Axle loadings on new Gen 8 Hilux.

Submitted: Saturday, Nov 12, 2016 at 12:06
ThreadID: 133754 Views:4979 Replies:5 FollowUps:19
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I have been trying to find out the front and rear axle loadings on the new Hilux. I presume all 4X4 models are the same, but the vehicle I am particularly interested in is the SR 4X4 Extracab. Have searched the web and rung the local Toyota dealer (still waiting for a reply) - no success. Anyone know? Thanks
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Reply By: TomH - Saturday, Nov 12, 2016 at 16:53

Saturday, Nov 12, 2016 at 16:53
Ask these guys

http://www.statewide4x4.com.au/gvm-products/toyota-hilux-150-series-4x2-gvm-upgrade.aspx
AnswerID: 605861

Reply By: splits - Saturday, Nov 12, 2016 at 20:35

Saturday, Nov 12, 2016 at 20:35
I have two older Hiluxes and the axle loads are listed in the owner's handbook for both of them. Surely a dealer would know the information is in the book. It should not be any trouble to have a look for you.
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Follow Up By: The Bantam - Sunday, Nov 13, 2016 at 11:49

Sunday, Nov 13, 2016 at 11:49
the axle loadings and some other important figures should be in the manual ... just don't expect to find them all in one place ..... you will probably have to read thru the whole manual to find the important information you need.

cheers
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Reply By: Notso - Sunday, Nov 13, 2016 at 09:46

Sunday, Nov 13, 2016 at 09:46
It's an interesting one, no-one seems to know!

Wonder why?
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Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Sunday, Nov 13, 2016 at 10:40

Sunday, Nov 13, 2016 at 10:40
Can't think why Toyota dealers don't know or are not prepared to divulge, but TomH has found someone who knows about the 4X2 axle weights - see the link in his Reply above.

370kg is a fair whack to add to the rear axle on a dual cab - way more than the 10% that I believe is NSW's limit, though I'm open to correction on that.

Some of the terminology is a bit "different":
[quote]
WHAT AMOUNT OF INCREASE SHOULD YOU EXPECT?
Rear GVM to 3080g
GVM increase of kg over the rear axle only [/quote]

"Rear GVM"?

I checked their BT50 GVM upgrade. They quote an upgrade to 3280, an increase of 302kg. According to Mazda the BT50's GVM is 3200, so their claim makes no sense.

Makes you wonder if they got the Hilux figures right.

If anyone's thinking of using these people, I think you'd be advised to do some careful research first.

Cheers
FrankP

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Follow Up By: Notso - Sunday, Nov 13, 2016 at 11:14

Sunday, Nov 13, 2016 at 11:14
Yeah, saw that, just out of interest I also had a good look around. Can't find figures for Hilux anywhere but BT50 are available also Colorado.

BT50

Axle capacity (kg) front 1480 kg
Axle capacity (kg) rear 1850 kg

Colorado

Maximum allowable front axle load is 1450kg
Maximum allowable rear axle load is 1850kg
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Reply By: Member - Charlie M (SA) - Sunday, Nov 13, 2016 at 11:03

Sunday, Nov 13, 2016 at 11:03
Hi Roger
I have a dual cab with GVM upgrade to 3500kg.
On door tyre placard that lists front 1450kg, rear 2050kg.
That placard has been put over the Hilux tyre placard.
There does not seem to be any mention of axle weight in hand book, mine is 2016.
Cheers
Charlie
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Reply By: Rodger A - Sunday, Nov 13, 2016 at 14:27

Sunday, Nov 13, 2016 at 14:27
Thanks all for the comments so far. I have been researching this as I am contemplating buying an ExtraCab Hilux to carry my slide on Camper - it will need a GVM upgrade. Checking some usual suspects for GVM upgrades - Lovells (in Sydney) do one for the new Hilux (GUN 125/126) from 3050kg to 3500kg. ARB don't do one as they say they factory axle load ratings don't allow sufficient increase to make it worthwhile. Knowing the factory axle ratings might give me more confidence in the substantial Lovells upgrade.
Charlie - what company did your GVM upgrade, and are you happy with it?
Thanks, Rodger
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Follow Up By: TomH - Sunday, Nov 13, 2016 at 16:04

Sunday, Nov 13, 2016 at 16:04
You should search about the evils of slideons and the result of having one hanging over the rear behind the axle . Was a big thread on here with pics of bent chassis a few weeks ago
This one Evils of Slideons
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Follow Up By: splits - Sunday, Nov 13, 2016 at 21:19

Sunday, Nov 13, 2016 at 21:19
" Thanks all for the comments so far. I have been researching this as I am contemplating buying an ExtraCab Hilux to carry my slide on Camper - it will need a GVM upgrade"

Roger

If you are going to do that then make sure the roads that you drive it on are as smooth as a billiard table.

Have a look at this link. bent chassis

This problem is not caused by weight. Some of those cars could have been under GVM. Weight is just a measure of the pull of gravity. It is a figure showing on a weighbridge or scales and it does not change.

These ute chassis have been bent by mass ( the amount of material in something ) and the forces generated by mass when it is in motion.

Whatever you put behind the rear axle is going to have to be lifted suddenly from rest by the rear end of the chassis whenever it suddenly rises. When the chassis suddenly falls, the material on it also falls and builds up momentum. When the chassis stops, the material wants to keep going down. The forces generated thump the end of it down hard rocking the car on the rear axle and jerking the front up.

The further back the material is behind the axle the worse it gets because the distance from the axle back to each piece of material is a lever.

All of this is going to have the end of the chassis constantly flexing up and down. If it is outside its design limits, as it usually is with a loaded slide on, it will eventually fail.

You could install the heaviest springs that you could find or put an air bag in as well and it is not going to make any difference. The heavy material back there has not moved and it is still flexing the end of the chassis up and down.

Chassis are the most common victims in these cases but there have been plenty of broken axle housings as well.

These bent chassis problems are not confined to 4wds in the bush. I have seen two bent 2wd tradie's utes in citys. Both had too much heavy material well back behind the axle.



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Follow Up By: Life Member TourBoy, Bundaberg - Monday, Nov 14, 2016 at 07:19

Monday, Nov 14, 2016 at 07:19
The new hilux chassis has apparently been made from thicker steel and has been fully re-designed to prevent bending as per the mitsi and navara
Cheers,
Dave
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Follow Up By: 9900Eagle - Monday, Nov 14, 2016 at 08:30

Monday, Nov 14, 2016 at 08:30
Dave people are still bending them.
There are two latest model tray back hilux utes running around here that are owned by the same company and both have bent chassis.
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Follow Up By: Jackolux - Monday, Nov 14, 2016 at 09:16

Monday, Nov 14, 2016 at 09:16
Can you give anymore info on the 2 bent Hilux , what body do they have , what sort of load , what work are they set up for .
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Follow Up By: 9900Eagle - Monday, Nov 14, 2016 at 11:29

Monday, Nov 14, 2016 at 11:29
Bodies are as I said trays standard size. By the gear they are used for road works or sub division work and I haven't got a clue what load they carry at different times.

They seem to be well looked after and are always clean.
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Follow Up By: Rodger A - Monday, Nov 14, 2016 at 14:36

Monday, Nov 14, 2016 at 14:36
Hi Eagle. Are those Hiluxes dual cabs, extra cabs or single cabs?
Thanks
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Follow Up By: 9900Eagle - Monday, Nov 14, 2016 at 14:43

Monday, Nov 14, 2016 at 14:43
I should have stated that. Dual cabs
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Follow Up By: splits - Monday, Nov 14, 2016 at 21:43

Monday, Nov 14, 2016 at 21:43
" The new hilux chassis has apparently been made from thicker steel and has been fully re-designed to prevent bending "

They will be no different from the old ones. All chassis are designed to carry a certain load in certain conditions. That includes all from the past, the present and the future. They have done it successfully for millions of owners all over the world and will continue to do it successfully in the future for any owner who keeps them within their design limits. It is only a tiny minority that bend them and that is always because the owner has overloaded the rear end.

No manufacturer is going to strengthen a chassis to cater for owners who want to place an excessive amount of heavy material well back behind the rear axle then lift the sagging suspension with some other company’s suspension or air bags. For a start doing that to a car will have stuffed up the whole dynamics of it and will affect the way it stops steers and handles. If a manufacturer was to do that they would have to go back to the drawing board and redesign the whole car, including the engine, cooling system, drive train and brakes.

They also have no interest in those who want to give the car a GVM upgrade. They will tell you they have larger cars if you want to carry a heavier load.

That bent ute story in 4X4 Australia magazine in April last year was long overdue but there was one point in it that was not part of the story. It was a comment in the editorial. The editor said the carrying capacity should be reduced by 30 to 40 percent in off road conditions. I was taught that in the Armed Forces many years ago.

That is just common sense. You can’t load a volume selling low priced ute to the limit or beyond then flog it along on rough roads for weeks at a time on long distance holidays and expect maximum reliability.

If it was built to Ferrari standards with a price tag to match, you would most likely get away with it.
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Follow Up By: Life Member TourBoy, Bundaberg - Tuesday, Nov 15, 2016 at 06:24

Tuesday, Nov 15, 2016 at 06:24
The new hilux is a new vehicle from the ground up. New chassis (strengthened to meet 5 star ANCAP and by design helps to prevent bending), new driveline, new interior, new electronics, larger and new everything else. Toyota aren't the worlds most popular brand by not advancing their products in line with customer expectation.
Cheers,
Dave
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Follow Up By: 9900Eagle - Tuesday, Nov 15, 2016 at 19:53

Tuesday, Nov 15, 2016 at 19:53
Dave , Toyota is missing out, they should give you a job promoting their gear.

I will still state it again, they bend as all dual cabs will if they are loaded incorrectly. Now, anyone got an owners manual that states how to load them.

What I pointed out was, even though the chassis have been beefed it still happens. In other words warning, warning, warning for all dual cab owners.
From dropping off gear at mines there are also plenty of dual cab cruisers with bent chassis.


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Follow Up By: splits - Tuesday, Nov 15, 2016 at 20:03

Tuesday, Nov 15, 2016 at 20:03
" Toyota aren't the worlds most popular brand by not advancing their products in line with customer expectation."

They have been doing that ever since the first Landcruisers landed hear in the late 1950s.

Each new model has been better and stronger than the previous one but none of them have been unbreakable despite what the advertising says.

If you put an excessive amount of heavy material on the rear end of the current model and bounce it up and down for long enough on rough roads, either the chassis or the axle housing will eventually bend or crack.
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Follow Up By: 9900Eagle - Tuesday, Nov 15, 2016 at 20:08

Tuesday, Nov 15, 2016 at 20:08
Splits you have a job as well.
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Follow Up By: Life Member TourBoy, Bundaberg - Wednesday, Nov 16, 2016 at 06:32

Wednesday, Nov 16, 2016 at 06:32
I said "designed to prevent bending" nowhere did I say unbendable or unbreakable, maybe you guys need to learn to read :)
Cheers,
Dave
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Follow Up By: Jackolux - Wednesday, Nov 16, 2016 at 09:28

Wednesday, Nov 16, 2016 at 09:28
I think all manufacturers would claim their vehicles are designed to prevent bending .
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Follow Up By: splits - Wednesday, Nov 16, 2016 at 21:51

Wednesday, Nov 16, 2016 at 21:51
" I said "designed to prevent bending"

Where did you get this information from? Did it come from an official Toyota document?

Just suppose they did add a little more steel here and there in an attempt to stop the chassis bending. That would add to the production costs of the chassis not to mention the alterations they would have to make to the whole car to allow for a heavier chassis. If it was as little as $100 per car and they sold a million of them, that would cost them a hundred million dollars just to try and make the car idiot proof.

I could not imagine any car manufacturer doing that. If they did then why stop with the chassis? They could for example redesign their non turbo engines so they don't blow up when someone fits an aftermarket turbo. Please don't say that does not happen, I have fixed a few of them at work and seen many others.

That is just one of many examples of parts failing when they are used outside their design limits.
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