddles?!!?

As well, all the vehicles on our trip must have light truck tyres or similar and an extra spare.
Everything soft and vulnerable underneath will be covered, with say, old plastic garden hose secured with cable ties. I will also be fitting a light gal. stone guard under the sump.
Every nut and bolt under the vehicles will be checked for tightness and cleaned and painted with light coloured enamel paint. and etc.etc. Prep is a huge key.

Three months to go on the 14th of Jan! See the Trip/Gathering section for more info on what we are doing.
AnswerID: 594808

Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Wednesday, Jan 13, 2016 at 15:22

Wednesday, Jan 13, 2016 at 15:22
"Re the wading ability, which we still can't define;"
I doubt there is a clear 'definition' for any vehicle.
As the depth increases, more components are at risk. Some of that risk is small and we choose to take them.
Wheel bearings, universal joints, under side electrical connections are some of the first. Then diffs, gear boxes, transfer cases.
Some of the risk areas can be significantly reduced, some are much more difficult.
Unimogs seal and pressurise the whole of the drivetrain to about 2psi to ensure that any leaks are out, not in, so the degree of effort that you can go to is almost limitless.

"Nobody has commented yet about silicon on the door seals."
A smear of silicone grease on electrical connections helps.

Keep in mind what water you have forded long AFTER the event and note any new noises or bearing wear or heat build up. Better to fix a wet bearing before it fails.

Take a grease gun and do an especially good grease job that can push any water back out of uni joints and tie rod ends etc.

Cheers,
Peter
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Follow Up By: Zippo - Wednesday, Jan 13, 2016 at 18:10

Wednesday, Jan 13, 2016 at 18:10
Bruce, have emailed you on a non-wading aspect. Rgds.
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Follow Up By: Malcom M - Thursday, Jan 14, 2016 at 08:20

Thursday, Jan 14, 2016 at 08:20
OK, you've gone away from just the wading depth question to a more 'water' related discussion.

You are better to use a product by CRC named 226 rather than WD40 on the electrics.
WD40 is a fine oil lubricant whereas 226 is specifically designed for lubricating electronics.
WD40 can insulate your connector surfaces causing a loss of volts where needed, 226 is made for the job and does not insulate the contact surfaces.

Regardless, take whatever lube you have and squirt it liberally over everything electric and all difficult to get at areas which may become rust traps. Be careful not to get any on the belts.
If you have a distributor then you want to run a silicon bead around the cap seal to prevent water ingress, maybe put a plastic bag over it and tie down with rubber bands.

You mention fitting a gearbox breather, don't forget extending the diff breather. Its much more susceptible to water ingress.

If you are crossing deep rivers and are unsure of your cars water proofness then look at putting all your gear inside rubbish bags. When your floods, this will minimise damage.
If you have a manual gearbox then do not change gear in the river. Start out in a low gear. Changing in the water can result in grit etc becoming stuck under the pressure plats and clutch surface which is rather bad.
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Follow Up By: Batt's - Thursday, Jan 14, 2016 at 20:06

Thursday, Jan 14, 2016 at 20:06
I retract my previous reply. Next time it would be sensible to tell people what sort of vehicle you're traveling in instead of keeping it a big secret so they can reply correctly I expected you had a 4WD not a car.
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Follow Up By: Member - brucek - Thursday, Jan 14, 2016 at 22:59

Thursday, Jan 14, 2016 at 22:59
Batt's
I want to thank you for your contribution which was as valid for my vehicle as for a 4wd, and I appreciate the time and effort you put in to it.
I believe that the same principles apply to all vehicles in this topic apart from the fact that some are more made to purpose already.

I kept it secret deliberately and reckon the thread has been excellent.
Most people kept on topic and as well we got a whole lot of driving tips that won't go astray.
Just imagine what it would have been like if I had said "Citroen" in the header.
I doubt that we would have got this result; a thread that can be referred to by all.
Thanks again.
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FollowupID: 863505

Follow Up By: Batt's - Friday, Jan 15, 2016 at 02:48

Friday, Jan 15, 2016 at 02:48
You would have gotten some that may say no and other may have said are you travelling alone and I wouldn't do it with a 2WD if the water is flowing too much and I hope you have the correct tyres and not low profile road tyres. Also be prepared to pull over a lot and let other vehicles pass which will add time to your trip.
You may have already looked at this link but 4WD's are recommended maybe hiring one would be a better option and the bottom of the page reads that if you break down it may take one to three days before a tow truck arrives. Personally I would hire a 4WD for peace of mind it's a fair drive and your car may never feel the same again.
http://www.drysdaleriver.com.au/travellers_tips.htm
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Follow Up By: Member - brucek - Friday, Jan 15, 2016 at 09:38

Friday, Jan 15, 2016 at 09:38
Thanks Batt's,
We are traveling in convoy with about 10 vehicles 4 of which are full size 4wd.
There are only 3 2wds the others are SUVs.

This is a trip that we have wanted to do for a long time, and you are right, doing it alone with the Citroen felt like it could be "a bridge too far". Our Peugeot club events have always been safe and fun, so using that idea we have invited others to come.
Hopefully the same safe and fun pattern will emerge.

I have made it mandatory that all vehicles coming with us must have light truck tyres or equivalent. There are other vehicle prep rules and suggestions as well.

We will of course drive within the limits of the vehicles and road conditions, there is no point hurrying. All our plans are detailed but we are ready to change whatever we have to.

With the convoy we will all have CB radios and if anyone looks like they want to pass we will give them plenty of room and notify the vehicles ahead.

Drysdale River Station are fantastic, especially Anne. Thanks for the link. I looked at it again and did some rescheduling and cut/paste into out trip info file.

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Reply By: Member - brucek - Wednesday, Jan 13, 2016 at 07:57

Wednesday, Jan 13, 2016 at 07:57
Woops.
We will be crossing the Durack River (twice) but not going into Durack River Homestead.
The video of the Durack River crossing is no more scary than the Pentecost.
AnswerID: 594814

Reply By: CraigB - Wednesday, Jan 13, 2016 at 17:37

Wednesday, Jan 13, 2016 at 17:37
Refer to your vehicle handbook. I've yet to find one (4WD) that doesn't state the wading depth in the specs section.
AnswerID: 594848

Reply By: Malcom M - Thursday, Jan 14, 2016 at 08:06

Thursday, Jan 14, 2016 at 08:06
Electric fans - so you'll be disconnecting those before you hit the water. Before they chop through teh radiator.

AnswerID: 594885

Reply By: Member - brucek - Thursday, Jan 14, 2016 at 11:23

Thursday, Jan 14, 2016 at 11:23
Thanks CraigB

The vehicle handbook says "If you unexpectedly encounter a flooded road and the depth of the water is such that it would touch the underbody of the vehicle, stop immediately and find an alternative route".

But then, they would say that.

We are planning to encounter a flooded road, so preparations will make a difference.

My mechanic says the computer is up high and agrees that the air intake and transmission breather need to be raised. We will have a look for other vulnerablilities.

The ground clearance is adjustable as follows;
Normal 135mm "My estimation"
Automatic on rough road under 65 kph 145mm
Medium max 40kph 175mm
High max 10kph 215mm

The sill height is 175mm above this so I reckon I should be able to get a 400mm wading depth without too much trouble.
AnswerID: 594898

Follow Up By: Baz - The Landy - Thursday, Jan 14, 2016 at 14:29

Thursday, Jan 14, 2016 at 14:29
Preparation is one thing, suitability is another. And whilst there is no doubting you are covering the first base, the second one requires considerable thought, especially as you expect to encounter water crossings…

Water crossings in any vehicle should be approached with (extreme) caution and whilst I may be stating the obvious given the discussion has revolved around a theoretical “wading” depth for your vehicle of choice, it should be noted that all crossings will be different.

So whilst 400mm is what you have calculated as a potential maximum, there may be occasions when the crossing might be only suitable to a wading depth of 200mm in your vehicle (or possibly any vehicle) and will depend on the crossing itself.

So you need to be comfortable that if a crossing presents itself that may not be suitable for your vehicle that you have other options available to you, such as route variance - and if these options are limited to getting assistance, than suitability becomes a key question that needs revisiting...

So, a couple of bob's worth from me, and I'll finish off by wishing you a great trip! Perhaps you can do a write up on it when you return in an EO blog...

Cheers, Baz – The Landy
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FollowupID: 863463

Reply By: CraigB - Thursday, Jan 14, 2016 at 13:43

Thursday, Jan 14, 2016 at 13:43
If it's the vehicle in your signature then it's not really designed for wading rivers such as the Pentecost.
AnswerID: 594902

Follow Up By: Member - brucek - Thursday, Jan 14, 2016 at 13:51

Thursday, Jan 14, 2016 at 13:51
Thanks CraigB
Correct! Unless it has been suitably modified.
We will be taking a modified Citroen C5.
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FollowupID: 863459

Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Saturday, Jan 16, 2016 at 12:19

Saturday, Jan 16, 2016 at 12:19
I was serving fuel at Kalumburu once when a BA Falcon s/w pulled in.
The driver asked 'Is this Kununurra?'
He had not had any problems.

Cheers,
Peter
OKA196 Motorhome.
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FollowupID: 863609

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