Interested in peoples comments about these T Valve fittings

Submitted: Sunday, Sep 25, 2016 at 10:37
ThreadID: 133494 Views:2865 Replies:7 FollowUps:15
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For a while I have followed the various threads on tyre pressure monitors and their inherent damages from the external screw on sensor styles bouncing and being damaged by the wheel rim.

Plus the need for the sensor to be removed when tyre pressure is being changed or tested manually.

I have often wondered about a fitting that would "move" the sensor safely away from the rim and also alleviate the need to remove the sensor for manual testing or adjusting the pressure.

We found a"T" valve stem fitting here that appears to do the job and would like to hear any comments, particularly from users. All comments are always appreciated.

Thanks

Phil

PS (edit) I would expect the sensor to be fitted on the base leg of the "T" and turned back inside the rim away from bushes, stones etc etc

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Reply By: TomH - Sunday, Sep 25, 2016 at 11:08

Sunday, Sep 25, 2016 at 11:08
Had a set on for 50,000K on steel rims and didnt damage either the rim or the unit. Got sick of the little covers and just left them off in the end. Unit worked well apart from a couple of batteries needed replacing. They dont work to well on the spare as they need motion to wake them up in the morning.
AnswerID: 604633

Follow Up By: vk1dx - Sunday, Sep 25, 2016 at 11:50

Sunday, Sep 25, 2016 at 11:50
Hi Tom
Thanks mate but I am asking about using a "T" piece not a TPMS as such.

Any issues that you see to a "T" like being sold at the ebay link. Problems etc?

Phil
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FollowupID: 874420

Reply By: The Bantam - Sunday, Sep 25, 2016 at 11:12

Sunday, Sep 25, 2016 at 11:12
Wile in the past on my street cars I used rigid bolt in tyre valve stems, I will not use them on the 4wd.

Any type of rigid valve stem is a target for being snapped off .......... I hade a standard push in rubber valve stem cop a pretty solid hit from a rock or some such ....... I could see where it had been bent over and the rubber partly torn ...... but it still held pressure ...... if it was a rigid valve stem it would have broken of and rapid deflation would have occured.

Looking at the extra length and the T section involved ...... I'd expect the unit pictured to be far more vunerable than a standard rigid valve stem ...... and many times more vunerable than a rubber stem.

cheers
AnswerID: 604634

Follow Up By: vk1dx - Sunday, Sep 25, 2016 at 11:49

Sunday, Sep 25, 2016 at 11:49
I like the idea of being able to "tuck" the sensor back into the wheel but you brought up a good point about solid valve stems. A very good point. I missed that one.

Tnx

Phil
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FollowupID: 874419

Follow Up By: The Bantam - Sunday, Sep 25, 2016 at 15:44

Sunday, Sep 25, 2016 at 15:44
Yeh well on some rims, there is no tucking going to happen ..... the valve stem points pretty well straight out ...... so by the time you consider the length... it will be sticking out like dogs balls.

cheers
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FollowupID: 874425

Follow Up By: vk1dx - Sunday, Sep 25, 2016 at 16:09

Sunday, Sep 25, 2016 at 16:09
When mounted the straight bit is much the same position as the current stems. So if the right angled bit is turned around to point "into the car" then it is back "inside" the wheel rim. ie tucked back in and out of the way. It would totally stupid to have it point"out" away from the car. Stupid. That's what I meant by "tucking" it back in.

Phil
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FollowupID: 874426

Follow Up By: The Bantam - Sunday, Sep 25, 2016 at 22:03

Sunday, Sep 25, 2016 at 22:03
The metal valve stems that I have used in the past are quite short .... like total length out of the rim ..like twice the length of a valve cap

That T stem is going to be longer than a standard valve stem.

On many rims the valve stem ... even a straight one points out ...... so nothing is tucking in.

on other rims .... the valve stem is pretty much perpendicular to the road so tucks in .... but there can be problems getting a gauge or an inflator on without obstruction .. a longer stem will be worse.

it will depend on you rims .....but for my money not on a vehicle that is going off road.

cheers
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FollowupID: 874435

Follow Up By: vk1dx - Monday, Sep 26, 2016 at 09:49

Monday, Sep 26, 2016 at 09:49
If you look at the photo below the part mounted in the rim, like a normal stem, is only about 28 mm long. That's the straight one. The "T" section, as I refer to it, is 26.3 mm long and if rotated back into the wheel it will NOT stick out the side of the tyre. This would be where the sensor is fitted and well inside the edge s of the rim. Not sticking out the side. We don't need to access the sensors, hence being "back" inside the rim is not an issue either. I don't believe the sensor would touch the brakes but am yet to take a wheel off and measure the gap between the rim and the brakes at the out edge. Luckily having steel, the thickness of the rim "spokes" is a lot less than alloy.

Thanks Bantam

Phil

PS Edit here is another copy the photo that I was referring to.
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FollowupID: 874439

Reply By: Peter_n_Margaret - Sunday, Sep 25, 2016 at 16:50

Sunday, Sep 25, 2016 at 16:50
Add a second (rigid) valve stem for the TPS in a position on the rim where it is not vulnerable. It is only a hole.

Cheers,
Peter
OKA196 motorhome
AnswerID: 604641

Follow Up By: vk1dx - Sunday, Sep 25, 2016 at 17:36

Sunday, Sep 25, 2016 at 17:36
Just asking about these "T" things mate.

Tnx
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FollowupID: 874428

Follow Up By: tuck - Sunday, Sep 25, 2016 at 19:24

Sunday, Sep 25, 2016 at 19:24
It's only a hole Check with your insurance I believe some will not cover you
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FollowupID: 874430

Follow Up By: vk1dx - Sunday, Sep 25, 2016 at 19:28

Sunday, Sep 25, 2016 at 19:28
A good point Tuck

Thanks

Phil
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FollowupID: 874431

Reply By: Member - Alastair D (NSW) - Sunday, Sep 25, 2016 at 17:03

Sunday, Sep 25, 2016 at 17:03
i have used the screw on tpms sensors on both metal and rubber valve stems with little problem. With the flexible stems I did see that the sensor was marking the rim due to vibration so I put some heat shrink over it. This put a buffer between the metal of the sensor and the rim as well as perhaps adding some extra protection.

I think the idea of using the T piece is quite good but I found that putting a second hole in the rim and adding a second stem solved both problems and made airing up/dn easier.

Prior to the tpms I did rip out a rubber valve stem when in some mud and I assume a piece of wood in the muck did the damage.
AnswerID: 604643

Follow Up By: vk1dx - Sunday, Sep 25, 2016 at 17:41

Sunday, Sep 25, 2016 at 17:41
As I have mentioned to Peter above I am only asking about the "T" thingumy's Alastair.

I have been around the threads for a while and still undecided. Only one flat in 50 years tends to tell me that what I am doing now may be the best way out. Nothing and just noticing the "feel" of the car. Have had deflating tyres and always you get that "it feels different" and stop to check things out.

Thanks mate for the post. However I am really after any comments on these things. I am yet to get one from a user but am hoping. . . . . .

Phil
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FollowupID: 874429

Reply By: Member - Trevor_H - Sunday, Sep 25, 2016 at 20:16

Sunday, Sep 25, 2016 at 20:16
Don't have the tee valve stem but looks a good idea to me. I researched everything I could find on TPMS before I purchased. Extensive 4WD testing didn't raise this tee but covered most other questions I had.
I'd be checking the rim you were planning to fit it to,to ensure the sensor will actually be able to be fitted to the branch of the tee. I had short metal stems fitted to the caravan rims when I changed tyres, then found I had to polish a little of the alloy to screw on the sensors as the stems were tucked well inside, pointing to the centre of the rim. Be aware that most stems can be turned when fitted, rubber or metal.
I was more concerned with having the TPMS for the caravan. Not such a "feel" when a tyre is deflating.....until the blowout! Often wondered how many roll overs would have been prevented with prior warning.
AnswerID: 604649

Follow Up By: vk1dx - Sunday, Sep 25, 2016 at 21:25

Sunday, Sep 25, 2016 at 21:25
It looks good at this stage. I just need to remove a tyre and see. At least I have the full dimensions. They are all steel rims. I just don't wan to go spending heaps unnecessarily. We have ten rims with two sets of tyres (mud etc and soft dirt).

Thanks

Phil

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FollowupID: 874434

Reply By: vk1dx - Monday, Sep 26, 2016 at 09:57

Monday, Sep 26, 2016 at 09:57
Thanks all for your comments.

I think that the total cost of one of these for each rim (10) plus fitting and the actual TPMS may not be worth the hassle for us. I think that I will leave the money in the bank.

I don't like the standard setup with the sensors on the "outside" of the rim where they can be easily damaged.

Again thanks all

Phil

PS Maybe put the money towards the hire of a luxury RV for a trans Canadian experience plus a cruise there and back. That's what we are saving for. Ssshh this is OT.
AnswerID: 604659

Follow Up By: TomH - Monday, Sep 26, 2016 at 11:22

Monday, Sep 26, 2016 at 11:22
Hmm did this exercise a couple of years ago We were going to hire an RV and tour in Canada and the US . We worked out the cost against a car and hotels The car won by miles as the RV would have cost an emormous amount in fuel for a start Secondly most RV parks are a bit out of town.
Thirdly whilst I liked driving over there I wouldnt have liked driving a 27ft truck in the cities and finding a park would be practically imposssible. Public transport while good takes time and isnt always the safest at times.

Our two trips with a rental car and hotels or AirBnB apartments worked out at $365 a day for everything Flights, Alaskan cruise, fares, sightseeing trips,rentals, food, every penny we spent was recorded.
Fuel cost was 1169.79 for 63 days and 13900km. Car hire was $36 a day for a full size car. We ended up with a Tucson (IX35) here An RV would have been a lot lot more despite what they say on their websites
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FollowupID: 874442

Follow Up By: vk1dx - Monday, Sep 26, 2016 at 11:26

Monday, Sep 26, 2016 at 11:26
Out of town suits us Tom. Cost - We have two years to save up. A bit like our Kimberley cruise. Saved for ages. It was $800 and night each for 8 nights. 6 star and worth dumping the lattee habit.

Still looking. Maybe a freighter there and back.

Phil
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FollowupID: 874443

Reply By: Member - croaky - Monday, Sep 26, 2016 at 17:26

Monday, Sep 26, 2016 at 17:26
New to exploreOz, but check out my AnswerID: 603923
I have info on fobo t-valves there. I haven't had serious off-road use since installed, so will have to see how they go, I'll take some spare rubber valves with me just in case one gets snapped off, as to replace with another t-valve tyre has to be removed. I'm pretty confident they will be fine.

AnswerID: 604666

Follow Up By: Gramps - Monday, Sep 26, 2016 at 17:42

Monday, Sep 26, 2016 at 17:42
Knew I'd seen the t-valve on here before. Thanks croaky.

Regards
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FollowupID: 874447

Follow Up By: vk1dx - Monday, Sep 26, 2016 at 19:02

Monday, Sep 26, 2016 at 19:02
As said we have the steel rims and the stem is more straight up towards the hub not off to the side like in the photo.

Thanks

Phil
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FollowupID: 874448

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