Are you into Bridge History

Submitted: Sunday, May 15, 2016 at 20:20
ThreadID: 132426 Views:2040 Replies:7 FollowUps:10
This Thread has been Archived
Good Evening All

Just wondering how many of you out there are into Old Bridge History?

Well if you are and are heading through the beautiful Clare Valley, make sure that you stop and see the old Undalya Bridge, a bridge that never sees any tourists.

Constructed in 1879 this bridge was once the largest single span bridge in South Australia and was built by South Australian James Hooker, who owned the Lion Foundary in Kilkenny in Adelaide.

If you know your history, you would know that James was the successful tenderer when in 1889, the South Australia Government called for tenders to build a Railway Bridge over the River Neales, and that bridge sees thousands of tourist as they head up the Oodnadatta Track and stop at his most famous, and longest bridge built by James Hooker....the Algebuckina Bridge.

So next time you head up my way, stop to smell the roses and check out the great old bridge.


Cheers


Stephen







Simpson Desert Colours

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

Back Expand Un-Read 6 Moderator

Reply By: Member - John - Sunday, May 15, 2016 at 20:59

Sunday, May 15, 2016 at 20:59
Stephen, great bridge, but most of us wouldn't be able to drive over it......... LOL
John and Jan

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 600112

Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Sunday, May 15, 2016 at 21:15

Sunday, May 15, 2016 at 21:15
Hi John

Even if you are too heavy to drive over it, you can still walk over it. In emergencies, fire truck have driven over it.



Cheers


Stephen
Simpson Desert Colours

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 869423

Reply By: allein m - Sunday, May 15, 2016 at 21:11

Sunday, May 15, 2016 at 21:11
There is a railway bridge just on the edge of Menindee and most tourists never see it but I love it and find it fascinating bridge

It is an old swing bridge to allow the old paddle steamers come up and down the darling river in the 1800s would have been an amazing sight to see a old paddle steamer on the river

sadly there is not much water there at present


When I was in my 20 I did work on a number of old timber bridges in WA when working with the main road dept , so i am interested in how they made them in the early days , it was back breaking work in those days

I did the resurfacing of the old Gosnellsalbany hwy bridge and many other smaller country ones

Working on the Gosnells one day one of the carpenter's was working on the deck and he yelled out back in a sec he spotted a nice big marron swiing past the bridge the river was not deep , nice lunch that day lol
AnswerID: 600114

Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Sunday, May 15, 2016 at 21:20

Sunday, May 15, 2016 at 21:20
Hi Allein

Old bridges are always fascinating and could tell countless stories. The old bridge that you mention at Menindee, there is one that still operates today on the Sturt Highway at Paringa over the Murray River.


Thanks for your reply.



Cheers




Stephen
Simpson Desert Colours

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 869424

Follow Up By: Member - Chooky and Wobble - Sunday, May 15, 2016 at 22:08

Sunday, May 15, 2016 at 22:08
There is a swing bridge at Longford just south of Sale in eastern Victoria. It has been restored and opens for those that want to view it on a regular basis. Its in wiki camps as a free camp site.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 869433

Reply By: Motherhen - Sunday, May 15, 2016 at 22:18

Sunday, May 15, 2016 at 22:18
That is a lovely old bridge Stephen :). Wonderful to see it remaining and in use. Too often old bridges are removed once replaced.
Motherhen

Red desert dreaming

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 600121

Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Monday, May 16, 2016 at 07:39

Monday, May 16, 2016 at 07:39
Hi Motherhen

The locals that still use the bridge are very pround of this grand old structure and if there was any talk of it being removed, would cause a real public outcry.



Cheers



Stephen
Simpson Desert Colours

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 869439

Reply By: Malcom M - Monday, May 16, 2016 at 08:43

Monday, May 16, 2016 at 08:43
Wonder if thats Two Tons or Two Tonnes ?
AnswerID: 600135

Follow Up By: Athol W1 - Monday, May 16, 2016 at 10:18

Monday, May 16, 2016 at 10:18
Malcom
As the 't' is in the lower case then that is 2 tonnes (metric), so the limit is approx. 40kg less than the 2 ton (imperial) that may have appeared on the original structure.

Regards
Athol
2
FollowupID: 869446

Follow Up By: Malcom M - Monday, May 16, 2016 at 10:22

Monday, May 16, 2016 at 10:22
So tonnes are expressed as lower case. Didn't know that.
1
FollowupID: 869448

Reply By: Idler Chris - Monday, May 16, 2016 at 09:42

Monday, May 16, 2016 at 09:42
Hi Stephen,
will be up your way soon I might check this out. You might like to correct the spelling in the photographs as it had me tricked for a while trying to find them.
This are very interesting bridge as it was built before they knew how to make iron girders, all they used was flat plates and rivets.
Cheers,
Chris
What other people think of me is none of my business.
Do unto others what you would have them do unto you.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 600140

Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Monday, May 16, 2016 at 14:26

Monday, May 16, 2016 at 14:26
Hi Chris

All corrected...lol

The old bridge a real piece of local history and it was only when I was getting some history on the bridge that it was linked to the more famous bridge on the Oodnadatta Track that Outback travellers take for granted.


Cheers


Stephen
Simpson Desert Colours

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 869460

Follow Up By: Motherhen - Monday, May 16, 2016 at 22:43

Monday, May 16, 2016 at 22:43
The light must have been dull when Stephen posted them LOL

Motherhen

Red desert dreaming

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 869484

Reply By: rumpig - Monday, May 16, 2016 at 21:29

Monday, May 16, 2016 at 21:29
If bridges are your thing, then may i suggest next time anyone is up Gympie way they stop in at a place about 40 klms North Westish of there called Miva. At Miva you will find the Dickabram Bridge. Below is a Wikipedia quote relating to the bridge.......

"The Dickabram Bridge is a heritage-listed road-and-rail bridge over the Mary River near Miva, north-west of Gympie in Queensland, Australia. It was the major bridge on the Kingaroy line.

The bridge is one of only two remaining road-and-rail bridges in Australia[1] and the only one in Queensland. It is the oldest remaining large steel truss bridge constructed in Queensland.[2]
Dickabram Bridge timber road deck

The steel and timber truss bridge, built by McDermott Owen & Co., was completed in November 1886 and the line opened for traffic between Dickabram and Kilkivan on 6 December 1886. It is 191m long and stands 23m above the Mary River. All spans are metal trusses except for the 11m approach spans which are tied timber girders. The two river piers are cast iron cylinders; the remaining piers and road deck are timber."








AnswerID: 600166

Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Tuesday, May 17, 2016 at 11:02

Tuesday, May 17, 2016 at 11:02
Hi Rumpig

Thanks for that and when we are next up that way, I will make sure that we visit that grand old bridge.

Thanks for posting those great images and story on it.


Cheers



Stephen
Simpson Desert Colours

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 869497

Reply By: Member - Robyn R4 - Tuesday, May 17, 2016 at 11:07

Tuesday, May 17, 2016 at 11:07
How beautiful!
You really don't see how beautiful they are from road level as you go over them...
I live in an area where the average age of constructions is less than 60 years so this sort of thing is very special.
I love history.
Thanks Stephen.
:)
AnswerID: 600182

Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Tuesday, May 17, 2016 at 11:16

Tuesday, May 17, 2016 at 11:16
Hi Robyn

Thanks for your reply and yes she is a grand old bridge. I think the most special thing is that James Hooker then went on the build the Algebuckina Bridge, a bridge that lots of outback travellers know very well, where as the old Undalya bridge sits there and only ever sees just local traffic.


Cheers


Stephen
Simpson Desert Colours

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 869498

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)