Carrying extra Diesel in Hilux 2010

Submitted: Saturday, Jan 30, 2016 at 21:23
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Wondering whats best setup for carry extra fuel.I would spend money on long range fitted tank but after finished traveling its a bit of waste of money.They are convenient as just normal fill up no mess no smell in back of Hilux.I know of 3 brands out there but worry they might crack or split on rough tracks .Any advice appreciated thanks
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Reply By: Idler Chris - Saturday, Jan 30, 2016 at 21:31

Saturday, Jan 30, 2016 at 21:31
These look ideal. You do not generally need to carry extra fuel all the time and these pack away to very little. Only draw back is cost. They look very sturdy so if they lasted many years they maybe cheaper in the long run. I do not know of anyone who has used them, but would be interested in their comments.

http://liquidcontainment.com.au/cartpage/viewproduct/9/20-Litre-Collapsible-Jerry-Can
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Follow Up By: Stephen F2 - Saturday, Jan 30, 2016 at 22:06

Saturday, Jan 30, 2016 at 22:06
Thanks Chris hope I can fit them in the space I got at rear of canopy .They look dam good .Also I see they sell the pump too.I tried finding one like this before but not available in Aus.. It would cost$300 for 3 bladders .Fixed tank over $1000 .Cheers Steve
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Follow Up By: Member - Ups and Downs - Sunday, Jan 31, 2016 at 09:48

Sunday, Jan 31, 2016 at 09:48
They state on their website:

'Folds down to approx A4 size' (which is around 210 x 300)

Lower down on the page they say 'Size: 540mm wide x 620mm high'

I hope they are to be believed with other claims.

Paul
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Follow Up By: Idler Chris - Sunday, Jan 31, 2016 at 09:55

Sunday, Jan 31, 2016 at 09:55
540mm X 620mm is the unfolded size
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Follow Up By: Member - Ups and Downs - Tuesday, Feb 02, 2016 at 09:41

Tuesday, Feb 02, 2016 at 09:41
Thanks Chris.
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Reply By: Member - eighty matey - Saturday, Jan 30, 2016 at 22:22

Saturday, Jan 30, 2016 at 22:22
G'day,

we travel in an 80 series Land Cruiser. We have a twin wheel carrier. One side we carry a spare and the other side is a two Gerry can holder. The Land Cruiser has a main and sub tank standard. With the 40 litres in two Gerry cans that gets us about 800 - 900 kms before we have to fill up, which does most of the time.

If you're handy with a welder many people make their own.



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Follow Up By: Idler Chris - Saturday, Jan 30, 2016 at 22:49

Saturday, Jan 30, 2016 at 22:49
Jerry cans on a wheel carrier are a no no for me. To much weight, to high, and to far back from the back axle. The vehicles stability is seriously compromised with this set up. Find some wet grass and try a tight turn under acceleration, when the back steps out you will be hard pressed to save it. Maybe not so much of a issue on bitumen, but on a gravel very dangerous IMHO. I would suggest to anyone with this setup to test your vehicles stability so that you do not get any surprises out there on the tracks.
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Follow Up By: Stephen F2 - Saturday, Jan 30, 2016 at 22:54

Saturday, Jan 30, 2016 at 22:54
Cheers sadly sold my 80series fantastic 4wd and no mods on it and went anywhere same as my earlier 60series .But both petrol cost arm and leg to do Qld and back to SA ..Got the Hilux still getting used to it and working out how to carry everything ...
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Follow Up By: Member - eighty matey - Saturday, Jan 30, 2016 at 23:17

Saturday, Jan 30, 2016 at 23:17
No worries Stephen. Diesel 80 is the go but I travel with two mates that have petrol 80s and they wouldn't have anything else. I guess you have to be prepared to pay the price.

I have to completely disagree with you Idler Chris, based on a stack of real life experience.
If I have the other spare on there it weighs about the same. If I replace the sub tank with a long range tank I'm adding another 80 kilos behind the rear axle.
We've had this set up since 2010. It has followed us to the Cape, Gulf, Kimberley, Corner Country, High Country, Western Deserts (including Kiwirrkurra and stood next to Len's truck), Birdsville and the Simpson, plus a lot of places in between. It has been on wet grass, dirt roads, gibbers, bitumen and never been an issue.
I wouldn't recommend it, or use it, if I thought for a moment it was unsafe.

Steve
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Follow Up By: Stephen F2 - Saturday, Jan 30, 2016 at 23:30

Saturday, Jan 30, 2016 at 23:30
Great I dont feel any better now ha ha ha I still stare at 80s when I see them and wonder. The Hilux is a mean machine but more like driving a truck .The 80s had nice ride all coil springs.And off course live tough front real axle ..cheers I will keep an eye out for 3 80s on my travels ...
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Follow Up By: Idler Chris - Saturday, Jan 30, 2016 at 23:40

Saturday, Jan 30, 2016 at 23:40
Hi Steve, our experiences are obviously different. Only trying help.
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Follow Up By: Member - eighty matey - Saturday, Jan 30, 2016 at 23:41

Saturday, Jan 30, 2016 at 23:41
Sorry mate.
We've set ours up for the two of us. It has a place for everything.
The old girl just turned over 552,000 kms and (fingers crossed) it's still going great.
It's hard to part with it because of the reliability. When it does break it's relatively easy to fix and spare parts are literally on the side of the road sometimes.
We're heading off in April for 7 or 8 months touring. Mainly to The Gulf again but probably up further.

Good luck sorting out your fuel questions.

Steve
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Follow Up By: Member - eighty matey - Saturday, Jan 30, 2016 at 23:49

Saturday, Jan 30, 2016 at 23:49
Where are you heading off to Stephen?
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Follow Up By: Stephen F2 - Sunday, Jan 31, 2016 at 00:06

Sunday, Jan 31, 2016 at 00:06
Not sure which direction to start .Live in Adelaide.I love Deserts worked in many in 1980s thats when fell in love with Lancruisers
Love waterfalls something and maybe only thing in common with missus , she is Thai .Want to take her Mitchell Falls I was there in 97 but heard its bit changed since then .Qld in 2007 found some wonderful places without grey nomads ha ha ha Did Creb Track and found out how good my 80s was getting out of deep muddy creek.I was stupid took a wrong track but found the spectacular waterfall did not see a soul there and back. Another nice place Cobourg Penninsula past Kakadu very pristine and only 5 4x4 allowed at a time .Maybe thats changed too..Sorry waffling on I love adventure been in very remote places .Balgo Hills I lived with Aboriginal family who took me to some amazing places.We went out to small community in Great Sandy desert what a drive .That place was the last frontier where some Aboriginals were still living way out with out any white man assistance so I was told ..Australia hey too big.So any suggestions which best direction to do trip around OZ its too big but I got plenty time sick of living in surburbia ....
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Follow Up By: Member - eighty matey - Sunday, Jan 31, 2016 at 00:49

Sunday, Jan 31, 2016 at 00:49
How bout you head up to Alice Springs, turn left and cross the Gary Junction Rd, then the Kidson Track/Road to 80 Mile Beach. Up to Broome and Cape Leveque, onto Derby and the Gibb up to Mitchell Falls and the end of the track at Port Warrender and Crystal Head.
Back down to the Kalumburu Road and spend some time eating the oysters and chilling out at McGowan's Island and up to Pago Mission. Before you leave checkout the Carson River Track from Kalumburu to Home Hill. They're doing tagalongs through there at $250 a vehicle, great value.
Check out Wyndham, Kununurra, Lake Argyle then drive down to Halls Creek and down the Tanami. You could pop into Balgo. Turn off at Yuendumu and head for the Tenant Creek and go east to the Davenport Range and drive through to Barkly Roadhouse and up to Cape Crawford. From there you've got King Ash Bay and Lorella Springs before working your way up to Darwin and over to the Coburg Peninsula.

That'd keep you busy for a couple of weeks.
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Follow Up By: Stephen F2 - Sunday, Jan 31, 2016 at 23:41

Sunday, Jan 31, 2016 at 23:41
Thanks Matey that is great itenary.What is best time before the hoards go to Kimberleys.I was lucky when I went maybe 10 4x4s
But 1 idiot in Landrover doing about 100ks down the narrow track wouldn't slow up so I scared the bleep out of my brother in passenger seat and drove completely to right to make sure the clown slowed down,I did not want broken windscreen .....I remember camp ground on beach after Kalumburu run dodgy..There were extension cords everywhere in the sand.Discovered the well healed had trailers with freezers on them .Filling. up with all sorts of fish legal and illegal and then piss off back home.It was a beautiful place and the dodgy owner took us in dingy up the river that was spectacular .He thought me and my brother weird because we not fish...Whats the Tagalong mob and is that 250 per day How does it work be nice to meet others with same love of bush...cheers thanks
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Follow Up By: Member - eighty matey - Monday, Feb 01, 2016 at 21:41

Monday, Feb 01, 2016 at 21:41
G'day Stephen,

The two camps up past Kalumburu - McGowans Island and Honeymoon Bay - aren't too bad now but they do charge $25 a night per head and you have to supply your own toilet paper. It's a great part of the World and there's plenty of fish and oysters so we made up for the charges. There's some great camping up past there with nobody for miles and that part is free but you do have to have a permit for the whole area.
Any fish up there has to be consumed there. They're pretty strict on any fish going out of the area now and a fair few people have been fined in the recent past.

The tag a longs are run by Wundargoodie Aboriginal Safaris. They're from Wyndham or Kunnunurra. Their website is www.wundargoodie.com.au. The trip is $250.00 per vehicle. That's great value. It's really remote area and you won't even have planes flying over. The track's only about 420 kms but you'd be struggling to do it in under 5 days. Great country.

We're heading up to the Gulf in April. Hoping to be up there in May and then buggerise about until November, although we might pop down to Boulia in July and do the run down the Hay River Track into the North Simpson Desert. Then we'll head towards Birdsville for the Big Red Bash with Paul Kelly performing.

Plenty to do in this place, eh?

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Reply By: Motherhen - Saturday, Jan 30, 2016 at 22:37

Saturday, Jan 30, 2016 at 22:37
Hi Stephen, petrol or diesel?

A half way in between approach is what we did for our F250. As it has one big long fuel tank with nowhere to fit an auxiliary tank; plenty of fuel, but if it split in the outback we would be stuck. We purchased a 55 litre (there were several sizes and shapes to choose from) poly diesel tank and mounted it at the front of the tray. It was then plumbed in so it could be emptied into the main tank like a normal auxiliary tank, or the vehicle could run directly from it. It could be filled from the bowser the same as any auxiliary tank. Then no lifting or spilling like topping up tank from jerry cans.

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Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Saturday, Jan 30, 2016 at 22:44

Saturday, Jan 30, 2016 at 22:44
What Motherhen said Stephen.

Have a look at these Tanks

They're well made, and the variety in the link would suit almost everybody.

I've been driving a bloke's 2015 Hilux, with a 140L tank. Probably get close to, or over 1,000K's out of a tank.

Bob
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Follow Up By: Stephen F2 - Sunday, Jan 31, 2016 at 10:12

Sunday, Jan 31, 2016 at 10:12
Hi Motherhem I have the Diesel Hilux ..cheers
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Reply By: Life Member-Doug T NSW - Sunday, Jan 31, 2016 at 08:17

Sunday, Jan 31, 2016 at 08:17
G'day Stephen
When I was working my Troopy as Pilot / Escort I had a 180 ltr tank sitting in behind the left side behind the cargo barrier, ti fill I had a riser pipe fitted and proper cap and filled through the left side window, it was never tied down, it never moved, this gave me the two 90lt tanks plus the 180ltr, it was easy to do Brisbane - Mt Isa without asking the truck driver to stop so I could get fuel, when I moved from Perth back East in 2007 towing my 20ft Caravan I filled up at Southern Cross, next fuel up was Pt Augusta, of course it is now removed, I don't need it any nore, so that is an option if you have room is to get one of those tough plastic tanks I have seen in the 4X4 stores and mount it in the front area of the cargo area of your Hilux. I have seen some with electric pumps mounted and pump into the tank via normal method.
Oh yeh and mine was gravity feed to the front tank, I had to remember to run on the rear tamk when draining the last out and turn the tap off or it would suck air... did that a couple times , lucky the old 4.2 will start again without bleeding.
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Reply By: Robin Miller - Sunday, Jan 31, 2016 at 09:50

Sunday, Jan 31, 2016 at 09:50
We carried an extra 69lt for a Canning trip using 3 plastic jerry cans.

We carried jerries empty across the patrols back doors.

2 in a special spare wheel bag we made and 1 in a homemade holder.

The doors can't handle the weight of full jerries but empty was ok.

Only as we left on the no-fuel part of the trip we filled the 3 jerries and squashed them into the car.

By the 2nd day we had used the petrol up and put the empty containers back outside the car.

Worked really well !



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Reply By: Member Andys Adventures - Sunday, Jan 31, 2016 at 09:55

Sunday, Jan 31, 2016 at 09:55
I have a long range tank put on my triton and get 1200kl a tank. The best part is when back in the city where prices move up and down not like the bush, you can wait till the price is at the lower side of the scale before having to fill up. Can save you a lot of money as the price range is quite large 30/40cents a litre, and you get 125lt. It doesn't take long before it pays for itself in fuel savings.

Cheers Andy
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Reply By: Geepeem - Sunday, Jan 31, 2016 at 10:44

Sunday, Jan 31, 2016 at 10:44
Similar to what Motherhen and others have suggested we purchased a poly diesel tank from Southern Tool Equipment that comes with a 12v pump and hose and nozzle (similar size to servos). They come in different sizes but we got 200 litres to put in back of dual cab. As well as useful for long caravan trips I can now do away with jerry cans and use the new tank to refuel tractor and bush basher on hobby farm. Its not permanently fitted to truck so can be removed if needed (I made a frame for it to sit in). The 12v pump just connects to my existing 50amp anderson plug near tow bar. When 4x4 tank gets low I just pump from poly tank into main tank. Only takes minutes. When fuelled up we now have approx 2000km range when caravanning or 3000km when not towing. Just last week I filled up at Costco with 263.99 litres of diesel for $250.
Have a look here:
www.southerntool.com.au
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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Sunday, Jan 31, 2016 at 10:56

Sunday, Jan 31, 2016 at 10:56
Likewise my husband made a frame around the tank to prevent damage fro other cargo. No pump needed; it gravity feeds into the main tank when that is selected. It is only as a back up in case of tank damage as we can get well over 1,000 kilometres when towing from the main tank. We used the fuel a few times to keep it fresh.

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Follow Up By: Geepeem - Sunday, Jan 31, 2016 at 11:01

Sunday, Jan 31, 2016 at 11:01
I forgot to say my poly tank and 12v pump etc cost about $850 a year ago. It also comes with a yellow lockable lid. Very happy with this set up.
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Reply By: Sigmund - Sunday, Jan 31, 2016 at 14:45

Sunday, Jan 31, 2016 at 14:45
Facing the same problem with diesel I carried 3 x 20l jerries in the vehicle, thoroughly strapped down. ProQuip Platinums. Not a drop leaked, not a whiff offended the olfactories.

Long distance boaties and motorbike riders know all about bladders. That would've been my second choice.
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Reply By: The Bantam - Sunday, Jan 31, 2016 at 20:32

Sunday, Jan 31, 2016 at 20:32
You have advantages because you are both diesel and a utility.
Diesel is a much safer clasification of fuel than petrol and you have more legal and safe options.

You also have a utility, that opens options of carying fuel relativly low and in front of the axle, that you would not have with a station waggon.

a lot of people dismiss the weight distribution issues of carrying heavy things high and significant distances away from the centre of the vehicle, particularly at the extreem rear of the vehicle. ...... but adding 100 to 150kg ( the weight of rear bar work pluss that carried on it) to the extreem rear of the vehicle can't help but badly effect the handling and stability of the vehicle.



what sort of tray you have will influence what options you have.

A lot of people continue to carry fuel in jerries, because of the low cost, flexibility and the multiple container safety factor.

There are a lot of different portable tank options out there too.

The single biggest issue is how these fuel containers are restrained ..... with a full 20 litre gerry weighing in at around 18Kg ....... that is a big lump of mass if it should come loose in and accident or a rollover.
The bigger tanks have a bigger load restraint issue.

cheers
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Follow Up By: Idler Chris - Tuesday, Feb 02, 2016 at 00:19

Tuesday, Feb 02, 2016 at 00:19
Could not agree more with you Bantam your 3rd paragraph on weight distribution is spot on, and anyone not heeding it is asking for trouble. I have mentioned this point a number of times in other posts. The most common reply I get is someone saying they do not agree as they have never had a problem. They do not seem to understand that most of the time eveything will be fine, but if the unexpected happens the vehicle is nowhere near as stable and keeping on the road may not be possible.
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Reply By: Hoyks - Tuesday, Feb 02, 2016 at 09:40

Tuesday, Feb 02, 2016 at 09:40
I really don't think you can beat jerry cans for simplicity and flexibility.
But, If it is going in the back of a ute, I'd get something that keeps the weight up close to the head board. Too many bent vehicles from too much weight too far back. Something like this: (they also sell some on eBay). I have a alloy tray, so have been thinking about a flat one to fit between the tray rails. I had a water tank there on my old ute and it was a great addition.
http://www.enmachind.com.au/product-category/poly-rv-products/rv-4wd-diesel-tanks/


Another option are the GT Campers Tub Tanks. He also does a water one. http://www.gtcampers.com.au/
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