Gibb River Road Hints

Submitted: Monday, May 31, 2004 at 20:13
ThreadID: 13342 Views:2100 Replies:7 FollowUps:1
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Hi There again - we are hoping to travel along the Gibb River Road starting from the eastern end and comming out thru' Tunnel Creek then back tracking to Fitzroy Crossing - travelling in July/August this year in a 4WD dual cab towing a Jayco Penguin 13 camper trailer (not offroad model) - I have been told that this should be no problem apart from access to some of the more "off the track" areas - does anyone have any thoughts or suggestions? I have also been advised to increase pressure in my tyres (vehicle & trailer) significantly to avoid punctures???!!

Are there any traps to avoid? Camping site suggestions? Any other thoughts?

Really appreciate your help here as we are very much new to this part of the country.

Thanks
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Reply By: Lynn2 - Tuesday, Jun 01, 2004 at 11:43

Tuesday, Jun 01, 2004 at 11:43
We travelled in the opposite direction in September 2002. There would have been no trouble towing, except up to the Mitchell Plateau. A great camping spot was at Bell Gorge on GRR. If you get to the camping area early enough you take a tag from a notice board at the entrance which gives you sole use of a camping spot. The one we were lucky enough to choose backed onto a deep swimming hole to which we had sole access. Beaut walk to the falls as well. Manning Gorge was another great camp spot. Would give Jack's Waterhole a miss - lots of dirt and dust (and bats!!) when we were there. Windjana Gorge camping spot was also a good camping area.

It's a great part of the world. If you have time go to Emma Gorge at El Questro. Beautiful walks and great swimming spot. There are hot springs called Zebedee Springs where you can work your way down from very hot, to warm pools of water - very picturesque.

We got 1 puncture on the GRR - at Bell Gorge. That was all. A plug up tyre repair kit plugged up the hole and was invaluable asset on many other occasions.

Have fun!
AnswerID: 61158

Reply By: Lynn2 - Tuesday, Jun 01, 2004 at 11:43

Tuesday, Jun 01, 2004 at 11:43
We travelled in the opposite direction in September 2002. There would have been no trouble towing, except up to the Mitchell Plateau. A great camping spot was at Bell Gorge on GRR. If you get to the camping area early enough you take a tag from a notice board at the entrance which gives you sole use of a camping spot. The one we were lucky enough to choose backed onto a deep swimming hole to which we had sole access. Beaut walk to the falls as well. Manning Gorge was another great camp spot. Would give Jack's Waterhole a miss - lots of dirt and dust (and bats!!) when we were there. Windjana Gorge camping spot was also a good camping area.

It's a great part of the world. If you have time go to Emma Gorge at El Questro. Beautiful walks and great swimming spot. There are hot springs called Zebedee Springs where you can work your way down from very hot, to warm pools of water - very picturesque.

We got 1 puncture on the GRR - at Bell Gorge. That was all. A plug up tyre repair kit plugged up the hole and was invaluable asset on many other occasions.

Have fun!
AnswerID: 61159

Reply By: Coops (Pilbara) - Tuesday, Jun 01, 2004 at 12:15

Tuesday, Jun 01, 2004 at 12:15
Too much pressure in your tyres will INCREASE your chances of getting a puncture so I believe you've been misled there. Adjust your tyre pressure according to the conditions eg the section from El Questro to Kalumburu Road is more corrugated than the rest (traditionally and I can't speak for currently) and has more rocks etc just waiting to penetrate your sidewalls. If sidewalls are too hard and have no flex then rocks will open up your tyres like a can opener. The one & only puncture that I received after 2 visits to GRR was in the first 5 km's thta I did as my tyre pressures were too high (I was given same tip as you).
Your camper will struggle in this particular section (around Jack's Waterhole - don't know if that's been resurrected either) as it is corrugated but you will get through okay. Might be a bit hard getting across the Penetcost depending on how deep that is at the time.
El Questro, Emma Gorge, Manning Gorges, Bell Creek (Silent Grove) & Windjana Gorge are all a must with a stop at tunnel creek on the way out. Old Mornington station was pretty good too. You'll pick up snippets along the way of what's hot & what's not but most of it is well documented in Ron & Viv Moon's Kimberley book.

Hope this helps
AnswerID: 61163

Follow Up By: Member - Brett H (QLD) - Tuesday, Jun 01, 2004 at 21:56

Tuesday, Jun 01, 2004 at 21:56
I ran pressures from 28 to 22 I guess, on the GRR. Much more friendly on everything in the car. Trailer had no more than 22psi.

Just experiment and take the corners a little easy...ie guide the car around and don't pull on the steering wheel.

Enjoy your trip.
0
FollowupID: 322795

Reply By: Moose - Tuesday, Jun 01, 2004 at 13:34

Tuesday, Jun 01, 2004 at 13:34
See post 13332 regarding tyre pressures.
Re camping sites - leave them cleaner than you find them.
It's a beautiful part of Australia - take your time and enjoy it.
AnswerID: 61171

Reply By: Baldrick - Tuesday, Jun 01, 2004 at 21:21

Tuesday, Jun 01, 2004 at 21:21
Driving on corrugations, higher pressures are better (though not for comfort, I agree there). The thing that will destroy tyres is heat buildup due to pressures being too low. On the GRR you just don't have rocks attacking your sidewalls!

On a recent trip I did Great Central Road/Tanami/GRR on 50psi no problems. Travelling companion running 30psi exploded (not just punctured) six, yes six tyres. He was heavily loaded (as was I).

Lots of people won't agree with this and so be it, it's one of those enduring arguments, but it works for me.
AnswerID: 61259

Reply By: Zita - Thursday, Jun 03, 2004 at 22:47

Thursday, Jun 03, 2004 at 22:47
Whoever told you to increase the tyre pressures has never travelled those roads.We travelled that road last year and ended up with 24 & 28 psi with no problems. If you run your tyres at 45 - 50 on those roads you will need to stop every 50 k's an tighten all the bolts on your vehicle and trailer(and your false teeth). We recently travelled the Carpentaria highway from Booroola to Woolagrang towing a boat. While there are nowhere near as many corrigations as the Gibb River road we ran the troopy at 26 & 30 and the trailer at 16. You will get a lot less flat tyres at these pressures than at the high ones.Since we learnt to drop our tyre pressures we have had only ond half flat due to a leaky valve. no more tyre fractures. Half the reason people have tyre problems is they take far too muchbleepwith them on their trip.Take only take what you need You don't need to take half as much as you think. You can buy supplies everywhere in the top end.
Enjoy the Kimberleys its a great part of our country. Doug
AnswerID: 61585

Reply By: Zita - Thursday, Jun 03, 2004 at 22:47

Thursday, Jun 03, 2004 at 22:47
Whoever told you to increase the tyre pressures has never travelled those roads.We travelled that road last year and ended up with 24 & 28 psi with no problems. If you run your tyres at 45 - 50 on those roads you will need to stop every 50 k's an tighten all the bolts on your vehicle and trailer(and your false teeth). We recently travelled the Carpentaria highway from Booroola to Woolagrang towing a boat. While there are nowhere near as many corrigations as the Gibb River road we ran the troopy at 26 & 30 and the trailer at 16. You will get a lot less flat tyres at these pressures than at the high ones.Since we learnt to drop our tyre pressures we have had only ond half flat due to a leaky valve. no more tyre fractures. Half the reason people have tyre problems is they take far too muchbleepwith them on their trip.Take only take what you need You don't need to take half as much as you think. You can buy supplies everywhere in the top end.
Enjoy the Kimberleys its a great part of our country. Doug
AnswerID: 61586

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