Solar idiot

Submitted: Friday, Mar 11, 2016 at 21:38
ThreadID: 131807 Views:2898 Replies:4 FollowUps:19
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Yeah I'm the idiot , l have a solar panel with the remote reg , I managed to plug the battery lead to the panel and the solar lead to the battery , back to front .

Is that likely to bugger the AGM batt .
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Reply By: Athol W1 - Friday, Mar 11, 2016 at 21:47

Friday, Mar 11, 2016 at 21:47
Jackolux
Whilst it will not have done the battery any favours it has almost certainly to have fried the solar panel and reg., as electronic components do not like reverse current flow.

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Athol
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Follow Up By: Jackolux - Friday, Mar 11, 2016 at 21:54

Friday, Mar 11, 2016 at 21:54
Thanks Athol , I better get em both checked out .
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Reply By: HKB Electronics - Friday, Mar 11, 2016 at 22:54

Friday, Mar 11, 2016 at 22:54
As long as you didn't transpose the polarities then no damage should have occurred, ie positives to positives and negatives to negatives.

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Reply By: 9900Eagle - Saturday, Mar 12, 2016 at 06:17

Saturday, Mar 12, 2016 at 06:17
Mate, it is easy to stuff up and we all do, with the exception of those who believe they are god material.

If you are using anderson plugs, it might pay to use red one on the reg output and a red one on the corresponding lead.
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Follow Up By: Jackolux - Saturday, Mar 12, 2016 at 07:35

Saturday, Mar 12, 2016 at 07:35
Yep , it's not the first time , I has stuffed something up , won't be the last .

The reg seems ok , I checked it with my multimeter .

I'm having trouble with my 24 year old Engel , pulling the batt down to 12.4-12.3v overnight .
Might be time for a new fridge .

Thanks Jacko .
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Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Saturday, Mar 12, 2016 at 07:56

Saturday, Mar 12, 2016 at 07:56
Jacko,

It would be a good idea to have your battery checked out by having a load test done on it.
The Engel, regardless of its age, should not be drawing the battery down from "full charge" to 10.4v overnight.
10.4v is FLAT and may mean that it is your battery and not the Engel that is your real problem.
You could connect an ammeter in line with the fridge lead to determine exactly what the current draw is, but I would be suspecting the battery myself.


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Follow Up By: Gronk - Saturday, Mar 12, 2016 at 09:34

Saturday, Mar 12, 2016 at 09:34
While you are probably right regarding the battery, he didn't state what size battery it was, so getting down to 12.4V ( NOT 10.4 ) overnight is not too much out of the ordinary for say a 80a/h battery.
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Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Saturday, Mar 12, 2016 at 09:43

Saturday, Mar 12, 2016 at 09:43
Oh bugger!

Your absolutely right Gronk. I claim a Seniors moment and it was early in the morning.
12.4v is not all that bad and is definitely not flat.

Jacko, take my advise with a grain of salt:-)
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Follow Up By: Jackolux - Saturday, Mar 12, 2016 at 09:56

Saturday, Mar 12, 2016 at 09:56
LOL . Bill we all do it
Battery is a Marine -Intimidator - AGM - 92 AH @ 20H how , never really understood how that works out in straight Amp-hr
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Follow Up By: HKB Electronics - Saturday, Mar 12, 2016 at 11:18

Saturday, Mar 12, 2016 at 11:18
92 AH @ 20H indicates it has a capacity of 92AH when discharged at a constant 20A.

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Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Saturday, Mar 12, 2016 at 12:52

Saturday, Mar 12, 2016 at 12:52
HKB,

Doesn't the 20H mean it has 92Ah if discharged over a period of 20 hours. The current required to do that would be 92 divided by 20, = 4.6 amps.

That's the way I understand it.

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Follow Up By: HKB Electronics - Saturday, Mar 12, 2016 at 13:05

Saturday, Mar 12, 2016 at 13:05
Hi Frank,

I'll stand corrected, I assumed the expression was not quite correct as I'm more used to seeing it expressed as RC capacity, ie 125 minutes @ 25A rate.

92AH at 20H makes sense as you put it though it seems quite a slow rate of discharge to achieve only 92AH.

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Reply By: Rangiephil - Saturday, Mar 12, 2016 at 12:32

Saturday, Mar 12, 2016 at 12:32
No it doesn't.
The 20 hour rate is the number of amps produced by the battery when run dead flat over a 20 hour period.
The 20 amp thing is the basis of reserve capacity AFAIR .
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Follow Up By: Jackolux - Saturday, Mar 12, 2016 at 21:21

Saturday, Mar 12, 2016 at 21:21
Seems I not the only one confused , why can they can't just say Amp Hours ,
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Follow Up By: Nomadic Navara - Sunday, Mar 13, 2016 at 08:26

Sunday, Mar 13, 2016 at 08:26
The OP has a 92 Ah battery. There is no way it will deliver 92 A over a 20 hour period. It will only deliver 4.6 A. If it supplies 4.6 A for 20 hours that gives 4.6 X 20 = 92 Ah.
Amperes (A) is the flow rate at a particular time. If you have 1 A flowing for one hour you have delivered 1 Ah. If the 1 A flows continuously for 4 hours then you have 4 Ah. If you have something that switches on and off every 10 minutes, it draws 1 A when switched on then it will consume 2 Ah over a 4 hour period.
Do you now get the difference between amps and amp hours.
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Follow Up By: Gramps - Sunday, Mar 13, 2016 at 11:43

Sunday, Mar 13, 2016 at 11:43
LOL, I just love threads about electrickery stuff :)))

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Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Sunday, Mar 13, 2016 at 14:58

Sunday, Mar 13, 2016 at 14:58
I need someone to help me understand the term "amps per hour" that many people use.

Flame suit on, head below parapet.

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Follow Up By: Nomadic Navara - Sunday, Mar 13, 2016 at 16:35

Sunday, Mar 13, 2016 at 16:35
Quote "I need someone to help me understand the term "amps per hour" that many people use."

Amps per hour is not a standard term that knowledgeable people use. It's only used by those who don't know much about electricity. I have seen it used in several ways.

The correct term to use is amp hour or ampere hour. I explained it above. Or see Battery Ratings
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Follow Up By: Jackolux - Sunday, Mar 13, 2016 at 19:06

Sunday, Mar 13, 2016 at 19:06
Ok if my Batt is 92Amps @ 20Hours what is that in , Ampere-hour.
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Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Sunday, Mar 13, 2016 at 20:52

Sunday, Mar 13, 2016 at 20:52
Jackolux,

You wouldn't have a 92 amp battery. You would have a 92 amp-HOUR battery. Amps is the measure of instantaneous current in a circuit. Amp-hours is a measure of battery capacity.

If that was a 20 hour rating, which you have indicated, it means if you discharge the battery with a steady current in standard conditions over a period of 20 hours it will deliver 92 amp-hours. The steady current in that case would be 4.6 amps.

If you discharge it over a shorter period of time, ie with a greater current, there is a law worked out over 100 years ago by a man called Peukert, which says you won't get 92 amp-hours out of it, you will get less. If you took, say 10 amps out of it, you wouldn't get 9.2 hours, you'd get fewer.

Under the same law, if you took less current, say 2 amps, you might get more than 92 amp-hours.

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Follow Up By: Jackolux - Monday, Mar 14, 2016 at 06:59

Monday, Mar 14, 2016 at 06:59
Yep ok I do get Amp/Hr , I typed it wrong .
All I was really asking , you go to buy a new battery some are rated at '' X Amp Hrs - 90-100-125ect

Then others like mine are rated @ 92Amp/Hr @20Hr .

How do you compare batteries one rated a X AH the other X-AH @ 20 Hr's
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Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Monday, Mar 14, 2016 at 08:09

Monday, Mar 14, 2016 at 08:09
You can't really compare them unless you have the Hours figure quoted. The most common in my experience is 20 Hrs, often called the C20 rate, so perhaps you could risk an assumption.

If it's missing it would be better to try to find out from the seller/distributor/manufacturer what specification they are using.

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Follow Up By: Nomadic Navara - Monday, Mar 14, 2016 at 08:12

Monday, Mar 14, 2016 at 08:12
Quote "How do you compare batteries one rated a X AH the other X-AH @ 20 Hr's"

It's a bit like comparing litres of fuel in the fuel tanks. A 120 Ah battery will store 20% more energy than a 100 Ah battery.

I say a bit like comparing tanks as you will have seen that a battery changes its size a bit with the the rate you discharge it. However as a rule of thumb you can say a 200 Ah battery contains twice the amount of energy as a 100 Ah battery or two 100 Ah batteries contain twice the energy as one 100 Ah battery (a battery is just a collection of cells working as one unit, when you parallel two 12 V batteries what you have created is actually one battery containing 12 cells.)



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