Emergency+ app

Submitted: Wednesday, Jul 27, 2016 at 18:21
ThreadID: 133092 Views:2623 Replies:6 FollowUps:12
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Can this app work in a remote area by allowing a smartphone to communicate with satellites? I think I know the answer, but some third party confirmation would be appreciated.
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Reply By: The Explorer - Wednesday, Jul 27, 2016 at 18:27

Wednesday, Jul 27, 2016 at 18:27
Hi

I assume you mean does it turn a "smartphone" into a satellite phone/spot device (or similar) so you can send and/r receive signals to/from communication satellites (as appose to gps satellites or whatever). Answer is No - there is no app that turns a "normal" phone into such a beast. Requires totally different hardware.

Cheers
Greg
I sent one final shout after him to stick to the track, to which he replied “All right,” That was the last ever seen of Gibson - E Giles 23 April 1874

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Follow Up By: The Explorer - Wednesday, Jul 27, 2016 at 19:00

Wednesday, Jul 27, 2016 at 19:00
Ok

Further to that (now I think I know what you are asking based on other reply) - you will get GPS signal just about anywhere (outside) but if you have no phone signal on your smartphone then your phone will have no outwards communication with the outside world, what ever app you are using.

Keep in mind you don't actually have to be that "remote" to have no phone signal.

Cheers
Greg
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Reply By: Michael H9 - Wednesday, Jul 27, 2016 at 18:32

Wednesday, Jul 27, 2016 at 18:32
Most smartphones can receive gps signals or can figure their location from phone tower triangulation. That app just takes those coordinates and sends them to emergency services. You still need normal phone signal to do it.
AnswerID: 602831

Reply By: TomH - Wednesday, Jul 27, 2016 at 18:47

Wednesday, Jul 27, 2016 at 18:47
All it does is give you your GPS coordinates so if you are in range of a Cellular tower you can tell the 000 operator where you are

From this sitehttp://www.triplezero.gov.au/Pages/EmergencySmartphoneApp.aspx
"apps are not able to automatically provide details of your location to Triple Zero (000) or an emergency service organisation—however, you can read out your GPS coordinates to the emergency operator if they are provided on your smartphone".
It will NOT enable your phone to connect to ANYONE when you are out of range and your phone must have a GPS capability.
A cellular phone cannot connect via any satellite for communication.
One fitted with a Thuraya satsleeve can but that is a different piece of equipment.
The furphy that was going around a few years ago that you can contact 112 via satellite is just that. Sadly one ambulance officer actually told people you could when giving a safety talk.
AnswerID: 602832

Reply By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Wednesday, Jul 27, 2016 at 19:58

Wednesday, Jul 27, 2016 at 19:58
Hi Mike

The short answer in a definite.....NO

Once you are out in a remote location, you will not have any phone towers within cooee so you will be out there by yourself.


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Stephen
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AnswerID: 602838

Follow Up By: old mate - Thursday, Jul 28, 2016 at 06:56

Thursday, Jul 28, 2016 at 06:56
Finally, a straight forward answer which what the OP was after - thanks.
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Follow Up By: TomH - Thursday, Jul 28, 2016 at 09:40

Thursday, Jul 28, 2016 at 09:40
Well "Old Mate" you obviously didnt read the first reply which says exactly that in the second sentence.
Perhaps you could have answered instead of obliquely bagging the responders who gave the answer plus reasons why.
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Follow Up By: The Explorer - Thursday, Jul 28, 2016 at 11:32

Thursday, Jul 28, 2016 at 11:32
Hi

Bit of an explanation when providing an answer to a question doesn't go astray in some cases. None of those provided seem to be overly extravagant in length or complexity i.e. they all seem to be relatively straight forward even though there is some repetition.

Anyway.. the OP never provided any clues as to what sort of an answer he wanted (i.e. old mate is guessing) so I dont think anyone can be blamed for doing the wrong thing. No big deal either way. Keep on chooglin.

Cheers
Greg
I sent one final shout after him to stick to the track, to which he replied “All right,” That was the last ever seen of Gibson - E Giles 23 April 1874

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Follow Up By: Mikee5 - Thursday, Jul 28, 2016 at 15:56

Thursday, Jul 28, 2016 at 15:56
Stephen, please see my answer below, it will explain things.
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FollowupID: 872498

Reply By: Rangiephil - Thursday, Jul 28, 2016 at 08:59

Thursday, Jul 28, 2016 at 08:59
My understanding is that the emergency app will search for a network.

It may be that your provider is out of range but another provider's tower is within range.
I had this same question from someone who had a problem in the Snowies and thought that it went to satellite , when all that happened was that another provider's network was contacted.

Regards Philip A
AnswerID: 602848

Follow Up By: TomH - Thursday, Jul 28, 2016 at 09:17

Thursday, Jul 28, 2016 at 09:17
You dont need any app for that to happen if you dial either 000 or 112 It will go through on ANY available network.
However no signal no call
No standard cellular phone can communicate via satellite.
Note I said Standard phones. There are now hybrids which with additional hardware can do so.

Read about what the app does here.
Appears to give you info on your phone as to what to do but you have to make the call yourself.

http://www.triplezero.gov.au/Pages/EmergencySmartphoneApp.aspx
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Follow Up By: Sigmund - Thursday, Jul 28, 2016 at 12:25

Thursday, Jul 28, 2016 at 12:25
For some smartphones a sleeve is available that turns it into a satphone. Then you need a service subscription.
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FollowupID: 872483

Follow Up By: Michael H9 - Thursday, Jul 28, 2016 at 13:01

Thursday, Jul 28, 2016 at 13:01
There's way too much info in those replies. We're supposed to just say no and leave the thread at one word and one post.
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Reply By: Mikee5 - Thursday, Jul 28, 2016 at 15:52

Thursday, Jul 28, 2016 at 15:52
Thanks to all that replied. Picture a first aid officer delivering training at TAFE and saying this app will work on any smartphone anywhere - even in the middle of the Simpson and he will not accept that it won't work without signal from a tower. Hence the need to seek independent responses. Hopefully he will now accept that it won't work.
AnswerID: 602857

Follow Up By: TomH - Thursday, Jul 28, 2016 at 16:11

Thursday, Jul 28, 2016 at 16:11
HOWEVER A GPS enabled smartphone WILL pick up GPS coordinates ANYWHERE If it has" Use GPS satellites" enabled and so the App will give you your coordinates.
If he stated only the above he is correct to a point,
It WONT however be able to connect to anyone without signal from a tower.
IF he said after doing that it would connect to the Emergency services he is DEAD WRONG and could end up dead as well.
This is the sort of thing I mentioned in my earlier reply. To Keep it brief he is dead wrong and a complete idiot.
People could die from morons giving faulty dangerous advice like that.
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FollowupID: 872499

Follow Up By: Mikee5 - Thursday, Jul 28, 2016 at 16:15

Thursday, Jul 28, 2016 at 16:15
Sorry, I wrote that badly. He said the phone will connect to satellites and transmit a request for assistance.
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FollowupID: 872500

Follow Up By: TomH - Thursday, Jul 28, 2016 at 17:08

Thursday, Jul 28, 2016 at 17:08
Yes I remember an ambulance officer in I think it was Coffs Harbour getting slammed for giving a talk and saying the same stupid thing and this would have been at least 7 years ago so some havent learnt have they.
Here is why it doesnt work
The Global Positioning System carriers are in the L band, centered at 1176.45 MHz (L5), 1227.60 MHz (L2), 1381.05 MHz (L3), and 1575.42 MHz (L1) frequencies.
The Galileo Navigation System uses the L-band similarly to GPS.
The GLONASS System uses the L-band similarly to GPS.
GSM mobile phones operate at 700–900 and 1800–2300 MHz. Iridium Satellite LLC phones use frequencies between 1616 and 1626.5 MHz[2] to communicate with the satellites. Inmarsat and LightSquared terminals use frequencies between 1525 and 1646.5 MHz. Thuraya satellite phones use frequencies between 1525 and 1661 MHZ
So you can show him this as an explanation why one cant talk to the other
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FollowupID: 872501

Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Thursday, Jul 28, 2016 at 21:54

Thursday, Jul 28, 2016 at 21:54
Hi Mike,

Here is one for the expert that thinks he knows it all.

Tell him I will take him out into the true remote bush, hundreds of kilometres from anywhere.If he can get his smart phone to get help, I will not charge him for the experience to taking him bush.

There some people that you just can not tell them anything, and because they were told it will work, it must be true.

There are many great replies above, so let him read them and then let him come back on, tell us all sorry and make him eat humble pie.....lol




Cheers



Stephen
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