Anne Beadell fuel

Submitted: Friday, Aug 26, 2016 at 14:26
ThreadID: 133314 Views:3057 Replies:4 FollowUps:10
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Hi all,
We are setting out on the Anne Beadell track in a couple of days. We are wondering if we have enough fuel, particularly for the Ilkurlka to Coober Pedy section.

We are driving a Landcruiser 200 series, 8 cylinders, diesel. We are towing a camper trailer. We have a 130 litre fuel tank plus one 20 litre jerry can. Is that enough for the 770 kms?

Any updates on the state of the track would be appreciated as well.

Thanks

Sally B3
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Reply By: Baz - The Landy - Friday, Aug 26, 2016 at 14:38

Friday, Aug 26, 2016 at 14:38
Hi Sally

The short answer is yes as long as you can achieve 5 kilometres per litre, or for the purists 20 Litres / 100 kilometres.

It will largely depend on conditions and there are some sandy sections.

I've done it in my Toyota 79 Series dual cab (V8) that weighs in at 3,700kg towing a TVAN and achieved better than 5-kilometres/per litre. Given your speed will be low due to corrugations and the track itself you may find it is sufficient.

Personally, I would be more comfortable having a larger margin well above expected usage which you may find will be in the region of 150 litres.

You have little or no margin for getting it wrong.

Also, don't forget to check the opening times for Ilkurka...

This is my fuel stats for the trip, which worked out at around 6 kilometres per litre...



Here is a link to a blog I wrote on our trip,

Western Deserts - Anne Beadell and Sandy Blight Junction Tracks

Enjoy your adventure...

Cheers, Baz - The Landy
AnswerID: 603861

Follow Up By: Mick O - Friday, Aug 26, 2016 at 19:29

Friday, Aug 26, 2016 at 19:29
Baz, the 200 is notoriously thirsty (Refer back to our Mungkulu adventure). In similar conditions Pete was pulling 25+ litres to the hundred towing the ulti. In the off-track stuff the figures were similar to the space shuttle at launch!

I'd be inclined to err on the side of caution and pack more fuel.

My 2 bobs worth.

Mick
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Follow Up By: Member - Boobook - Saturday, Aug 27, 2016 at 05:48

Saturday, Aug 27, 2016 at 05:48
Ditto
I have a diesel 200 and got about 22l/100K along the ABH towing a Tvan. I assume your tank is 138l too

If you take 2 jerries don't plan any side trips and take extra food and water ......

Personally I would take at the very least 4 ( I took 8 last time). Anyway, at $3.00 per liter, you want to minimise your fuel purchase at Ilkurlka.

It's the same price to buy plastic Jerries at Bursons, fill them somewhere, then at the end of the ABH give the empties away, as it is to buy 20l at Ilkurlka. Maybe cheaper. Or drive over them as you empty them on the way to compact them.

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Follow Up By: Shaker - Saturday, Aug 27, 2016 at 08:19

Saturday, Aug 27, 2016 at 08:19
I plan & prefer to buy fuel from remote roadhouses/communities, I would like think that they will still be there if & when I really need them.
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FollowupID: 873509

Follow Up By: Member - Boobook - Saturday, Aug 27, 2016 at 11:42

Saturday, Aug 27, 2016 at 11:42
I generally like to do that too, and no matter what, you need to buy 100 plus liters at Ilkurlka, which is $300

In this case isn't primarily there to serve tourists, It is owned for the local communities by the local communities and tourists get a side benefit. I had that discussion with the manager when I was there. He said the number of tourist visitors is so low, it makes no difference to their viability.
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FollowupID: 873519

Follow Up By: Member - Boobook - Sunday, Aug 28, 2016 at 07:11

Sunday, Aug 28, 2016 at 07:11
Ah I just remembered an incident at Ilkurlka. We stayed there overnight and had a nice hot shower opposite the Servo.

About mid day, a 200 with a camper was heading east. The driver was flying but stopped for a very quick chat. He said he had tons of fuel, ( 138l plus a jerry). We advised that she should at least fill up...Nah, My fuel gauge is still nearly on full.

A few days later at Neale Junction we were chatting to a group that had been a couple of days behind us. The 200 guy came up in the conversation.

They had been camped near the WA border. "Yeah he flew past us too. Heading east." Then 12 hours later at about 8PM, he passed again heading west, apparently refilling at Ilkurlka. Then east again. He must have got to somewhere half way to Volkes Hill before turning back, realising that he wouldn't make it.

It's a long way to go if you don't have enough fuel. At best, that guy wasted about $400 on fuel, and 3 or 4 days because he was in too much of a hurry to stop for 10 mins and top up.
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FollowupID: 873537

Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Sunday, Aug 28, 2016 at 11:00

Sunday, Aug 28, 2016 at 11:00
.
And the pity is that if that fool had become stranded, sensible fellow travellers would have needed to help him out!
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Member - Boobook - Sunday, Aug 28, 2016 at 12:20

Sunday, Aug 28, 2016 at 12:20
Yes, I find that kind of thing amazing. He had a good looking set up. He had obviously just done insufficient homework. Obviously as the track got worse heading east it dawned on him.

It could have been too late and as you say Allan, someone would have to sacrifice their reserve fuel.

I guess $10 per liter at Emu would be a bargain for the guy though.

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Follow Up By: Shaker - Sunday, Aug 28, 2016 at 19:16

Sunday, Aug 28, 2016 at 19:16
My policy in the real Outback is " never drive past a diesel pump", because the one that you are aiming for may well be out of diesel, which can entail a wait for a few days. Also by buying a bit here & a bit there you meet some really great characters.

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FollowupID: 873550

Follow Up By: cookie1 - Tuesday, Aug 30, 2016 at 08:49

Tuesday, Aug 30, 2016 at 08:49
... ain't that the truth Shaker

We typically fill up straight away, at a remote place a while ago, we filled up as soon as we arrived, then set up camp for the night, in the morning as we were driving out (with full fuel tanks) the fuel pumps weren't working and quite a few 4wd'ers trying to start the pumps, the owner finally lost it at them, he was trying to fix the problem but they kept picking up the nozzles obviously causing more issues.
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FollowupID: 873604

Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Saturday, Aug 27, 2016 at 18:07

Saturday, Aug 27, 2016 at 18:07
Sally,
Like Boobook I also have a TD 200series plus Tvan. They chew thru the fuel at slow speeds offroad - 22L/100k is what I'd be guessing you'll use too. If it were me, I'd have at least 3 jerries. That will give you 180L usable.

Cheers
Phil
AnswerID: 603901

Reply By: Sally B3 - Thursday, Oct 27, 2016 at 21:48

Thursday, Oct 27, 2016 at 21:48
Thank you to all of you who replied to my question. I apologise for this reply which is delayed due to "lots to do..."

In the end we took 2 jerry cans and another 5 litres. This would have been sufficient except for the extraordinary weather we struck on the last leg. As we left Emu the rain started and gradually got worse. When we thought about turning around we couldn't due to the soft surfaces surrounding us. Many kilometres in low range and through constant water brought us to Mabel Creek station at 9.00pm and a chance to get off the road onto a slight drier rise. We were very happy to meet the caretaker the next morning and he was able to fill a jerry can for us. The road from there to Coober Pedy was just as bad except it was daylight!

Thanks again
AnswerID: 605464

Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Thursday, Oct 27, 2016 at 22:52

Thursday, Oct 27, 2016 at 22:52
.
Yes Sally, 'expect the unexpected' !
Cheers
Allan

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Reply By: Baz - The Landy - Sunday, Oct 30, 2016 at 20:36

Sunday, Oct 30, 2016 at 20:36
Hope you enjoyed the trip, it is a great part of Australia!

Cheers, Baz - The Landy
AnswerID: 605537

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