What recovery gear should I take

Submitted: Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 10:22
ThreadID: 133927 Views:3628 Replies:22 FollowUps:31
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Hi everyone,
we are brand new into 4WD and heading to Cameron's corner soon. Just wondering if we need to bring our recovery gear with us.
Our tug is a 2016 diesel Prado with front and rear recovery points and Cooper ST/Maxx tyres fitted which match our Ultimate camper.
We have a compressor, snatch strap, equaliser, shovel, max trax, tyre repair kit, PLB and 5W handheld UHF. Is there anything else that I have forgotten?
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Reply By: Jackolux - Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 10:43

Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 10:43
You pretty much have it covered , unless you are very unlucky you probably won't need any of it .
You say you are going soon its getting very warm out there ,
AnswerID: 606622

Reply By: Frank P (NSW) - Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 11:01

Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 11:01
Vehicle-wise I think you have it covered.

With the amount of 4WD traffic around these days I don't know if people consider Cameron's corner remote any more, but depending on where you're coming from you might be travelling through remote areas to get there. I note you have a PLB, but you can't talk to a doctor with that. Do you have a comprehensive first aid kit? Have you considered buying or renting a satphone?

Cheers
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Reply By: Sir Kev - Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 11:04

Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 11:04
Tyre Gauge

Common Sense

First Aid Kit

Cheers Kev
Russell Coight:
He was presented with a difficult decision: push on into the stretching deserts, or return home to his wife.

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Reply By: phantom - Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 11:14

Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 11:14
Thanks for your quick replies.
I am traveling with the good lady and Mr 14YO.
We are heading off from Melbourne to Lightning Ridge, the onto Trilby Station, White Cliffs and hopefully up to the corner. I agree that it is going to be bloody hot but unfortunately we are dictated by my work and our son's schooling. If it is too hot, we will revise our plans.
Although we are new to 4WD, we have done a lot of camping all around this great country, mainly on the black top
We have a comprehensive first aid kit and I'm pretty competent on using it if needed. We also have a tyre deflator.

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Reply By: Member - ACD 1 - Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 11:53

Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 11:53
Phantom

It looks like you have the basics covered.

Not trying to be smart, but do you know how to use it? If not have a practice before you go.

No point in having the gear and not knowing what to do with it or waiting for someone else to come along.

Cheers

Anthony
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Too many places - too little time

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Follow Up By: phantom - Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 12:51

Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 12:51
very good point. I have not used the snatch straps yet. Meeting up with my son at Lightning Ridge so will do some recoveries with him in his Troopy.
I have used the compressor and tyre deflator.
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Reply By: Malcom M - Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 12:16

Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 12:16
Of course you need to bring your recovery gear with you. Why else did you buy it...

A 5w handheld will not have the range that a 5w 'in dash' unit will have!
Either one has stuff all range anyway so the sat phone is a very good idea.

Additional spare tire carcass on the roof rack? You can fit it to a rim when needed.
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Follow Up By: phantom - Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 13:07

Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 13:07
My first purchase when I get back will be an in dash UHF, looking at the GME TX3500S as I like the idea of everything in the hand set but am open to better suggestions.
I will also look into sat phones as it seems that the prices are coming down and you can get "normal"plans for them.
We have 2 spares as the camper has the same rims and tyres as the tug.
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Follow Up By: Malcom M - Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 13:31

Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 13:31
The TX3500 is a good unit but I suggest you try one out first.
Looking at the mic buttons whilst driving may be distracting.
Maybe ask for owners experience in a separate thread?
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Follow Up By: Member - Scott M (NSW) - Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 19:02

Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 19:02
I have some travelling companions who opted for the "all the buttons on the mic" option. They regret it ... constantly accidentally hitting wrong buttons and either changing channels or sending it into scan mode. Makes the thing 'delicate' to handle.

Given that we travel in very remote places and stay on a designated channel almost all the time, some are reverting back to the simpler mike option.
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Follow Up By: RMD - Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 20:55

Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 20:55
The last two times I used my UHF in emergency was a distance of 70km to Nilpinna station and to LynniePlate' at Oodnadatta, a 50 km distance. Proper setups do work well.
Last one was Mid July Between Georgetown and Mt Surprise QLD. Emergency transmission was received by Undara Lava Tube reception. 140km away. Police had the issue 4 min after a truck crash.

My GME handheld will transmitt 100km over clear terrain to Repeater tower. There are many towers in the outback. Know your tower channel #s when travelling.
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Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 22:37

Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 22:37
RMD,

Do you use a burner?
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Follow Up By: Sigmund - Wednesday, Dec 14, 2016 at 13:26

Wednesday, Dec 14, 2016 at 13:26
I'm very happy with an all-in-one handpiece. It sits high on the dash where it's easy to read and reach, and the box is tucked away under a kick panel. When not needed the handpiece can easily be detached and put in the glove box.
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Reply By: Frank P (NSW) - Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 12:38

Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 12:38
At the risk of diverging from your question about recovery gear ...

You say you are brand new into 4WD. Have you researched tyre pressures for varying conditions?

Here is what my tyre manufacturer recommend for my BFG All Terrain KO2s for my vehicle (2014 BT50) at the axle loadings I provided in their website form



These are cold pressures. Apart from highway and based on experience, I generally run a bit softer, and at lower speeds, but I find it is a handy guide for when my vehicle is heavily loaded. "Cross country" covers a multitude of sins. Corrugations are different from stony roads, which are different again from smooth dirt which are different from fire trails (not many of those around your destination:-)), etc. I find a bit of interpretation is required.

If you could get something similar from your tyre manufacturer it would be a worthwhile guide - if you haven't already done your research.

You sound like you're preparing yourself well. Enjoy your trip.

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Follow Up By: phantom - Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 12:48

Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 12:48
Thanks Frank,
I do have a leaflet from Cooper Tyres that gives the different pressures for the different terrain - 32-38 for highway, 32 - 36 for good gravel roads, 26 - 32 for rough gravel, 18 - 26 for sand etc. I printed this off and keep it in the car
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Follow Up By: CSeaJay - Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 12:54

Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 12:54
Frank,
You will find many people disagree with those pressures.
I for one find them way too high for gravel, sand and mud.
Above reply by phantom is closer to the mark.
Sorry, do not mean to hijack the thread on a single topic, but also do not want to see "advice" such as that taken as gospel
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Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 13:44

Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 13:44
Agreed, CSJ. I was surprised when I got their email.

As I said, I run lower, but I guess it's a starting point for experimentation at that weight for those tyres. And what is "Cross Country"? Loose gravel? Hard substrate? BFG is now owned by Michelin, so maybe their reply was with a European mindset.

Phantom, again you seem to have the issue covered and I agree with your pressures - even a bit lower sometimes, but keep the speed down if you do that.

On rough gravel in my 120 Prado with original BFG All Terrains I would start at 23(f) and 26(r) cold and speed about 60kph. They would warm up to about 27(f) and 30(r). They wore ok and I had no sidewall damage from excessive bulging.
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 14:23

Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 14:23
Hi Frank

Even though that is what they recommend, I personally would never use those pressures for a number of very good reasons.

For dirt road driving I usually run around 28psi front and real, heavy corrugations down between 18 - 20 psi and soft sand start at 14psi.

Running those pressure I have a comfortable drive and not wrecking my vehicle.

The pressure they recommend sounds like their tyre research guys should do more off-road research. Try running their pressures on say the Anne Beadell and you will shate the hell out of your vehicle and you will not have one filling left in your teeth when you get home. Then there is the sand driving, again no idea on what it is like out their in the real world. On their pressures, on say a Simpson crossing, you will get bogged on almost every dune and cut the hell out of the track.

Like I said, just my thoughts and I want my vehicle and tyres to get home in one piece.



Cheers





Stephen

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Follow Up By: phantom - Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 20:35

Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 20:35
G:day Stephen,
Off topic but we have fitted the stone stomper to protect the Ultimate for this trip as you recommended before we bought the Ultimate.
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 21:21

Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 21:21
Hi Phantom

You will find it the best money that you have spent on the Ultimate. If you have read my comments on the Ultimate forum, they are just brilliant.

The first thing is no more small stone chips on the back of your vehicle and a clean and fully protected back window. Depending on what age your Ultimate is, you will fully protec the nose cone and and even the front half under your Ultimate will be kept like new.

The country you are intending to visit is good easy country and from what you have said above, you have all bases covered. make sure yo carry extra water just for the safety side of things.



Have a great drive.





Cheers




Stephen
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Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 22:36

Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 22:36
Now we're really off topic.

I also use a StoneStomper with my Kimberley Karavan. Absolutely excellent for both the van and the back of the tug.

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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Tuesday, Dec 13, 2016 at 07:14

Tuesday, Dec 13, 2016 at 07:14
Hi Frank

As Christine would say, it does not matter what you tow, the Stone Stompers are just brilliant, dead easy to fit and save all those headaches of seeing your pride and joy getting sand blasted from dirt road driving.

They are one product that should be included as part of you travelling kit when heading bush.



Cheers



Stephen
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Follow Up By: Member - Robert1660 - Tuesday, Dec 13, 2016 at 17:10

Tuesday, Dec 13, 2016 at 17:10
Hi Guys,
Rear window stone protector is a must. They say that the rear window is more expensive to replace than the front windscreen. Many people use corflute but I went with the custom made polycarbonate protectors from Plasweld. With respect to tyre pressures make sure that they are adjusted to suit conditions. If you have a tyre temperature/pressure system installed the effect of too low,/high pressure soon becomes obvious. That is not to say you should not run low pressures, far from it, but you will need to moderate your speed to compensate.
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Follow Up By: Sigmund - Wednesday, Dec 14, 2016 at 13:30

Wednesday, Dec 14, 2016 at 13:30
Whether you need protection depends on the CT design. Some have a downward-facing Rhino-coated front that takes care of stones.

I've always been puzzled by the fitting of stretchy protectors on the towbar. Just provides a trampoline for the stones it seems to me.
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Wednesday, Dec 14, 2016 at 19:40

Wednesday, Dec 14, 2016 at 19:40
Hi Sigmund

Here are a few answers to your reply, and I will only comment on the Ultimate Camper, the type that we have, and a few general answers.

Regardless of what camper design you have, Christian will taylor make a Stone Stomper to suit your pride and joy.

Any vehicle and trailer combo can and will break your rear back window in your vehicle does not uses a Stone Stomper, rear window perspex cover or covered with tape and cardboard.

Any Camper will get damaged by flying stones, which in turn can and will be directed back to the towing vehicle, with impact to the rear window and the back tailgate of the vehicle.

As for for the Rhino front coating, this has changed over the years. My Ultimate is more durable and will take a lot of impact, before it does mark. The newer type Ultimates have now gone away and use a very rigid product, that when has stone impact, will badly chip and has cost owners nearly $2000 to have there new Ultimates resprayed, even after just one trip on real stoney tracks.

The Stone Stomper will stop stones from hitting the back of your camper or caravan and keep it like new, after thousands of kilometres of dirt road travel.

No need to use any rear window protection, as the Stone Stomper will stop any stones hitting the back of the camper/caravan and tow vehicle. Also the rear window has far less dust over it, even in real fine bull dust, as again most of it is deflected by the Stone Stomper.

As for being stretchy, the only part that will flex are the cords that keep it in shape, as the actual material is very similar to shade cloth, but far stronger and thicker.

Any stones that come in contact with the underside of the Stone Stomper are deflected down, so they do not end on top as you say in the trampoline effect.

I have no affiliation with the company, but just one very happy and satisfied customer that will always give praise and credit to any product that deserves it.




Cheers



Stephen


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Follow Up By: Baz - The Landy - Friday, Dec 23, 2016 at 05:42

Friday, Dec 23, 2016 at 05:42
Another vote for the Stone Stomper. I recently upgraded my old TVAN to a new one and fitted a Stone Stomper.

Been away the past couple of weeks on dirt, gravel, sand, and not a mark on the front of the new TVAN.

Previously used Rock-tamer product, but Stone Stomper leaves it for dead...

Cheers, Baz - The Landy
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Reply By: RMD - Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 13:06

Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 13:06
I presume you won't be driving all the time.
Therefore, I would make sure i took a large tarp/cover and tent poles. When you stop and it is sunny there will be hardly any shade.

A large cover can be doubled and strung up so an airspace between acts as an insulator from radiant heat and allows some degree of comfort as you enjoy the 40 + temp.
Me no go there when hot.
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Reply By: Mikee5 - Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 13:32

Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 13:32
Please be aware you will void the kilometre warranty on your Cooper tyres if you leave the bitumen.
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Follow Up By: phantom - Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 14:01

Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 14:01
I find this to be so illogical Mikee5, another marketing ploy.
What is the point of having AT tyres if you only stay on the bitumen?
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Follow Up By: HKB Electronics - Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 18:03

Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 18:03
I found the below on Coopers Australian website:

"TRAVELLING OFF ROAD Does the Warranty cover off-road damage?

We do not warrant against tyre punctures and damage, as they are seen as general road hazards and not a manufacturing defect or reason for not achieving the stated mileage warranty for the tyre.

Does the Mileage Warranty apply if you drive off road?

Yes, we understand that most people will take their four wheel drives off road, but as stated above, road hazards or damage that is not a manufacturing fault are not covered. An Authorised Cooper Tires Retailer can refuse to give you a mileage warranty based on their discretion on the intended use of the tyres."

I find the above fair enough, if your travelling on gravel roads, tracks with limestone, rock hopping etc your not going to get 80000K's out of them.

I replace them when there around half worn anyway, if your travelling remote and your running them down to there wear indicators your just asking for trouble.

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Reply By: Sigmund - Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 14:01

Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 14:01
Bit of canvas or a closed-cell foam mat, as you usually end up kneeling or lying down to work on something.

If you're not in convoy the handheld UHF won't be of much use - can't be relied on.
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Follow Up By: phantom - Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 14:50

Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 14:50
Have got c-gear matting for the camper that we can use as a ground sheet, canvas awnings for the camper and might get a side awning for the Prado.

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Reply By: gbc - Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 14:48

Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 14:48
Water in separate containers. Enough fuel to drive all day - you wont want to be out of the air con for long.
Fly nets. A sense of humour. A shemagh. Been there done that.
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Follow Up By: phantom - Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 16:10

Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 16:10
Long range tanks in the Prado and will have 110 litres of water in the camper as well as drinks in the Engel in the car.
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Reply By: MEMBER - Darian, SA - Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 15:57

Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 15:57
Recovery gear is only part of the story....its only smart/sensible/responsible to envisage the worst case scenario (illness - injury - vehicle breakdown - heat wave etc.) and then make sure you have the goods to deal with it !.....that is sparse and inhospitable country out there in the middle of high summer. Most experienced outback travelers wouldn't go 'soon' unless they had heaps of backup water and long distance communications (satphone or HF radio...both can be hired). But of course, Murphy advises that once you have all bases covered, it 'will' be a good trip ;-)....best to keep a close eye on the weather forecast as you say .....Tibooburra has already racked up a few 40C+ days this month...one at 43.9C.
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Reply By: Member - mark D18 - Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 16:04

Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 16:04
Phantom

Looks like you have it covered.

Cheers
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Reply By: Life Member - Duncan W (WA) - Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 16:20

Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 16:20
The 14yo will be handy if you need to use the shovel.

If you do pack some inner tubes then you'll need the tools to remove the tyre from the rim and put back on. And know how to use the tools. I have an R & R Bead Breaker which is very user friendly and you can use on alloy rims.

Some tyre repairs may need a bit more than just a plug or three so some good patches for the tyres are very handy and you'll need the tools mentioned above to do that.

You didn't mention shackles you'll need 2 rated ones and also a snatch strap dampener if you don't already have them.

Enjoy your trip.

Dunc.
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Follow Up By: phantom - Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 19:10

Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 19:10
Thanks Dunc,
Have 2 rated shackles as well in the recovery kit.
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Follow Up By: Member - silkwood - Thursday, Dec 22, 2016 at 21:34

Thursday, Dec 22, 2016 at 21:34
If you are going down the change your own tire track (sorry, bad pun), DON;T FORGET THE SOAP! And I'm not talking about washing your hands after the fact.
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Reply By: MUZBRY- Life member(Vic) - Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 19:13

Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 19:13
Gday Phantom
I would be taking "Hero" and "Rex" Hero can tow you out and Rex can keep you company. Diana would be better company than Rex and Guran can do the cooking and cleaning.
Muzbry
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Follow Up By: phantom - Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 19:34

Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 19:34
Maybe Devil to keep guard and protect us from Roughnecks and the dreaded Singh pirates.
Cheers Muz.
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Follow Up By: Member - Murray R (VIC) - Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 22:20

Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 22:20
Muz
Youv'e read to many comics in your time. The penny just dropped as to what you were talking about LOL.

The other Muz
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Reply By: Tim Owen - Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 21:09

Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 21:09
I drove a VW Kombi Camper out there 20 years ago ... you'll be fine
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Reply By: rocco2010 - Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 22:08

Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 22:08
Reading how this thread has developed reminded me of the person I met the other day who told me of some of her adventures travelling from Kununurra to Townsville in the early 1970s in a Chevrolet Impala.

Recovery gear? what's that?

Cheers
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Reply By: splits - Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 22:24

Monday, Dec 12, 2016 at 22:24
phantom

Six months ago my wife and I drove out through Bourke, Tibooburra, Cameron Corner and on to the Strzelecki Track to Innamincka in a Hilux 4x4. The roads were so good I am sure I could have taken my daughter's Mitsubishl Mirage hatchback through there without any trouble.

The only thing likely to stop you out there is rain. If that happens the roads will most likely be closed. We had to camp for two days at Bourke until the roads were reopened after rain. When they opened they were slightly damp in some places but still very easy to drive on.

If you do have to drive on roads out there after rain then stay in the centre as much as possible. That is where the hard packed surface is. Do not go onto the edges. During dry periods, thick dust can build up and look very smooth. After rain it turns to thick mud but it can easily look like a nice smooth hard surface that looks much better to drive on than the rougher centre.

I saw what can happen when a car goes too far onto the edge of the road in those conditions while driving in that area a few years ago in a small convoy. The driver thought the smooth edges looked hard so he drove partially onto them to avoid a small puddle hole in the middle of the road. The mud dragged the car in and within seconds it was sitting on its chassis with all four wheels bogged.

We have a simple rule that we always adhere to when travelling on our own i.e don't get stuck. Solo recovery is not much fun and it is not always successful. Get local advice and check the weather reports before you go into the next stage of a trip. If things don't look all that good then we don't go there.

I noticed you have a tyre plug kit. We never carry one but we do have enough equipment to fix some very large holes in both the tread, shoulder and side walls. Read the tyre information in this site. Tyre repairs. .

You never know what is going to happen to tyres in both mountains and deserts so if you are serious about fixing punctures, you need to go a lot further than just a plug kit.

Another point is snatch straps, particularly if you don't have any experience with them. They have killed or seriously injured far too many people. I have been trained to use them in an accredited driver training course but I don't carry one. Have a look through these sites.Snatch straps

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Follow Up By: Member - shane r1 - Tuesday, Dec 13, 2016 at 00:30

Tuesday, Dec 13, 2016 at 00:30
G'day all
My comment on snatch straps is, you don't have to "snatch" . The big yank is only for if you can't gently tow the vehicle out.
Some people just want to give it the big yank which is a lot more dangerous, than just gently pulling. And the straps work just fine for the gentle job too.
Cheers
Robbo
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Follow Up By: splits - Tuesday, Dec 13, 2016 at 10:12

Tuesday, Dec 13, 2016 at 10:12
"My comment on snatch straps is, you don't have to "snatch" . The big yank is only for if you can't gently tow the vehicle out."


That should be the signal that tells you to try some other method.

It is the big yanks that slowly weaken recovery points. That is my main concern with them. I have no way of knowing the exact condition of the recovery points on the other car. If they break it is me who is going to get hurt, not the driver of the other car.
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Reply By: wato35 - Wednesday, Dec 14, 2016 at 13:02

Wednesday, Dec 14, 2016 at 13:02
I may have missed it in the many answers, but you must have

DUCT TAPE.
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Reply By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Thursday, Dec 15, 2016 at 07:40

Thursday, Dec 15, 2016 at 07:40
Hi Phantom

Not sure what state you live in, but here in South Australia, they have just put out a servere weather warning for the north east pastoral area, with 50 to 100 mil of rain expected and have advised anyone in the area now to head for high ground and prepare of very wet conditions.

Even after the rain has gone, conditions will still be very sticky for a good few days, so my only advise is.......if it's wet, keep out of the area.





Cheers




Stephen
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Follow Up By: phantom - Thursday, Dec 15, 2016 at 08:10

Thursday, Dec 15, 2016 at 08:10
Thanks Stephen,
We are near Melbourne and plan on heading up to Lightning Ridge and catch up with our eldest son for Christmas and then West with no specific plans.
We will watch the weather and change our plans if needed.
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Reply By: Lindsaydi - Thursday, Dec 15, 2016 at 23:30

Thursday, Dec 15, 2016 at 23:30
Just a couple of things to consider, snatch straps do you have a tow stap, you will need also a sling to go between both recovery at the front to snatch, chassis have been known to stretch when being pulled violently. You also need a block to go into your slot where hitch fits, to many people have been killed not using one. Your choice of UHF is good, you can in fact purchase an outside aerial for the handheld. You have made a good choice with permanent UHF you may not need it with a properly mounted handheld. Why not utilise you smartphone with a sleeve which will give you a sat phone. Recovery gear should be put vehicle before your wife, that way she will know that you are always thinking of her. As for the Coopers any probs call 1300cooper the people you talk to have already done what you are doing as part of job description. In fifteen years in all deserts dunes in central and Northern Australia I have never had a problem.All your gear is good for start have fun and hope you never use any of you gear.
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Follow Up By: Michael H9 - Saturday, Dec 24, 2016 at 10:54

Saturday, Dec 24, 2016 at 10:54
You don't need a block, you can just push the end of the strap inside the hitch and put the hitch pin through the loop. The only danger is bending the pin but I've never seen that happen yet in 100's of snatches. Couple that with recovery hooks that you can loop the snatch over and you don't need shackles which is a good thing.
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Reply By: Batt's - Friday, Dec 16, 2016 at 13:12

Friday, Dec 16, 2016 at 13:12
I have never been out there so don't know what situations you may come across. You have recovery gear and are new to 4wdriving so do you know how to use that gear correctly to try and get out of trouble should it happen or at least give it a reasonable go without panicking or having to solely relying on passing travellers.
Personally I would do as much local 4WDriving with friends or someone with reasonable knowledge that can help teach you and your family how to recover yourself in different situations before venturing into remote areas in summer for you and your families sake especially if traveling solo. Then you all will have more confidence in yourself, your vehicle, it's capabilities and enjoy the trip more just my opinion.
AnswerID: 606728

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